Insurgency wikia

Insurgency wikia DEFAULT

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| 2:Label = Genre | 2:Value = Tactical first-person shooter

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| 3:Label = Developer | 3:Value = New World Interactive

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| 4:Label = Publisher | 4:Value = New World Interactive

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| 7:Label = Release date | 7:Value = January 22, 2014

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Cooperative

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}} Insurgency (also known as INS, or Insurgency 2) is the second installment in the Insurgency series and was developed and published by New World Interactive. It is the follow-up game to the award-winning Source mod, Insurgency: Modern Infantry Combat. It was officially released on January 22, 2014 on Steam. In February 2017, NWI confirmed that the game would no longer receive content updates (except from bug fixes), due to focusing on the development of Insurgency: Sandstorm.[1]

Multiplayer[]

Classes[]

Main article: Classes of Insurgency

Insurgency features 22 unique classes (10 Security classes, 11 Insurgency classes, and the VIP class). Though some are very similar, each has different sets of primary and explosive weapons available to them. All classes have access to all available secondary weapons, protective armors, and ammo vests. Each class has 10 supply points that may be used for weapons, attachments, and gear at the start of a match or at a re-supply point.

Classes[]

Security ForcesInsurgent Forces
Short to mid range riflemen
Specialist - Specialists excel at close quarters combat, though can be very versatile at medium range as well. Their role is to lead the fireteam and act as a pointman. They are equipped with a carbine, pdw, or shotgun and have access to all grenades. Specialist - The specialist is a very versatile unit and has the ability to quickly adapt to any situation. He is equipped with a select-fire assault rifle, DMR, or PDW, and has access to all grenades.
Recon - The recon class' role is similar to the specialists' role. They are good at close quarters combat, though are more well equipped than the specialists' for medium range. They are equipped with either a carbine or pdw and have access to all grenades. Scout - The scout's role is very similar to the specialist's role. He is a very versatile unit and has the ability to quickly adapt to any situation. Unlike the specialist, the scout has access to the MP40 (rather than the AKS-74u) and the SKS (rather than the FAL). He is equipped with either a select-fire assault rifle, DMR, or PWD, and has access to all grenades.
Militant - The militant's role is similar to the scout's and specialists' role. They are a very versatile unit in their cell and have the ability to quickly adapt to any situation. Unlike the scout and specialist, militants have access to the TOZ shotgun (rather than a PDW). They are equipped with either a select-fire assault rifle, or DMR, or shotgun, and have access to all grenades.
Rifleman - Riflemen are the backbone of the fireteam. Their role is to provide cover fire to their squadmates. They are equipped with either a select-fire assault rifle or DMR and have limited access to grenades. Fighter - Fighters are the backbone of the Insurgent cell. Their role is to provide cover fire for those in their band, allowing them to push forward. They are equipped with either a select-fire assault rifle or DMR and have access to all grenades.
Support - The support class' main role is to provide heavy suppressive fire against enemy targets. They are equipped with either an LMG or select-fire assault rifle and have limited access to grenades. Machine Gunner - The machine gunner's main role is to provide heavy suppressive fire against enemy targets. They are equipped with either an LMG or select-fire assault rifle and have limited access to grenades.
Mid to long range riflemen
Designated Marksman - The DM's role is to supply rapid accurate fire at distances beyond the normal engagement range of the fireteam's riflemen. They are equipped with a DMR, assault rifle, or sniper rifle, normally attached with a telescopic sight, and have access to all grenades. Sharpshooter - The sharpshooter's role is to supply rapid accurate fire at distances beyond the normal engagement range of the cell's riflemen. They are equipped with either a bolt-action sniper rifle, DMR, or select-fire assault rifle, normally attached with a telescopic sight, and have limited access to grenades.
Sniper - The sniper's role is to eliminate enemy targets from concealed positions or long distances. They are equipped with either a bolt-action sniper rifle or DMR, normally attached with a telescopic sight, and have access to all grenades. Sniper - The Insurgent sniper's role is very similar to the sharpshooter's role. The sniper's role is to supply rapid accurate fire at distances beyond the normal engagement range of the cell's riflemen. Unlike sharpshooters, snipers do not have access to the AKM select-fire assault rifle. They are equipped with either a bolt-action sniper rifle, DMR, or select-fire assault rifle, normally attached with a telescopic sight, and have limited access to grenades.
Explosives Experts
Breacher - The breacher is an explosives expert whose role is to destroy enemy caches and to breach and clear rooms quickly and efficiently. He is equipped with either a carbine or pdw, and has access to C4 and all grenades. Sapper - A sapper is soldier responsible for tasks such as laying mines. He is an explosives expert whose role is to destroy enemy caches and to breach and clear rooms quickly and efficiently. He is equipped with a select-fire assault rifle, PDW, or shotgun, and has access to an IED and all grenades.
Engineer - The engineer's role is similar to the breacher's role. The engineer is an explosives expert whose role is to destroy to enemy caches and to breach and clear rooms quickly and efficiently. He is equipped with a pdw or shotgun and has access to C4 and all grenades. Bomber - The bomber's role is similar to the sapper's role. The bomber is an explosives expert whose role is to destroy to enemy caches and to breach and clear rooms quickly and efficiently. He is equipped with either a select-fire assault rifle, DMR, PDW, or shotgun, and has access to an IED and all grenades.
Demolitions - The demolitionist is an explosives expert whose role is to clear heavily enemy occupied areas and destroy enemy caches. Unlike the breacher and engineer, the demolitions class has access to the AT4 rocket launcher and carbine/assault rifle with the option of mounting an underbarrel grenade launcher. They have access to all grenades. Striker - The demolitionist is an explosives expert whose role is to clear heavily enemy occupied areas and destroy enemy caches. Surprisingly, he is also the most versatile soldier on the Insurgent team. Unlike the sapper and bomber, the demolitionist has access to the RPG-7 rocket launcher, but he does not have access to shotguns. He is equipped with a select-fire assault rifle, PDW, or DMR, and has access to the RPG-7 rocket launcher, the IED, and all grenades.
Special
VIP - a special class only available in Ambush missions.

Maps and Gamemodes[]

Insurgency features a total of 13 maps, a number which has been expanding through free updates since launch.

Weapons and Equipment[]

The game features 20 available weapons, each with their own sets of accessories and attachments. Equipment may be used to further customize a player's loadout.

Factions[]

Insurgency, like its predecessor, pits two enemy factions against one another. The game features the Security Forces fighting the Insurgent Forces.

Gameplay Mechanics[]

Insurgency has several game mechanics that makes the title unique from other first person shooters. Generally speaking, the mechanics of Insurgency are a mixture of arcade-oriented shooters such as Counter-Strike, Call of Duty, Battlefield and more realism-focused games such as the Red Orchestra and ARMA series, but overall, the game's goal is closer to realism. Due to this interesting combination, gameplay involves fast and tactical movement, as eliminating the enemy and capturing objectives are equally important. 

Content Updates and DLC[]

Molotov Spring[]

Released March 27, 2014, this content update added two maps, four game modes, the FAL assault rifle, the AN-M14 incendiary grenade, two optic attachments, a single player practice mode, updated coop, as well as general updates.

Sinjar[]

Released June 4, 2014, this content update added the Sinjar map, the M14 EBR battle rifle, the integration of mod support, as well as general updates.

Hunt[]

Released August 4, 2014, this content update added the Panj map, a new coop Hunt gamemode, underbarrel grenade launchers (M203, GP-25), the Red Dot optic, and various updates accross the board.

Nightfall[]

Released October 29, 2014, this content update added the M4A1 carbine, the AK-74 assault rifle, the Flare Gun, night maps, Night Vision Goggles, and revises several of the existing weapon models.

Update 12/12/2014[]

Released December 12, 2014, this unnamed content update added the M45 and M1911 pistols, improvements to Survival gameplay, and other miscellaneous changes. It also includes new night versions of Buhriz and Revolt, as well as gameplay changes to Revolt. New Survival maps Sinjar, Verticality, and Heights have also been included. The full changelist with specific update details can be found here on Steam.

Achievements[]

Main article: Insurgency Achievements

Reception[]

The first reviews for Insurgency were mixed or above average. Insurgency received an average of 75 on Metacritic[2]. Note that there have been significant changes to the game since these reviews were written.

  • Gamespot gave the game a 7.0 out of 10[3], saying that "intense tactical encounters filled with firefights and flying bodies prove thrilling enough to make it easy to look beyond Insurgency's less impressive visual design. The team dynamic and unique squad system inject something different into the mix too, offering match after match of absorbing cooperative killing that proves good looks aren't everything."
  • IGN gave the game a 7.5 out of 10[4], saying that "it’s slow, and methodical, and there isn’t a grindable unlock or weapon crate to be found. It attempts to make you think about every step you take and every slight weapon tweak, but the odd hitboxes and frustrating lack of saved loadouts undermines some of the good work."
  • PC Gamer gave the game a 77 out of 100[5], saying that "there may be prettier and more heavily populated first person shooters, but few reward teamwork as well as Insurgency."

Soundtrack[]

Main article: Insurgency Original Soundtrack

Media[]

Official Insurgency Early Access Teaser

Official Insurgency Early Access Teaser

External links[]

Sours: https://insurgency.fandom.com/wiki/Insurgency

"Insurgent" and "insurgence" redirect here. For other uses, see Insurgent (disambiguation).

An insurgency is an armed rebellion against a constituted authority (for example, an authority recognized as such by the United Nations) when those taking part in the rebellion are not recognized as belligerents.[1] An insurgency can be fought via counter-insurgency warfare, and may also be opposed by measures to protect the population, and by political and economic actions of various kinds aimed at undermining the insurgents' claims against the incumbent regime.[2] The nature of insurgencies is an ambiguous concept.

