Stanford 2020 commencement

Stanford 2020 commencement DEFAULT

2020 Commencement update from President Tessier-Lavigne

August 16, 2021

Dear Stanford 2020 graduates,

Since your Stanford graduation was a virtual celebration, we have remained committed to finding a time to celebrate together, in person, on campus. So I am excited to let you know that we have set a date to do that: Saturday, June 11, 2022.

You completed your Stanford education in unusual times. Now we will celebrate your accomplishments with a traditional ceremony, surrounded by family and friends in Stanford Stadium, with all the elements that make Commencement Weekend on the Farm special.

The stadium ceremony, Baccalaureate and Senior Dinner on the Quad will be focused on 2020 graduates. These will be separate from the Commencement ceremony on June 12 and other corresponding events for 2022 graduates. Additional gatherings during the weekend, some of them conducted jointly, will enable you to spend time with others from the departments, schools and programs that helped shape your Stanford journey.

We are continuing to work out other aspects of the weekend. These include lodging options, speakers and financial aid for those with need. Stay tuned for updates via email and on the Commencement 2020 website, where you can also find FAQs with more details.

You’ve waited a long time for this ceremony and we want to make it special. Your suggestions have been very useful in our planning and, to further help, please let us know if you are likely to attend by filling out this short form.

Start making your plans for the weekend of June 10-12 and, as you pursue new adventures in the meantime, your Stanford alumni family can help you stay connected.

In the 14 months since we first saluted your accomplishments and encouraged you to keep dreaming big, I hope that you have been finding success and drawing on your Stanford friends and mentors.

Nothing can fully make up for the disruptions caused by the pandemic, but we’re excited to host a memorable, meaningful weekend for you and your classmates. We are honored to have the chance to recognize your achievements once again, this time in person!

Sincerely,

Marc Tessier-Lavigne

Sours: https://commencement.stanford.edu/2020-commencement-update-president-tessier-lavigne

Stanford holds Bay Area's first full in-person college commencement since pandemic began

“It means all the world to me. To say I am happy is an understatement,” said Kingston, who had flown in from Park City, Utah, and was dressed in more dignified fashion than her son, in a Cardinal red cocktail dress.

“Human beings need to have social interactions,” she said. “I see these other parents and I just want to celebrate with them.”

Stanford, which traditionally holds the last graduation ceremony of the season among Bay Area colleges and universities, was the first this year. Also, it was the only one to hold a fully live graduation ceremony with all the graduates seated in one place at one time.

Because of the pandemic, in 2020 all graduations in the region were virtual, including Stanford’s. This year some remained virtual, including San Francisco State University’s and the University of San Francisco’s. Some were a hybrid, notably San Jose State University’s and UC Berkeley’s, which held a virtual commencement ceremony May 15, followed by four days of diploma distribution at the Greek Theatre. Out of 15,000 graduates, 6,000 signed up to put on their caps, gowns and accouterments and cross the stage in groups of 30 every 10 minutes. It took 28 hours spread across four days to accommodate everyone.

UC Santa Cruz held a virtual commencement that went live at noon Friday. In addition, a weekend “Slug Crossing” — so named because of the university’s banana slug mascot — allowed grads to cross a stage and collect their diplomas. Each of the 3,500 graduating Slugs who participated was allowed to bring two guests, provided they all arrived in the same car.

Saint Mary’s held a three-day “Carmencement” in Moraga and Mills College in Oakland was fully virtual.

The closest in scope to Stanford’s commencement was at Santa Clara University. On Friday, 1,228 of its 1,468 matriculating undergraduates put on robes, mortarboards and face masks for a 1-mile campus walk to collect their diplomas. The actual commencement was held virtually on Saturday.

It was the 130th commencement ceremony at Stanford, and it took some compromises to get it done. The graduate and undergraduate programs, which normally walk en masse at the stadium, were split into two ceremonies on Saturday. Departmental ceremonies, which normally happen across the campus after the main commencement, were virtual.