Not all rebellions are insurgencies. There have been many cases of non-violent rebellions, using civil resistance, as in the People Power Revolution in the Philippines in the 1980s that ousted President Marcos and the Egyptian Revolution of 2011.[3] Where a revolt takes the form of armed rebellion, it may not be viewed as an insurgency if a state of belligerency exists between one or more sovereign states and rebel forces. For example, during the American Civil War, the Confederate States of America was not recognized as a sovereign state, but it was recognized as a belligerent power, and thus Confederate warships were given the same rights as United States warships in foreign ports.[4][5][6]

When insurgency is used to describe a movement's unlawfulness by virtue of not being authorized by or in accordance with the law of the land, its use is neutral. However when it is used by a state or another authority under threat, "insurgency" often also carries an implication that the rebels' cause is illegitimate, whereas those rising up will see the authority itself as being illegitimate. Criticisms of widely held ideas and actions about insurgency started to occur in works of the 1960s;[7] they are still common in recent studies.[8]

Sometimes there may be one or more simultaneous insurgencies (multipolar) occurring in a country. The Iraq insurgency is one example of a recognized government versus multiple groups of insurgents. Other historic insurgencies, such as the Russian Civil War, have been multipolar rather than a straightforward model made up of two sides. During the Angolan Civil War there were two main sides: MPLA and UNITA. At the same time, there was another separatist movement for the independence of the Cabinda region headed up by FLEC. Multipolarity extends the definition of insurgency to situations where there is no recognized authority, as in the Somali Civil War, especially the period from 1998 to 2006, where it broke into quasi-autonomous smaller states, fighting among one another in changing alliances.

Definition[]

If there is a rebellion against the authority (for example an authority recognized as such by the United Nations) and those taking part in the rebellion are not recognized as belligerents then the rebellion is an insurgency.[1] However not all rebellions are insurgencies, as state of belligerency may exist between one or more sovereign states and rebel forces. For example, during the American Civil War, the Confederate States of America was not recognized as a sovereign state, but it was recognized as a belligerent power, and thus Confederate warships were given the same rights as United States warships in foreign ports.

When insurgency is used to describe a movement's unlawfulness by virtue of not being authorized by or in accordance with the law of the land, its use is neutral. However when it is used by a state or another authority under threat, "insurgency" often also carries an implication that the rebels cause is illegitimate, whereas those rising up will see the authority itself as being illegitimate.

The use of the term insurgency does recognize the political motivation of those who participate in an insurgency, while the term brigandry implies no political motivation. If an uprising has little support (for example those who continue to resist towards the end of an armed conflict when most of their allies have surrendered) then such a resistance may be described as brigandry and those who participate as brigands.[9][10]

The distinction on whether an uprising is an insurgency or a belligerency has not been as clearly codified as many other areas covered by the internationally accepted laws of war for two reasons. The first is that international law traditionally does not encroach on matters that are solely the internal affairs of a sovereign state (although recent developments such as the responsibility to protect is starting to undermine this traditional approach). The second is because at the Hague Conference of 1899 there was disagreement between the Great Powers who considered francs-tireurs to be unlawful combatants subject to execution on capture and smaller states who maintained that they should be considered lawful combatants. The dispute resulted in a compromise wording being included in the Hague Conventions known as the Martens Clause after the diplomat who drafted the clause.[11]

The Third Geneva Convention, as well as the other Geneva Conventions, are oriented to conflict involving nation-states, and only loosely address irregular forces:

Members of other militias and members of other volunteer corps, including those of organized resistance movements, belonging to a Party to the conflict and operating in or outside their own territory, even if this territory is occupied, provided that such militias or volunteer corps, including such organized resistance movements...[12]

The United States Department of Defense (DOD) defines it as "An organized movement aimed at the overthrow of a constituted government through use of subversion and armed conflict."[13] The United States counterinsurgency Field Manual,[14] proposes a structure that includes both insurgency and counterinsurgency [COIN] (italics in original):

Insurgency and its tactics are as old as warfare itself. Joint doctrine defines an insurgency as an organized movement aimed at the overthrow of a constituted government through the use of subversion and armed conflict.[13] These definitions are a good starting point, but they do not properly highlight a key paradox: though insurgency and COIN are two sides of a phenomenon that has been called revolutionary war or internal war, they are distinctly different types of operations. In addition, insurgency and COIN are included within a broad category of conflict known as irregular warfare.

This definition does not consider the morality of the conflict, or the different viewpoints of the government and the insurgents. It is focused more on the operational aspects of the types of actions taken by the insurgents and the counter-insurgents.

The Department of Defense’s (DOD) definition focuses on the type of violence employed (unlawful) towards specified ends (political, religious or ideological). This characterization fails to address the argument from moral relativity that “one man’s terrorist is another man’s freedom fighter.” In essence, this objection to a suitable definition submits that while violence may be “unlawful” in accordance with a victim’s statutes, the cause served by those committing the acts may represent a positive good in the eyes of neutral observers.

—Michael F. Morris[15]

The French expert on Indochina and Vietnam, Bernard Fall, who wrote Street Without Joy,[16] said that "revolutionary warfare" (guerrilla warfare plus political action) might be a more accurate term to describe small wars such as insurgencies.[17] Insurgency has been used for years in professional military literature. Under the British, the situation in Malaya (now Malaysia) was often called the "Malayan insurgency"[18] or "the Troubles" in Northern Ireland. Insurgencies have existed in many countries and regions, including the Philippines, Indonesia, Afghanistan, Chechnya, Kashmir, Northeast India, Yemen, Djibouti, Colombia, Sri Lanka, and Democratic Republic of the Congo, the American colonies of Great Britain, and the Confederate States of America.[19] Each had different specifics but share the property of an attempt to disrupt the central government by means considered illegal by that government. North points out, however, that insurgents today need not be part of a highly organized movement:

Some are networked with only loose objectives and mission-type orders to enhance their survival. Most are divided and factionalized by area, composition, or goals. Strike one against the current definition of insurgency. It is not relevant to the enemies we face today. Many of these enemies do not currently seek the overthrow of a constituted government...weak government control is useful and perhaps essential for many of these “enemies of the state” to survive and operate."[20]

Tactics[]

Insurgencies differ in their use of tactics and methods. In a 2004 article, Robert R. Tomes spoke of four elements that "typically encompass an insurgency":[21]

  1. cell-networks that maintain secrecy
  2. terrorism used to foster insecurity among the population and drive them to the insurgents for protection
  3. multifaceted attempts to cultivate support in the general population, often by undermining the new regime
  4. attacks against the government

Tomes' is an example of a definition that does not cover all insurgencies. For example, the French Revolution had no cell system, and in the American Revolution, little to no attempt was made to terrorize civilians. In consecutive coups in 1977 and 1999 in Pakistan, the initial actions focused internally on the government rather than on seeking broad support. While Tomes' definition fits well with Mao's Phase I,[22] it does not deal well with larger civil wars. Mao does assume terrorism is usually part of the early phases, but it is not always present in revolutionary insurgency.

Tomes offers an indirect definition of insurgency, drawn from Trinquier's definition of counterinsurgency: "an interlocking system of actions—political, economic, psychological, military—that aims at the [insurgents’ intended] overthrow of the established authority in a country and its replacement by another regime."[23]

Steven Metz[24] observes that past models of insurgency do not perfectly fit modern insurgency, in that current instances are far more likely to have a multinational or transnational character than those of the past. Several insurgencies may belong to more complex conflicts, involving "third forces (armed groups which affect the outcome, such as militias) and fourth forces (unarmed groups which affect the outcome, such as international media), who may be distinct from the core insurgents and the recognized government. While overt state sponsorship becomes less common, sponsorship by transnational groups is more common. "The nesting of insurgency within complex conflicts associated with state weakness or failure..." (See the discussion of failed states below.) Metz suggests that contemporary insurgencies have far more complex and shifting participation than traditional wars, where discrete belligerents seek a clear strategic victory.

Terrorism[]

Main article: Terrorism

Not all insurgencies include terrorism, with the caveat that there is no universally accepted definition of terrorism. While there is no accepted definition in international law, United Nations-sponsored working definitions include one drafted by Alex P. Schmid for the Policy Working Group on the United Nations and Terrorism. Reporting to the Secretary-General in 2002, the Working Group stated the following:

Without attempting a comprehensive definition of terrorism, it would be useful to delineate some broad characteristics of the phenomenon. Terrorism is, in most cases, essentially a political act. It is meant to inflict dramatic and deadly injury on civilians

and to create an atmosphere of fear, generally for a political or ideological (whether secular or religious) purpose. Terrorism is a criminal act, but it is more than mere criminality. To overcome the problem of terrorism it is necessary to understand its political nature as well as its basic criminality and psychology. The United Nations needs to address both sides of this equation.[25]

Yet another conflict of definitions involves insurgency versus terrorism. The winning essay of the 24th Annual United StatesChairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Strategic Essay Contest, by Michael F. Morris, said [A pure terrorist group] "may pursue political, even revolutionary, goals, but their violence replaces rather than complements a political program."[15] Morris made the point that the use, or non-use, of terrorism does not define insurgency, "but that organizational traits have traditionally provided another means to tell the two apart. Insurgencies normally field fighting forces orders of magnitude larger than those of terrorist organizations." Insurgencies have a political purpose, and may provide social services and have an overt, even legal, political wing. Their covert wing carries out attacks on military forces with tactics such as raids and ambushes, as well as acts of terror such as attacks that cause deliberate civilian casualties.

Mao considered terrorism a basic part of his first part of the three phases of revolutionary warfare.[22] Several insurgency models recognize that completed acts of terrorism widen the security gap; the Marxist guerrilla theoretician Carlos Marighella specifically recommended acts of terror, as a means of accomplishing something that fits the concept of opening the security gap.[26] Mao considered terrorism to be part of forming a guerilla movement.

Subversion[]

Main article: Subversion

While not every insurgency involves terror, most involve an equally hard to define tactic, subversion. "When a country is being subverted it is not being outfought; it is being out-administered. Subversion is literally administration with a minus sign in front."[17] The exceptional cases of insurgency without subversion are those when there is no accepted government that is providing administrative services.

While it is less commonly used by current U.S. spokesmen, that may be due to the hyperbolic way it was used in the past, in a specifically anticommunist context. U.S. Secretary of State Dean Rusk did in April 1962, when he declared that urgent action was required before the “enemy’s subversive politico-military teams find fertile spawning grounds for their fish eggs.”[27]

In a Western context, Rosenau cites a British Secret Intelligence Service definition as "a generalized intention to (emphasis added) “overthrow or undermine parliamentary democracy by political, industrial or violent means.” While insurgents do not necessarily use terror, it is hard to imagine any insurgency meeting its goals without undermining aspects of the legitimacy or power of the government or faction it opposes. Rosenau mentions a more recent definition that suggests subversion includes measures short of violence, which still serve the purposes of insurgents.[27] Rarely, subversion alone can change a government; this arguably happened in the liberalization of Eastern Europe.[citation needed] To the Communist government of Poland, Solidarity appeared subversive but not violent.[citation needed]

Political rhetoric, myths and models[]

In arguing against the term Global War on Terror, Francis Fukuyama said the United States was not fighting terrorism generically, as in Chechnya or Palestine. Rather, he said the slogan "war on terror" is directed at "radical Islamism, a movement that makes use of culture for political objectives." He suggested it might be deeper than the ideological conflict of the Cold War, but it should not be confused with Samuel P. Huntington's "clash of civilizations". Addressing Huntington's thesis,[28] Fukuyama stressed that the United States and its allies need to focus on specific radical groups, rather than clash with global Islam.

Fukuyama argued that political means, rather than direct military measures, are the most effective ways to defeat that insurgency.[29]David Kilcullen wrote "We must distinguish Al Qa’eda and the broader militant movements it symbolises – entities that use terrorism – from the tactic of terrorism itself."[30]

There may be utility in examining a war not specifically on the tactic of terror, but in coordination among multiple national or regional insurgencies. It may be politically infeasible to refer to a conflict as an "insurgency" rather than by some more charged term, but military analysts, when concepts associated with insurgency fit, should not ignore those ideas in their planning. Additionally, the recommendations can be applied to the strategic campaign, even if it is politically unfeasible to use precise terminology.[31] While it may be reasonable to consider transnational insurgency, Anthony Cordesman points out some of the myths in trying to have a worldwide view of terror:[32]

  • Cooperation can be based on trust and common values: One man’s terrorist is another man’s freedom fighter.
  • A definition of terrorism exists that can be accepted by all.
  • Intelligence can be freely shared.
  • Other states can be counted on to keep information secure, and use it to mutual advantage.
  • International institutions are secure and trustworthy.
  • Internal instability and security issues do not require compartmentation and secrecy at national level.
  • The “war on terrorism” creates common priorities and needs for action.
  • Global and regional cooperation is the natural basis for international action.
  • Legal systems are compatible enough for cooperation.
  • Human rights and rule of law differences do not limit cooperation.
  • Most needs are identical.
  • Cooperation can be separated from financial needs and resources

Social scientists, soldiers, and sources of change have been modeling insurgency for nearly a century, if one starts with Mao.[22] Counterinsurgency models, not mutually exclusive from one another, come from Kilcullen, McCormick, Barnett and Eizenstat. Kilcullen describes the "pillars" of a stable society, while Eizenstat addresses the "gaps" that form cracks in societal stability. McCormick's model shows the interplay among the actors: insurgents, government, population and external organizations. Barnett discusses the relationship of the country with the outside world, and Cordesman focuses on the specifics of providing security.

Recent studies have tried to model the conceptual architecture of insurgent warfare using computational and mathematical modelling. A recent study by Juan Camilo Bohorquez, Sean Gourley, Alexander R. Dixon, Michael Spagat, and Neil F. Johnson entitled "Common Ecology Quantifies Human Insurgency", suggests a common structure for 9 contemporary insurgent wars, supported on statistical data of more than 50,000 insurgent attacks.[33] The model explains the recurrent statistical pattern found in the distribution of deaths in insurgent and terrorist events.[34]

Kilcullen's pillars[]

Kilcullen describes a framework for counterinsurgency. He gives a visual overview[35] of the actors in his model of conflicts, which he represents as a box containing an "ecosystem" defined by geographic, ethnic, economic, social, cultural, and religious characteristics. Inside the box are, among others, governments, counterinsurgent forces, insurgent leaders, insurgent forces, and the general population, which is made up of three groups:

  1. those committed to the insurgents;
  2. those committed to the counterinsurgents;
  3. those who simply wish to get on with their lives.

Often, but not always, states or groups that aid one side or the other are outside the box. Outside-the-box intervention has dynamics of its own.[36]

The counterinsurgency strategy can be described as efforts to end the insurgency by a campaign developed in balance along three "pillars": security, political, and economical.

"Obviously enough, you cannot command what you do not control. Therefore, unity of command (between agencies or among government and non-government actors) means little in this environment." Unity of command is one of the axioms of military doctrine[37] that change with the use of swarming:.[38] In Edwards' swarming model, as in Kilcullen's mode, unity of command becomes "unity of effort at best, and collaboration or deconfliction at least."[35]

As in swarming, in Kilcullen's view unity of effort "depends less on a shared command and control hierarchy, and more on a shared diagnosis of the problem (i.e., the distributed knowledge of swarms), platforms for collaboration, information sharing and deconfliction. Each player must understand the others’ strengths, weaknesses, capabilities and objectives, and inter-agency teams must be structured for versatility (the ability to perform a wide variety of tasks) and agility (the ability to transition rapidly and smoothly between tasks)."

Eizenstat and closing gaps[]

Insurgencies, according to Stuart Eizenstat grow out of "gaps".[39] To be viable, a state must be able to close three "gaps", of which the first is most important:

  • Security: protection "... against internal and external threats, and preserving sovereignty over territory. If a government cannot ensure security, rebellious armed groups or criminal nonstate actors may use violence to exploit this security gap—as in Haiti, Nepal, and Somalia."
  • Capacity: the survival needs of water, electrical power, food and public health, closely followed by education, communications and a working economic system.[40] "An inability to do so creates a capacity gap, which can lead to a loss of public confidence and then perhaps political upheaval. In most environments, a capacity gap coexists with—or even grows out of—a security gap. In Afghanistan and the Democratic Republic of the Congo, for example, segments of the population are cut off from their governments because of endemic insecurity. And in postconflict Iraq, critical capacity gaps exist despite the country’s relative wealth and strategic importance."[41]
  • Legitimacy: closing the legitimacy gap is more than an incantation of "democracy" and "elections", but a government that is perceived to exist by the consent of the governed, has minimal corruption, and has a working law enforcement and judicial system that enforce human rights.

Note the similarity between Eizenstat's gaps and Kilcullen's three pillars.[35] In the table below, do not assume that a problematic state is unable to assist less developed states while closing its own gaps.

State type Needs Representative examples
Militarily strong but weak in other institutions Lower tensions before working on gaps Cuba, North Korea
Good performers Continuing development of working institutions. Focused private investment El Salvador, Ghana, Mongolia, Senegal, Nicaragua, Uganda
Weak states Close one or two gaps Afghanistan, Egypt, Indonesia, Iraq, Ivory Coast, Kazakhstan, Pakistan, Kyrgyzstan, Myanmar, Republic of the Congo, Sudan, Syria, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan, Zimbabwe
Failed states Close all gaps Angola, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Haiti, Liberia, Palestine, Somalia

McCormick Magic Diamond[]

McCormick’s model[42] is designed as a tool for counterinsurgency (COIN), but develops a symmetrical view of the required actions for both the Insurgent and COIN forces to achieve success. In this way the counterinsurgency model can demonstrate how both the insurgent and COIN forces succeed or fail. The model’s strategies and principle apply to both forces, therefore the degree the forces follow the model should have a direct correlation to the success or failure of either the Insurgent or COIN force.

The model depicts four key elements or players:

  1. Insurgent force
  2. Counterinsurgency force (i.e., the government)
  3. Population
  4. International community

All of these interact, and the different elements have to assess their best options in a set of actions:

  1. Gaining support of the population
  2. Disrupt opponent’s control over the population
  3. Direct action against opponent
  4. Disrupt opponent’s relations with the international community
  5. Establish relationships with the international community

Barnett and connecting to the core[]

In Thomas Barnett's paradigm,[43] the world is divided into a "connected core" of nations enjoying a high level of communications among their organizations and individuals, and those nations that are disconnected internally and externally. In a reasonably peaceful situation, he describes a "system administrator" force, often multinational, which does what some call "nation-building", but, most importantly, connects the nation to the core and empowers the natives to communicate—that communication can be likened to swarm coordination. If the state is occupied, or in civil war, another paradigm comes into play: the leviathan, a first-world military force that takes down the opposition regular forces. Leviathan is not constituted to fight local insurgencies, but major forces. Leviathan may use extensive swarming at the tactical level, but its dispatch is a strategic decision that may be made unilaterally, or by an established group of the core such as NATO or ASEAN.

Cordesman and security[]

Other than brief "Leviathan" takedowns, security building appears to need to be regional, with logistical and other technical support from more developed countries and alliances (e.g., ASEAN, NATO). Noncombat military assistance in closing the security gap begins with training, sometimes in specialized areas such as intelligence. More direct, but still noncombat support, includes intelligence, planning, logistics and communications.

Anthony Cordesman notes that security requirements differ by region and state in region. Writing on the Middle East, he identified different security needs for specific areas, as well as the US interest in security in those areas.[32]

  • In North Africa, the US focus should be on security cooperation in achieving regional stability and in counterterrorism.
  • In the Levant, the US must largely compartment security cooperation with Israel and cooperation with friendly Arab states like Egypt, Jordan, and Lebanon, but can improve security cooperation with all these states.
  • In the Persian Gulf, the US must deal with the strategic importance of a region whose petroleum and growing gas exports fuel key elements of the global economy.