Graduates were spaced 6 feet apart and spread across 60 yards of the football field. They were restricted to two guests apiece, resulting in fewer than 3,000 people populating the 50,000-seat stadium.

Everybody, graduates and parents, had to show proof of vaccination and pass through a health screening station in the parking lot. But nobody was complaining.

“I cried tears of happiness when I heard the graduation was live, not virtual,” said Leen Dawany, who had flown in from Jensen Beach, Fla., to see her son Saris get his degree. “I’m more excited than he is. I just hope my son doesn’t wear some crazy costume.”

Like most everything else, the Wacky Walk — an irreverent, costumed stroll that precedes the commencement walk — was subdued this year. The getups were understated. Eight staffers on the Stanford Daily wore cardboard custom front pages with their heads sticking through above the fold. “We have a group of eight people,” explained Julia Gong, the cartoons editor, “and I feel like the costumes make the Daily staffers look cohesive just like we are.”

Family members always fly in from around the world for graduation. Among the many twists this year was that their graduating children flew in for graduation from the same places as their parents. Gong and her parents came from Cary, N.C.

“I have friends at Harvard and MIT, and they were all virtual so I’m grateful that we were able to fly out,” Gong said.

Most graduates had not been in the stadium since the 2019 football season, and they were excited to walk down the student ramp. Four friends were so excited that they got there at 6 a.m. to be at the front of the line. First came the color guard, then came the four seniors each dressed as a glass of beer, in a nod to a campus pub.

“Being able to celebrate together after being apart for so long is just incredible,” said Andre Turati, who flew in from Houston to put on his pint glass. His parents were good sports about it. “They laughed at first,” he said.

Everyone inside the stadium was required to wear masks, a constant reminder that the pandemic is still here. The speeches were also a reminder. University President Marc Tessier-Lavigne first touched on it by mentioning what a “hard year” it has been. Then keynote speaker Issa Rae, a graduate in 2007 and now an actor, writer and producer, drove the point home.

“I can’t imagine having the strength to finish my degree while the the world is falling apart all around you,” she said. “But it looks like you did.”

Sam Whiting is a San Francisco Chronicle staff writer. Email: [email protected] Twitter:@samwhitingsf

Sours: https://www.sfchronicle.com/local/article/Stanford-holds-Bay-Area-s-first-full-in-person-16244987.php
  1. New hartford sushi
  2. Electronic mini piano
  3. Play golf clash

It's time to celebrate 2020 graduates!

Join us for the 2020 Commencement Weekend
June 10 - 12, 2022

2020 Commencement Update from President Tessier-Lavigne

Dear Stanford 2020 graduates,

Since your Stanford graduation was a virtual celebration, we have remained committed to finding a time to celebrate together, in person, on campus. So I am excited to let you know that we have set a date to do that: Saturday, June 11, 2022.

You completed your Stanford education in unusual times. Now we will celebrate your accomplishments with a traditional ceremony, surrounded by family and friends in Stanford Stadium, with all the elements that make Commencement Weekend on the Farm special.

The stadium ceremony, Baccalaureate and Senior Dinner on the Quad will be focused on 2020 graduates. These will be separate from the Commencement ceremony on June 12 and other corresponding events for 2022 graduates. Additional gatherings during the weekend, some of them conducted jointly, will enable you to spend time with others from the departments, schools and programs that helped shape your Stanford journey.

Read the full letter

Friday, June 10, 2022

2020 Baccalaureate

Baccalaureate at Stanford is a multifaith celebratory gathering, which will be held for 2020 graduates and their guests on Friday, June 10 in Frost Amphitheater.

Saturday, June 11, 2022

2020 Commencement

We look forward to celebrating with our 2020 graduates and their guests for an in-person Commencement ceremony on the morning of Saturday, June 11 in Stanford Stadium.

School & Department Ceremonies

A complete listing of all school and department ceremonies occurring Commencement Weekend will be posted in spring quarter.

Friday, June 10, 2022

Senior Dinner on the Quad

The Stanford Alumni Association is planning complimentary traditional class graduation events for '20 undergraduate degree celebrants including Dinner on the Quad and time capsule activities. Please view information here and look for an email in the spring with more details.