It is well to understand that counterterrorism, as used by Cordesman, does not mean using terrorism against the terrorism, but an entire spectrum of activities, nonviolent and violent, to disrupt an opposing terrorist organization. The French general, Joseph Gallieni, observed, while a colonial administrator in 1898,

A country is not conquered and pacified when a military operation has decimated its inhabitants and made all heads bow in terror; the ferments of revolt will germinate in the mass and the rancours accumulated by the brutal action of force will make them grow again[44]

Both Kilcullen and Eizenstat define a more abstract goal than does Cordesman. Kilcullen's security pillar is roughly equivalent to Eizenstat's security gap:

  • Military security (securing the population from attack or intimidation by guerrillas, bandits, terrorists or other armed groups)
  • Police security (community policing, police intelligence or "Special Branch" activities, and paramilitary police field forces).
  • Human security, building a framework of human rights, civil institutions and individual protections, public safety (fire, ambulance, sanitation, civil defense) and population security.

This pillar most engages military commanders' attention, but of course military means are applied across the model, not just in the security domain, while civilian activity is critically important in the security pillar also ... all three pillars must develop in parallel and stay in balance, while being firmly based in an effective information campaign.[35]

Anthony Cordesman, while speaking of the specific situation in Iraq, makes some points that can be generalized to other nations in turmoil.[45] Cordesman recognizes some value in the groupings in Samuel P. Huntington's idea of the clash of civilizations,[28] but, rather assuming the civilizations must clash, these civilizations simply can be recognized as actors in a multinational world. In the case of Iraq, Cordesman observes that the burden is on the Islamic civilization, not unilaterally the West, if for no other reason that the civilization to which the problematic nation belongs will have cultural and linguistic context that Western civilization cannot hope to equal.

The heart of strengthening weak nations must come from within, and that heart will fail if they deny that the real issue is the future of their civilization, if they tolerate religious, cultural or separatist violence and terrorism when it strikes at unpopular targets, or if they continue to try to export the blame for their own failures to other nations, religions, and cultures.

Counterinsurgency[]

See also: Counter-insurgency and Foreign internal defense

Before one counters an insurgency, however, one must understand what one is countering. Typically the most successful counterinsurgencies have been the British in the Malay Emergency[46] and the Filipino government's countering of the Huk Rebellion.

See also[]

[]

  1. 1.01.1Oxford English Dictionary second edition 1989 "insurgent B. n. One who rises in revolt against constituted authority; a rebel who is not recognized as a belligerent."
  2. ↑These points are emphasized in many works on insurgency, including Peter Paret, French Revolutionary Warfare from Indochina to Algeria: The Analysis of a Political and Military Doctrine, Pall Mall Press, London, 1964.
  3. ↑Roberts, Adam and Timothy Garton Ash (eds.), Civil Resistance and Power Politics: The Experience of Non-violent Action from Gandhi to the Present, Oxford University Press, 2009. See [1]. Includes chapters by specialists on the various movements.
  4. ↑Hall, Kermit L. The Oxford Guide to United States Supreme Court Decisions, Oxford University Press US, 2001 ISBN 0-19-513924-0, ISBN 978-0-19-513924-2p. 246 "In supporting Lincoln on this issue, the Supreme Court upheld his theory of the Civil War as an insurrection against the United States government that could be suppressed according to the rules of war. In this way the United States was able to fight the war as if it were an international war, without actually having to recognize the de jure existence of the Confederate government."
  5. ↑Staff. Bureau of Public Affairs: Office of the Historian -> Timeline of U.S. Diplomatic History -> 1861-1865:The Blockade of Confederate Ports, 1861-1865, U.S. State Department. "Following the U.S. announcement of its intention to establish an official blockade of Confederate ports, foreign governments began to recognize the Confederacy as a belligerent in the Civil War. Great Britain granted belligerent status on May 13, 1861, Spain on June 17, and Brazil on August 1. Other foreign governments issued statements of neutrality."
  6. ↑Goldstein, Erik; McKercher, B. J. C. Power and stability: British foreign policy, 1865-1965, Routledge, 2003 ISBN 0-7146-8442-2, ISBN 978-0-7146-8442-0. p. 63
  7. ↑See, for example, Franklin Mark Osanka, ed., Modern Guerrilha Warfare (New York: Free Press, 1962): Peter Paret and John W. Shy, Guerrilhas in the 1960's (New York: Praeger, 1962); Harry Eckstein, ed., Internal War: Problem and Approaches (New York: Free Press, 1964); and Henry Bienen, Violence and Social Change (Chicago: Chicago University Press, 1968).
  8. ↑Examples are Douglas Blaufarb, The Counter-Insurgency Era: U.S. Doctrine and Performance (New York: Free Press, 1977), and D. Michael Shafer, Deadly Paradigmes: The Failure of U.S. Counterinsurgency Policy (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1988).
  9. ↑Francis Lieber, Richard Shelly Hartigan Lieber's Code and the Law of War, Transaction Publishers, 1983 ISBN 0-913750-25-5, ISBN 978-0-913750-25-4. p. 95
  10. ↑Oxford English Dictionary second edition 1989 brigandry "1980 Guardian Weekly 28 Dec. 14/2 Today the rebels wound, mutilate, and kill civilians: where do you draw the fine line between subversion and brigandry?"
  11. ↑Ticehurst, Rupert. The Martens Clause and the Laws of Armed Conflict 30 April 1997, International Review of the Red Cross no 317, p.125-134 ISSN 1560-7755. Ticehurst in footnote 1 cites The life and works of Martens are detailed by V. Pustogarov, "Fyodor Fyodorovich Martens (1845-1909) — A Humanist of Modern Times", International Review of the Red Cross (IRRC), No. 312, May–June 1996, pp. 300-314. Also Ticehurst in his footnote 2 cites F. Kalshoven, Constraints on the Waging of War, Martinus Nijhoff, Dordrecht, 1987, p. 14.
  12. ↑"Convention (III) relative to the Treatment of Prisoners of War (Third Geneva Convention)". 12 August 1949. http://www.icrc.org/ihl.nsf/FULL/375?OpenDocument. 
  13. 13.013.1US Department of Defense (12 July 2007). "Joint Publication 1-02 Department of Defense Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms" (PDF). JP 1-02. http://www.dtic.mil/doctrine/jel/new_pubs/jp1_02.pdf. Retrieved 2007-11-21. 
  14. ↑Nagl, John A.; Petraeus, David H.; Amos, James F.; Sewall, Sarah (December 2006). "FM 3-24 Counterinsurgency" (PDF). US Department of the Army. http://www.fas.org/irp/doddir/army/fm3-24.pdf. Retrieved 2008-02-03. 
  15. 15.015.1Morris, Michael F. (2005). "Al Qaeda as Insurgency" (PDF). United StatesArmy War College. http://www.strategicstudiesinstitute.army.mil/pdffiles/ksil234.pdf. 
  16. ↑Fall, Bernard B. (1994). "Street Without Joy: The French debacle in Indochina". Stackpole. ISBN 978-0-8117-3236-9. 
  17. 17.017.1Fall, Bernard B. (April 1965 Issue). "The Theory and Practice of Insurgency and Counterinsurgency". http://www.au.af.mil/au/awc/awcgate/navy/art5-w98.htm. 
  18. ↑Grau, Lester W. (May–June, 2004). "Counterinsurgency Lessons from Malaya and Vietnam: Learning to Eat Soup with a Knife". http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0PBZ/is_2004_May-June/ai_n6123976. 
  19. ↑Anderson, Edward G., Jr. (August 2007). "A Proof-of-Concept Model for Evaluating Insurgency Management Policies Using the System Dynamics Methodology". http://www.ccc.nps.navy.mil/si/2007/Aug/andersonAug07.asp. 
  20. ↑North, Chris (January–February 2008). "Redefining Insurgency" (PDF). U.S. Army Combined Arms Center. http://usacac.army.mil/CAC/milreview/English/JanFeb08/NorthINSIGHTSJanFeb08.pdf. 
  21. ↑Tomes, Robert R. (2004). "Relearning Counterinsurgency Warfare" (PDF). United States Army War College. http://www.carlisle.army.mil/USAWC/PARAMETERS/04spring/tomes.pdf. 
  22. 22.022.122.2Mao Tse-tung (1967). "On Protracted War". Selected Works of Mao Tse-tung. Foreign Languages Press. http://www.marx2mao.com/Mao/PW38.html. 
  23. ↑Trinquier, Roger (1961). "Modern Warfare: A French View of Counterinsurgency". Editions de la Table Ronde. http://www-cgsc.army.mil/carl/resources/csi/trinquier/trinquier.asp. 
  24. ↑Metz, Steven (5 June 2007). "Rethinking Insurgency". Strategic Studies Institute, U.S. Army War College. http://www.strategicstudiesinstitute.army.mil/Pubs/display.cfm?pubID=790. 
  25. ↑Secretary General's Policy Working Group on the United Nations and Terrorism (December 2004). "Preface" (PDF). (A/57/273-S/2002/875, annex). http://www.unodc.org/documents/data-and-analysis/Forum/V05-81059_EBOOK.pdf. 
  26. ↑Marighella, Carlos (1969). "Minimanual of the Urban Guerrilla". http://www.marxists.org/archive/marighella-carlos/1969/06/minimanual-urban-guerrilla/index.htm. 
  27. 27.027.1Rosenau, William (2007). "Subversion and Insurgency". RAND National Defense Research Institute. 
  28. 28.028.1Huntington, Samuel P. (1996). The Clash of Civilizations and the Remaking of World Order. Simon & Schuster. ISBN 0684811642. 
  29. ↑Fukuyama, Francis (May 2003). "Phase III in the War on Terrorism: Challenges and Opportunities" (PDF). Brookings Institution. http://www.brook.edu/comm/events/summary20030514.pdf. 
  30. ↑Kilcullen, David (2004). "Countering Global Insurgency: A Strategy for the War on Terrorism" (PDF). http://www.smallwars.quantico.usmc.mil/search/articles/counteringglobalinsurgency.pdf. 
  31. ↑Canonico, Peter J. (December 2004). "An Alternate Military Strategy for the War on Terrorism" (PDF). U.S. Naval Postgraduate School. http://www.ccc.nps.navy.mil/research/theses/canonico04.pdf 
  32. 32.032.1Cordesman, Anthony H. (29 October 2007). "Security Cooperation in the Middle East". Center for Strategic and International Studies. http://www.csis.org/component/option,com_csis_pubs/task,view/id,4139/type,1/. [dead link]
  33. ↑Bohorquez et al. (December 2009). "Common Ecology Quantifies Human Insurgency". Nature. http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v462/n7275/full/nature08631.html. 
  34. ↑Clauset A, Gleditsch KS (2012). "The Developmental Dynamics of Terrorist Organizations". PLoS One. http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0048633. 
  35. 35.035.135.235.335.4Kilcullen, David (28 September 2006). "Three Pillars of Counterinsurgency" (PDF). http://www.au.af.mil/au/awc/awcgate/uscoin/3pillars_of_counterinsurgency.pdf. 
  36. ↑Lynn, John A. (July–August 2005). "Patterns of Insurgency and Counterinsurgency" (PDF). http://usacac.army.mil/CAC/milreview/download/English/JulAug05/lynn.pdf. 
  37. ↑Headquarters, Department of the Army (22 February 2011) [27 February 2008] (PDF). FM 3–0, Operations (with included Change 1). Washington, DC: GPO. http://www.fas.org/irp/doddir/army/fm3-0.pdf. Retrieved 31 August 2013. 
  38. ↑Edwards, Sean J.A. (September 2004). "Swarming and the Future of War". Pardee RAND Graduate School. http://www.rand.org/pubs/rgs_dissertations/RGSD189/. 
  39. ↑Eizenstat, Stuart E.; John Edward Porter and Jeremy M. Weinstein (January/February 2005). "Rebuilding Weak States" (PDF). http://www.cgdev.org/doc/commentary/15_Eizenstat.pdf. 
  40. ↑Sagraves, Robert D (April 2005). "The Indirect Approach: the role of Aviation Foreign Internal Defense in Combating Terrorism in Weak and Failing States" (PDF). Air Command and Staff College. https://research.maxwell.af.mil/papers/ay2005/acsc/3569%20-%20Sagraves.pdf. 
  41. ↑Stuart Eizenstat et al, Rebuilding Weak States, Foreign Affairs, Council on Foreign Relations, January/February 2005. p. 136 (137 PDF)
  42. ↑McCormick, Gordon (1987). "The Shining Path and Peruvian terrorism". RAND Corporation. Document Number: P-7297. 
  43. ↑Barnett, Thomas P.M. (2005). "The Pentagon's New Map: The Pentagon's New Map: War and Peace in the Twenty-first Century". Berkley Trade. ISBN 0425202399. Barnett-2005. 
  44. ↑McClintock, Michael (November 2005). "Great Power Counterinsurgency". Human Rights First. http://www.ksg.harvard.edu/cchrp/programareas/conferences/presentations/McClintock,%20Michael.ppt. 
  45. ↑Cordesman, Anthony H. (August 1, 2006). "The Importance of Building Local Capabilities: Lessons from the Counterinsurgency in Iraq". Center for Strategic and International Studies. http://www.csis.org/component/option,com_csis_pubs/task,view/id,3411/type,1/. [dead link]
  46. ↑Thomas Willis, "Lessons from the past: successful British counterinsurgency operations in Malaya 1948–1960", July–August 2005, Infantry Magazine
Sours: https://military.wikia.org/wiki/Insurgency
  1. Lamps plus desks
  2. Best mozart album
  3. Srds com
  4. Reddit 1660 super

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}}Insurgency: Sandstorm is a tactical first-person shooter video game developed by New World Interactive and published by Focus Home Interactive for Microsoft Windows, PlayStation 4, Xbox One and macOS . It is the third installment in the Insurgency series.

Sandstorm was officially announced on February 23, 2016 by Focus Home Interactive.[4][5]

Confirmed features [6][]

  • Expanded environment scale.
  • Light vehicles for transportation and fire support.
  • New game modes designed for vehicle gameplay.
  • Competitive matchmaking, anti-cheat, and rankings system.
  • Improved ballistics system including bullet drop and travel time.
  • Interacting with the environment by climbing ladders and door breaching.

Multiplayer[]

"We're also adding some more interaction with the environment in terms of climbing ladders and breaching doorways, but also a team-based communication system so you're able to call in a drone strike or a supply drop."
— Andrew Spearin, creative director[7]

Game modes[]

Versus

Coop

To be added in updates

Single player[]

Sandstorm was originally supposed to feature a single-player story, in which the player is a female Kurdish freedom fighter.[8] However, the single player and cooperative story has been canceled for release, and will be considered again at a later date due to its high production requirements.[9] The text and images below are from http://newworldinteractive.com/insurgency-sandstorm-media-release

Sandstorm-concept-01.jpg

A few years ago, in a familiar setting, the sandy streets of an Iraqi village. The tone of Insurgency: Sandstorm’s narrative shifts the typical shooter inspiration away from blockbuster military power fantasy movies more towards a dark and understated indie film rooted in reality.

Sandstorm-concept-02.jpg

With depth to the narrative, you must look beyond the surface, away from these typical streets, behind closed doors, in a dark room to discover our female protagonist. She is enslaved by radical insurgents, along with her sister and other young girls held captive.

Sandstorm-concept-03.jpg

A sandstorm engulfs the village and fighting erupts. By chance, a hole is blown into the wall and the girls escape. In the confusion of the storm, our protagonist is separated from her sister and friends. She is alone, wandering in the desert.

Sandstorm-concept-08.jpg
Sandstorm-concept-04.jpg

Present day. Our protagonist has enlisted with a rebel faction, fighting against the radical insurgents. They push through battered villages, hitting the insurgents hard. One day, a key piece of information is discovered and our protagonist’s world is not what it seems.

Sandstorm-concept-05.jpg

She breaks free from the security of the main group to embark upon a personal quest. Accompanying her is another female fighter, her best friend who was held captive with her years earlier. Along for the journey are two foreign vigilantes: an American combat veteran of the war in the Middle East, and a French citizen who has never seen combat.

Sandstorm-concept-06.jpg

Along the path of their journey, several challenges emerge. Without a military force backing you up, that force may become an obstacle.

Sandstorm-concept-07.jpg

Essentially, the narrative is a road-trip story. It’s about these characters bonding through the many challenges that arise. Their diverse experience leads to interesting character dynamics, but ultimately their actions extend beyond their own volition.

"We are very excited to venture into the realm of storytelling to offer more depth for Insurgency. Shooters do not have to be about mindless killing, so players can stop and ask questions about the world a game represents, and find answers within the narrative. Historically, the avant garde in many art forms are who disrupt and redefine genres. For a decade Insurgency has been in that position, and we are emerging from indie obscurity to innovate the FPS genre."
— NWI[6]

Split-screen Co-op[]

Split-screen co-operative gameplay for both single player missions and online games is in development.[7] The story mode will feature four-player co-op, in which each player will take control of a character in the story.

Gallery[]

Sandstorm-Id-18

Screenshot, released 09-03-18

Sandstorm-Id-19

Screenshot, released 09-03-18

Sandstorm-Id-20

Screenshot, released 09-03-18

Sandstorm-Id-21

Screenshot, released 09-03-18

Sandstorm-Id-23

Screenshot, released 09-03-18

Sandstorm-Id-27

Screenshot, released 09-03-18

Insurgency-Sandstorm

Early logo concept

Sandstorm-1

Screenshot

Sandstorm-2

Screenshot

Insurgency041920
Bg home new

Promotional banner

Videos[]

Insurgency Sandstorm - Launch Trailer

Insurgency Sandstorm - Launch Trailer

Insurgency Sandstorm - Gameplay Overview Trailer

Insurgency Sandstorm - Gameplay Overview Trailer

Insurgency Sandstorm - Precinct Map Teaser

Insurgency Sandstorm - Precinct Map Teaser

Gamescom 2018 Insurgency Sandstorm – Gamescom Trailer

Gamescom 2018 Insurgency Sandstorm – Gamescom Trailer

Insurgency Sandstorm Raw PvP Gameplay

Insurgency Sandstorm Raw PvP Gameplay

Insurgency Sandstorm – E3 2018 Trailer PS4

Insurgency Sandstorm – E3 2018 Trailer PS4

Analyzing New Insurgency Sandstorm Footage! - New World Weekly Livestream 2 22 18

Insurgency Sandstorm - Helicopter Takedown

Insurgency Sandstorm - Helicopter Takedown

Insurgency Sandstorm - Reload Mechanics

Insurgency Sandstorm - Reload Mechanics

Reception[]

Insurgency: Sandstorm received "generally favorable" reviews on Metacritic getting a metascore of 78/100 based on 30 critic reviews.[10]

External links[]

Sours: https://insurgency.fandom.com/wiki/Insurgency:_Sandstorm
Insurgency Sandstorm - Co op ISMC modded - Hideout

Document Break-Down

When writing an object document for the Chaos Insurgency you have to keep in mind that unlike the Foundation, the Insurgency actively uses anomalous items. Due to the break down between cells and the differences in personnel class amongst the cells, Delta Command releases purely need-to-know documents. And all the Insurgency really needs to know is what to do with the anomalies, not what they are or their exact method of function.

Essentially, a member of Delta Command codenamed the "Engineer" constantly transcribes a massive list of instructions (the "Plan," and individual "Steps") without any immediate sense of correlation. Delta Command passes these instructions down to the bottom ranks of the Insurgency. The rest of Delta Command then scans and separates these Steps, and compiles relevant steps together in "Step Compilation" documents.

So those are the basics. Before you keep reading, you should probably read the "Darkness on the Face of the Deep" series. Just hop on over a couple of tabs and check it out. Because spoilers, or something. Also a lot of things won't, uh, make sense.

Let's talk about the thematic foundation of these documents. The point of this portrayal of the Chaos Insurgency is that they're all getting absolutely played by the Engine. This "object" format is supposed to embody the inherent contradictions in the nature of the Chaos Insurgency. They're an organization that purports to have as its goal the perfect understanding and integration of the anomalous—but they don’t tell their operatives anything about these paranormal objects or phenomena. There is the illusion of order—they’re following a strict series of instructions. But the reality is chaos—the average Chaos Insurgency operative has no idea what they’re doing or why. They’re just following the Engine’s plan.

Oh, also, who’s the Engineer? A member of Delta Command who’s in constant telepathic conversation with the Engine, unceasingly transcribing the Engine’s will into the Plan. Basically a mouthpiece. The Engine is the real mastermind behind everything, but nobody but Delta Command is aware of the Engine’s existence or true nature.

Just to close out, when approaching these documents, we think that it’s much more helpful for you, as a writer, not to think about an object you want to portray, but instead a story regarding that object, and even more specifically, what the Chaos Insurgency wants to do with that object. In order to portray exactly what the object is, you have to work around the knowledge blackout of the Insurgency to weave in implications, hints, or references to other parts of the Foundation universe.


DeCIRO Catalogue Number: The DeCIRO (Delta Command Intelligence Recording Office) Catalogue Number is the Chaos Insurgency's basic equivalent of the Foundation's Item Number, except that it applies to all documents.

Document Type: While "Step Compilation" will always been the Document Type at the top of the document, included sub-documents will have different Document Types. Sub-document information is detailed farther below.

Dates Received: Pretty self explanatory. Using xx-xx-xxxx (month-day-year) as a template. (ex: 04-22-1955) Keep in mind these dates correlate with the DeCIRO number of the Steps Compilation document.

Operation Status: If all the Steps on the document have been followed, and no further Steps are expected to be produced, the Operation Status is Closed. If the Insurgency is still following the Steps and/or it is suspected that more relevant Steps will be produced, the Operation Status is Open.

Foreword: Delta Command is not exactly the most sane group of individuals. The Foreword is them essentially talking to themselves (as only they would ever see the Foreword), usually through colorful language or metaphors. Useful for cluing the reader onto exposition things you wouldn't be able to easily do within the Steps.

1. STEP _ This is where the fun starts. The Steps are what the Insurgency is actually going to do with the object(s) relevant to the document. As such, descriptions aren't all too common. Instead, the Step may call for research of a particular object and then the resulting documentation of the study would be attached.


Summary Report

Post-Operation Summary Report

Covert Operations

Sours: https://scp-wiki.wikidot.com/chaos-insurgency-hub

Wikia insurgency

Insurgency: Sandstorm

Online tactical shooter video game

2018 video game

Insurgency: Sandstorm is a multiplayertacticalfirst-person shootervideo game developed by New World Interactive and published by Focus Home Interactive. The game is a sequel to the 2014 video game Insurgency. Set in an unnamed fictional Middle Eastern region, the game depicts a conflict between two factions: "Security", loosely based on various world militaries (specifically NATO forces, United States SOCOM, Iraqi Armed Forces, Afghan Armed Forces, Syrian Armed Forces, and Kurdish YPG and YPJ), and "Insurgents", loosely based on various militant groups (specifically ISIL, the Taliban, and Al-Qaeda).[1]

Insurgency: Sandstorm was officially announced in February 2016, for Microsoft Windows. It was released on December 12, 2018, for Windows, with a delayed release for console, macOS and Linux builds of the game. In December 2019, it was announced that the Linux and macOS builds of the game were cancelled.[2] The PlayStation 4 and Xbox One versions went through various delays[3][4] and were released on September 29, 2021. These versions are also playable on PlayStation 5 and Xbox Series X/S, with updates scheduled to release sometime in 2022 to take advantage of the next-gen hardware.[5]

Insurgency: Sandstorm received critical acclaim for its realistic gameplay, level design, sound design, atmosphere, graphics, and fluid animations, but was criticized for its technical issues and optimization, with some lamenting the cancellation of the planned story campaign.

Gameplay[edit]

Similar to Insurgency and Day of Infamy, Insurgency: Sandstorm features a minimal HUD, lacking a health bar, ammunition count, or minimap. The Insurgency series has "slow", tactical, realistic gameplay, with moments of intensity.[6] Weapons are accurate and extremely deadly, putting an emphasis on teamwork.[7] Like its predecessors, most game modes in Sandstorm do not feature instant respawns. Instead, on death, players must spectate and wait for their team to complete an objective in order to respawn. Improvements from Insurgency include better visuals, fire support, addition of a player progression system, character customization, cosmetic unlocks, as well as larger maps and drivable technicals.

Players are separated into two teams: Security and Insurgents. Security primarily uses modernized weaponry originating from NATO countries, such as the M4 carbine, G36K, L85A2, and MP7, while Insurgents use a mix of older and cheaper weaponry, ranging from Russian weapons like the AK-74, TOZ-194, and PKM to outdated World War II-era weapons such as the Welrod and the M1 Garand.

Players can choose from eight classes with varying armaments: Rifleman, Breacher, Advisor, Demolitions, Marksman, Gunner, Observer, and Commander. Players have limited supply points to spend on weapons and equipment. Players can modify their weapons with attachments, such as weapon sights, laser sights, bipods, muzzle attachments, suppressors, and foregrips, with additional attachments available for specific guns and classes, such as underbarrel explosive grenade launchers for Demolitions. Gas masks, night-vision goggles, rocket launchers, plastic explosives, and various types of grenades are also available. Players may change their armor and carrier, which affects their survivability and ammunition carried respectively, though both impact physical weight and movement speed.

Returning from Day of Infamy is the fire support system, which may be requested by a Commander if a friendly Observer is within 10 meters of them. Security can call for close air support, such as an A-10strafe[8] or for an AH-64 Apache or UH-60 Black Hawk to circle the area and attack visible enemies, though both of these helicopters can be shot down by enemy rocket launchers or anti-materiel rifles.[9] Insurgents can call for an improvised drone strike, rocket artillery, an IED drone that seeks out enemies and explodes when in range of one, or a chemical gas strike that kills anyone in its radius without a gas mask on. Both teams also have access to both explosive and smoke artillery; Security fires fewer rounds with greater precision, while Insurgents fire more rounds with less precision.

Game modes[edit]

Versus[edit]

  • Push: The attacking team must capture three or four objectives in sequential order. For every objective captured, more reinforcements are made available and more time is given to capture the next objective. The defenders must protect the objectives from the attackers. If the attackers are able to capture all objectives, they must find and destroy the cache. At this point, the defenders only have one life to fend off the attackers. The game ends when either team runs out of reinforcements, players, or time.
  • Firefight: Both teams must battle each other to capture all three territorial objectives. Dead players can only respawn if their team has captured an objective. A team wins if the enemy team is eliminated or if all three objectives are captured.
  • Frontline: Both teams must capture objectives one by one and then destroy the enemy cache. Players must capture the enemy objectives while also defending their own. Dead players can only respawn if their team has captured an objective. A team wins when either the entire other team is eliminated or if the enemy cache is destroyed.[10]
  • Domination: Similar to Firefight, there are three objectives which can be captured at all times. Teams receive victory points for each objective held, and the team that reaches the point threshold wins. On death, players immediately respawn in a random location on the map.[11]
  • Ambush: The defending team must protect a designated VIP player and escort them to an extraction point, while the attacking team must kill the VIP. The VIP is armed with only a pistol and cannot respawn. The attacking team wins if the VIP player is killed; the defending team wins if the VIP player arrives at the extraction point.

Co-op[edit]

  • Checkpoint: Players are placed on one team and must sequentially capture enemy objectives or destroy enemy caches while fighting computer-controlled enemies as they advance across the map, similar to Push. After capturing some enemy objectives, the enemy may initiate a counterattack, in which surviving players must defend the point against a wave of enemies; a longer counterattack will always occur on the final objective. All dead players respawn when an objective is captured. Players win when all objectives are captured and the final enemy counterattack is repelled.
  • Hardcore Checkpoint: Checkpoint with slower movement, limited equipment and supply points, no friendly player marks, and the unique disadvantage of losing the equipped loadout upon death; instead, players respawn with a very limited loadout consisting of their team's respective bolt-action rifle and a pistol, and they can only reequip their selected loadout through a supply box placed randomly in the map.
  • Outpost: Players must defend an objective from seven waves of enemies, similar to the counterattacks from Checkpoint. Every two waves consists of a special enemy wave; special enemies include armored enemies with MG 3s, suicide bombers, and enemies equipped with silenced weapons and flashbangs. If an objective is lost, players are pushed back to a different objective; if all objectives are lost, the match is lost. Players are given only two supply points at the beginning of each match, with two additional supply points given with each wave completed. Players win when all seven waves are repelled. All players are placed on Security in this mode.
  • Survival: Players must capture a series of random objectives across a map while fighting enemies. Players are given limited supply points and are only able to equip pistols on spawn. Other weapons must be acquired from enemies or from weapon cases at each captured objective that give the player a random primary weapon when opened. Like Checkpoint, the final objective always has a long enemy attack that must be repelled to allow an allied helicopter to extract the players. Players win when all objectives are captured and the final enemy attack is repelled. All players are placed on Security in this mode. Completing this mode for the first time unlocks the Battleworn and Dissident cosmetics for Security and Insurgents respectively.

Removed game modes[edit]

  • Skirmish: Like Firefight, there are three territorial objectives that both teams have to capture. Each team also has a cache to protect. If the caches of both teams are destroyed, the game will be played like Firefight. To win, the cache must be destroyed and all three objectives captured. Removed in patch 1.4.1 due to low popularity, to decrease queue times, and to allow the developers to maintain other game modes.[12]
  • Frenzy: Checkpoint with almost all enemies using knives instead of firearms. Special enemies include armored enemies that take several shots to kill, teleporting enemies that dodge attacks, and burning enemies that drop a lit Molotov cocktail on death. All players are placed on Security in this mode. Replaced by Outpost in update 1.8 due to low popularity, and converted into a Limited Time Playlist.
  • Arcade: Casual modes that were rotated out with updates, such as Team Deathmatch. Replaced by Limited Time Playlists in update 1.4.[10]
  • Competitive: Firefight in a five-versus-five ranked queue, with higher equipment costs and a different class structure. Removed in update 1.9.1 due to low popularity.

Sandstorm also includes "Limited Time Playlists", temporary casual modes that are often based on existing modes with significant gameplay-changing modifications, such as "Running in the 90s" (weapon sights are disabled and firearms point forward at all times, making gameplay similar to older shooters such as Counter-Strike and Unreal Tournament), "Team Deathmatch" (both teams fight to gain a certain amount of kills with wider loadouts and instant respawns), "Hot Potato" (live fragmentation grenades are dropped upon death), and "Task Force 666" (Frenzy on night maps only; players regain health by killing enemies). These modes are also available for custom servers.

Development[edit]

Insurgency: Sandstorm was first announced on February 23, 2016, on New World Interactive's website.[13] The game was confirmed to be on Unreal Engine 4 instead of Source like Insurgency and Day of Infamy. The fire support system from Day of Infamy was confirmed to be returning. Drivable vehicles were also confirmed, a first for the series.

Lead designer Michael Tsarouhas aimed to "find a balance" between military simulator games such as ArmA and Squad, and action games such as Call of Duty, to provide both action and realism in gameplay.[14]

Early in development, Sandstorm had a planned single-player and cooperative story campaign, described as focusing on "a squad of characters as they face increasingly challenging chapters, from the invasion of Iraq in 2003 through the insurrection period and leading to the present day."[13] A trailer for the campaign was shown at E3 2017. The campaign was later canceled in January 2018, with lead designer Michael Tsarouhas explaining in an announcement that it was canceled due to "high production requirements and our commitment to deliver to our fans in 2018", noting that the initial plan to set the game in an actual world conflict was restricting and "admittedly, sensitive", and that the conflict depicted in-game was fictionalized, but drew inspiration from real conflicts. The announcement also stated that the campaign would be "considered again at a later date".[1][15]

Release[edit]

Insurgency: Sandstorm was released for Windows on December 12, 2018, through Steam. Linux and macOS releases were planned, but they were both cancelled in December 2019.[2] While PlayStation 4 and Xbox One releases of Sandstorm were announced, they have gone through various delays.[3][4] They were initially planned to be released around the same time as the Windows release, but their release was repeatedly delayed due to development issues. Since the initial release of Sandstorm on Windows, the console releases of the game have been delayed to 2019,[16] early 2020, and August 2020.[17] The PlayStation 4 and Xbox One releases, as well as the PlayStation 5 and Xbox Series X/S releases, were released on September 29, 2021.[18][19][20]

Since its release, the game has had several updates adding new maps, game modes, cosmetic items, weapons, and equipment, including returning content from Insurgency and Day of Infamy. Since the release of update 1.7 "Operation: Nightfall" in June 2020, major content updates have been called "Operations", similar to Tom Clancy's Rainbow Six Siege. "Operation: Nightfall" also included paid cosmetic items and weapon skins as downloadable content, a first for the Insurgency series. Update 1.9, "Operation: Cold Blood", was developed from home during the COVID-19 pandemic and was released in December 2020. The game is currently on update 1.10, "Operation: Exodus", released May 18, 2021.

Reception[edit]

Reception

Insurgency: Sandstorm received acclaim from critics for its realistic gameplay and atmospheric sound design. VG247 rated Sandstorm as "one of the best multiplayer games of the year".[26]Sandstorm received an 88/100 from IGN, writing "[it] nails the balance between realism and fun", though it criticized unclear map boundaries.[27]PCGamer rated the game 85/100, calling it "terrifying", and further expressing "I’ll never forget the screaming".[28] It received "generally favorable" reviews according to review aggregator Metacritic.[29]

Sandstorm's optimization received some criticism, with Worth Playing writing "In the heat of an intense battle, your processor will also put out some heat."[30] A more critical review came from PCGamesN, who felt the game was "behind the times in both theme and looks" with "nameless locations with nameless conflicts", lamenting the removal of the planned story campaign, which would have featured "two Iraqi women crossing a war-torn land"—"It’s a shame to miss out on a potentially refreshing perspective."[31]

Controversies[edit]

Update 1.9, "Operation: Cold Blood", included a major overhaul of the co-op mode weapon availability which, prior to the change, allowed each faction to use the opposing faction's weapons; the update undid this, standardizing the weapon loadouts with the Versus modes. The community response to this change was very negative, leading New World Interactive to undo the change and release an apology on Steam.[32]

Update 1.9.1, the "Lunar New Year Update", included two Chinese rifles (QBZ-97 and QTS-11), but was also meant to include two Chinese-themed DLC cosmetics for Security and Insurgents, the latter being a bright red changshan. The planned cosmetics were harshly criticized by the community, as they were deemed to be too unrealistic and clashed with the established artstyle, with many negatively comparing their appearances to character skins in Fortnite. Following the backlash, New World Interactive stated they would not release the cosmetics;[33][34] update 1.9.1 released on February 2, 2021 without them.[35]

References[edit]

  1. ^ ab"Insurgency: Sandstorm Community Update - A Shift in Direction". Focus Home Interactive - Official Forums. 2018-01-03. Retrieved 2019-10-13.
  2. ^ ab"Steam :: Insurgency: Sandstorm :: State of Production 4". steamcommunity.com. 2019-12-09. Retrieved 2019-12-10.
  3. ^ ab"Announcing Insurgency: Sandstorm". New World Interactive. Retrieved 23 August 2018.
  4. ^ ab"Insurgency Sandstorm Console Release Delayed Once More". PlayStation LifeStyle. 2020-06-19. Retrieved 2020-06-21.
  5. ^Insurgency: Sandstorm - Console Release Date Reveal Trailer, retrieved 2021-08-26
  6. ^"Review: Insurgency: Sandstorm balances realism with mainstream shooter gameplay". Gamecrate. Retrieved 2019-10-13.
  7. ^"Insurgency: Sandstorm". Insurgency: Sandstorm. Retrieved 2018-09-12.
  8. ^"Insurgency: Sandstorm - BRRRRRRRRTTT - YouTube". www.youtube.com. Retrieved 2021-01-07.
  9. ^"Insurgency: Sandstorm - Helicopter Takedown - YouTube". www.youtube.com. Retrieved 2021-01-07.
  10. ^ ab"Insurgency: Sandstorm update for September 10, 2019 - Update 1.4 Now Live". SteamDB. September 10, 2019. Retrieved February 12, 2020.
  11. ^"Insurgency: Sandstorm update for December 6, 2019 - Update 1.5 Now Live". SteamDB. December 6, 2019. Retrieved February 12, 2020.
  12. ^"Insurgency: Sandstorm update for October 4, 2019 - Patch 1.4.1 Now Live". SteamDB. October 4, 2019. Retrieved February 12, 2020.
  13. ^ ab"Announcing Insurgency: Sandstorm | New World Interactive". Retrieved 2021-01-06.
  14. ^Wright, Steven T. (2018-06-14). "'Insurgency: Sandstorm' Hunts for Balance Between Realism and Arcade Shooter". Variety. Retrieved 2019-10-13.
  15. ^Wales, Matt (2018-01-03). "Insurgency: Sandstorm has dropped its planned story mode". Eurogamer. Retrieved 2021-01-06.
  16. ^"Insurgency Sandstorm PS4 and Xbox One Versions Delayed". PlayStation LifeStyle. 2018-06-03. Retrieved 2021-01-06.
  17. ^"Insurgency Sandstorm Console Release Date Confirmed for August 2020". PlayStation LifeStyle. 2020-02-26. Retrieved 2021-01-06.
  18. ^"EMBRACER GROUP ACQUIRES NEW WORLD INTERACTIVE". Embracer Group. August 13, 2020. Retrieved September 17, 2020.
  19. ^"NEW WORLD INTERACTIVE JOINS THE EMBRACER GROUP AS PART OF SABER INTERACTIVE". New World Interactive. August 14, 2020. Retrieved September 17, 2020.
  20. ^"Insurgency Sandstorm Console Release Date Now Slated for 2021". PlayStation LifeStyle. 2020-08-13. Retrieved 2021-01-06.
  21. ^"Insurgency: Sandstorm". Metacritic. Retrieved 2019-07-07.
  22. ^Insurgency: Sandstorm Review - IGN, retrieved 2019-07-07
  23. ^Iwaniuk, Phil (2018-12-18). "Insurgency: Sandstorm review". PC Gamer. Retrieved 2019-07-07.
  24. ^Bertz, Matt. "Insurgency: Sandstorm Review – What's Old Is New Again". Game Informer. Retrieved 2019-07-07.
  25. ^L'avis de (2019-01-18). "Test Insurgency : Sandstorm - Un FPS exigeant à l'immersion impressionnante". Jeuxvideo.com. Retrieved 2021-05-30.
  26. ^"Insurgency Sandstorm review - ear-splitting FPS is one of the best multiplayer games of the year". VG247. 2018-12-12. Retrieved 2019-10-13.
  27. ^Insurgency: Sandstorm Review - IGN, retrieved 2019-10-13
  28. ^Iwaniuk, Phil (2018-12-18). "Insurgency: Sandstorm review". PC Gamer. Retrieved 2021-04-01.
  29. ^"Insurgency: Sandstorm". Metacritic. Retrieved 2019-10-13.
  30. ^"PC Review - 'Insurgency: Sandstorm'". WorthPlaying. Retrieved 2019-10-13.
  31. ^"Insurgency: Sandstorm review – the definitive edition of an ageing war". PCGamesN. Retrieved 2019-10-13.
  32. ^"Steam :: Insurgency: Sandstorm :: Update On 1.9 Weapon Changes". store.steampowered.com. 2020-12-13. Retrieved 2021-01-06.
  33. ^"Insurgency: Sandstorm - January 2021 Community Update Blog - Steam News". store.steampowered.com. 2021-01-29. Retrieved 2021-04-01.
  34. ^@InsurgencyGame. "To our fans, Over the past seven days we've received a lot of feedback on the 1.9.1 Character and Weapon Skin DLCs and have decided we will not be releasing them. Thank you for your feedback, we will continue to listen. (1/2)". Twitter. Retrieved 2021-04-01.
  35. ^"Insurgency: Sandstorm - Update 1.9.1 Now Live! - Steam News". store.steampowered.com. 2021-02-02. Retrieved 2021-04-01.
Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Insurgency:_Sandstorm
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NEWS

Sandstorm Release Date

The release date is online on the Sandstorm website at http://insurgency-sandstorm.com/

The beta is already accessible for people who pre-order the game. For more information, see the Insurgency: Sandstorm article. For the contents of the game, see p…


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New Insurgency: Sandstorm Info

Two videos from E3 give us a whole lot of new information on Insurgency: Sandstorm. Many pages are already updated, including the Classes of Insurgency: Sandstorm article. We also got eyes on which weapons will be in the game.

Now it should be noted …


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Insurgency: Sandstorm Release Date

NWI announced a release date estimation for Insurgency: Sandstorm:

September 2018 for PC

Q1 2019 for console

The price has also been set:

$ 29

Players who bought Insurgency will get a 10% discount. Pre-ordering the game also gives an additional 10% off.

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The Insurgency series is the intellectual property of New World Interactive. This site is not endorsed by or affiliated with New World Interactive, or its licensors. All trademarks are the property of their respective owners. Game content and materials are:
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Insurgency (video game)

Online tactical shooter video game by New World Interactive

For the form of armed rebellion against the state, see Insurgency.

2014 video game

Insurgency is a multiplayer tactical first-person shootervideo game developed and published by New World Interactive.[1] It is a standalone sequel to Insurgency: Modern Infantry Combat, a community made mod for Valve's Source engine.[2] The game was released for Microsoft Windows, OS X, and Linux on January 22, 2014.

The game received mixed to positive reviews from game critics, who compared it to Counter-Strike: Global Offensive, but was acclaimed by players for its realism, harsh difficulty, mod support, sound design, animations, levels and gameplay, and was equally praised for its optimization.[citation needed] The game's success spawned a spinoff, Day of Infamy, and a sequel, Insurgency: Sandstorm.

Gameplay[edit]

One of Insurgency's defining characteristics is its hardcore gameplay.[3][4] Unlike other first-person shooters, Insurgency has a very simple HUD, and lacks virtual crosshairs, ammunition and player health counters and minimaps.[1][3] Guns are accurate and extremely deadly. Most game modes in do not feature instant respawns. Instead, on death, players must spectate and wait for their team to complete an objective in order to respawn.

At the beginning of each game, players are able to choose a class and select a variety of weapons. Players have a certain number of supply points to spend on purchasing weapons and modifications.[4]

Game modes[edit]

Versus[edit]

  • Push: The attacking team must capture three territorial objectives in sequential order. For every objective captured, more reinforcements are made available and more time is given to capture the next objective. The defenders must protect the objectives from the attackers. If the attackers are able to capture all three objectives, they must find and destroy the cache. At this point, the defenders only have one life to fend off the attackers. The game ends when either team runs out of reinforcements and players or time.
  • Firefight: Both teams must battle each other to capture all three territorial objectives. Each player only has one life and can only respawn after their team has captured an objective. A team wins when either the entire other team is eliminated, or all three objectives are captured.
  • Skirmish: Like Firefight, there are three territorial objectives that both teams have to capture. Each team also as a cache to protect. If the caches of both teams are destroyed, the game will be played like Firefight. To win, the cache must be destroyed and all three objectives captured.
  • Occupy: Each team has a certain number of reinforcement waves. There is one central territorial objective that the teams have to the capture. The team that is in possession of the objective will be given infinite reinforcement waves. The game is won when the other team has run out of reinforcement waves, and do not have any players remaining.
  • Ambush: One team has a VIP that they must escort to an end location, whilst the other team must stop the convoy from reaching their end destination. The game ends when the VIP reaches his or her destination, or when the VIP is killed.
  • Strike: The attacking team must destroy the three caches of the defending team. For every cache the attacking team destroys, time and additional reinforcements are rewarded. The game ends when the attacking team runs out of reinforcements and players, or when all three caches are destroyed.
  • Infiltrate: Each team must capture and return the enemy's intel back to their base. Reinforcements are only rewarded when the enemy intel is captured, or when the enemy with the intel belonging to the player's team is eliminated. (This game mode has since been discontinued)
  • Flashpoint: Each team receives two caches with one neutral territorial objective. The game ends when the opposing team's caches are destroyed, and the entire territory is captured. (This game mode has since been discontinued)
  • Elimination: The attacking team must destroy one of two caches belonging to the defending team. Each player only has one life. The game ends when one of the caches is destroyed, or when the entire attacking team is eliminated.

Co-op[edit]

  • Checkpoint: Players are grouped into one team and must complete mission-based objectives against AI. Every completed objective will grant fallen players another life.
  • Hunt: Players are grouped into one team and must eliminate the entire group of AI insurgents. Each player only has one life. The game ends when all insurgents are killed and the weapons cache is destroyed.
  • Survival: Players play as insurgents who must take on increasingly difficult waves of security forces. Each successful wave grants players extra supply points to purchase stronger weapons and modifications. Any dead players will also be revived at the end of each wave.
  • Outpost: Players are grouped into one team and must protect their weapons cache from opposing forces. Every wave that is successfully defended will grant the players reinforcements.
  • Conquer: Players must capture objectives and defend them from opposing forces. Destroying opposing caches will reduce the amount of opposing forces.[1]

Development[edit]

Inspired by the reception of the Insurgency: Modern Infantry Combat mod for Half-Life 2, a dedicated sequel was put into development.[5] In July 2012, a kickstarter was launched for Insurgency, with a goal of $180,000.[6] The kickstarter later failed with only 37% of the monetary goal raised.[5] After multiple obstacles to work through, such as constantly running out of funds,[7] the game was finally launched into Steam's early access in March 2013.[8] During the ten months in early access, the developers of Insurgency were able to get feedback from the community, and thoroughly updated the game. The game was officially released on January 22, 2014.[8]

Reception[edit]

Insurgency was met with overall good reviews. Metacritic, which grades on a 100-point scale, gave Insurgency a 74.[9]IGN rated it a 7.5 out of 10,[4] Hooked Gamers rated it a 9 out of 10,[10] and PC Gamer rated it a 77.[3]

Sales[edit]

As of July 2017, there are approximately 3.76 million owners of Insurgency on Steam.[11] According to Andrew Spearin, the creative director of New World Interactive, about 400,000 copies were sold in the first eight months on Steam.[12]

Sequel[edit]

Main article: Insurgency: Sandstorm

In February 2016, New World Interactive announced a sequel, Insurgency: Sandstorm.[13] The game is available for Microsoft Windows, and will release in 2021 for the PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PlayStation 5, and Xbox Series X/S.[14]Insurgency: Sandstorm is published by Focus Home Interactive and uses Unreal Engine 4.[13] Originally planned to be released in 2017,[13] the Microsoft Windows version of the game was released on December 12, 2018, on Steam to critical acclaim from game critics and players alike.

References[edit]

  1. ^ abc"Insurgency on Steam". store.steampowered.com. Retrieved June 17, 2016.
  2. ^"New World Interactive". newworldinteractive.com. Retrieved June 17, 2016.
  3. ^ abc"Insurgency review". pcgamer. Retrieved June 20, 2016.
  4. ^ abcPearson, Craig (January 28, 2014). "INSURGENCY REVIEW". Insurgency Review. IGN.
  5. ^ abSarkar, Samit (June 1, 2013). "From mod to game: Insurgency devs turn pro, but maintain community origins". Polygon. Retrieved June 21, 2016.
  6. ^Gera, Emily (July 11, 2012). "'Insurgency: Modern Infantry Combat' sequel comes to Kickstarter". Polygon. Retrieved June 21, 2016.
  7. ^"The Future of Insurgency.. Begins Now | New World Interactive". newworldinteractive.com. Retrieved June 21, 2016.
  8. ^ abFarokhmanesh, Megan (January 14, 2014). "Steam Early Access shooter Insurgency launches in full Jan. 22". Polygon. Retrieved June 21, 2016.
  9. ^"Insurgency". Metacritic. Retrieved June 17, 2016.
  10. ^"Insurgency PC review - "A breath of fresh air" | Hooked Gamers". www.hookedgamers.com. Retrieved June 20, 2016.
  11. ^"Insurgency -". SteamSpy - All the data about Steam games. Retrieved July 10, 2017.
  12. ^Spearin, Andrew (September 23, 2014). "First 24hrs: Results from Steam's update". Medium. Retrieved June 20, 2016.
  13. ^ abc"Announcing Insurgency: Sandstorm". New World Interactive. February 23, 2016. Retrieved August 15, 2018.
  14. ^"Insurgency Sandstorm Console Release Date Now Slated for 2021". PlayStation LifeStyle. August 13, 2020. Retrieved January 6, 2021.

External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Insurgency_(video_game)


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