Share your plans for attending

Let us know if you will be joining us for Commencement Weekend to help with our planning.

Complete the form

Frequently Asked Questions

Review the Frequently Asked Questions for additional Commencement Weekend details. These will be updated as we have new information to share with our graduates and their family members.

Read the FAQs

Sours: https://commencement.stanford.edu/weekend-info/2020-commencement-weekend
Stanford University Commencement 2019

Stanford to hold Class of 2020’s Commencement Ceremony on June 11, 2022

Stanford will hold an in-person Commencement Ceremony for Class of 2020 graduates on June 11, 2022, according to an email sent to graduates from Stanford President Marc Tessier-Lavigne.

The news comes as Stanford prepares to welcome students back to campus in the fall for in-person classes and operate under pre-pandemic procedures. The ceremony will be held two years after the Class of 2020 experienced an entirely virtual graduation due to the COVID-19 pandemic.  

The “traditional” ceremony will take place in Stanford Stadium, allowing for the family and friends of graduates to attend, according to Tessier-Lavigne. He added that during the Class of 2020’s Commencement Weekend, which will span from June 10 to 12, the stadium ceremony, Baccalaureate and Senior Dinner on the Quad will be focused on 2020 graduates.

Events held for 2020 graduates will be separate from the Class of 2022 Commencement Ceremony — which will take place on June 12 — and other graduation events being held for the new graduating class, Tessier-Lavigne wrote.

The University will also host gatherings for graduates to visit various departments, schools and programs that have helped shape their undergraduate years, according to the email. Several will be conducted jointly with both the Class of 2020 and 2022. 

The University is still working out other aspects of Commencement Weekend — including lodging options, featured speakers and financial aid options, Tessier-Lavigne added. However, he assured graduates that the event will have “all the elements that make Commencement Weekend on The Farm special.” Additional updates will be sent to the Class of 2020 and their families via email and on a dedicated Commencement 2020 website. 

Tessier-Lavigne encouraged students who are planning on attending to fill out an interest form to select which gatherings they hope to participate in.

“Nothing can fully make up for the disruptions caused by the pandemic, but we’re excited to host a memorable, meaningful weekend for you and your classmates,” he wrote. “We are honored to have the chance to recognize your achievements once again, this time in person!”

Sours: https://www.stanforddaily.com/2021/08/16/stanford-to-hold-class-of-2020s-commencement-ceremony/

Commencement stanford 2020

A correction to an earlier version of this article has been appended to the end of the article.

PALO ALTO — Stanford University’s 130th commencement on Sunday morning lacked some of the usual traditions, but few of the participants complained amid the celebratory proceedings that marked another sign of California’s imminent grand reopening.

The in-person ceremony at Stanford Stadium, which was not afforded the Class of 2020 last June, came just before the lifting of many of the state’s COVID-19 pandemic restrictions on Tuesday.

While the commencement heralded a return to life for the Golden State, simply being on campus after 15 months provided joy for some of the 1,436 students who were awarded bachelor’s degrees from the prestigious private university.

Devia Terry of Philadelphia said she felt excitement on her first trip back since March 2020, when Stanford leaders shut down the school because of the global pandemic.

“You step on Stanford’s campus and it looks beautiful, you feel beautiful, the people are beautiful; everything is like paradise,” said Terry, who earned a degree in urban studies.

After 1½ years of lockdowns and Zoom online classes, graduates had a collective appreciation for a ceremony among friends and family despite a handful of modifications to address coronavirus public health protocols.

One of the biggest changes was limiting students to two guests, leaving the 50,000-seat football stadium with plenty of room for social distancing. Few attendees were allowed to sit in the lower decks, so many of them unfolded umbrellas to block the searing sun.

Decrecia Limbrick, an assistant health director in Texas, felt grateful she could share the moment with her daughter, Madison Houston, although she said it was not “what a traditional graduation would look like.”

Houston earned a degree in human biology and plans to enter medical school next year, according to Limbrick.

“It’s a step forward,” Limbrick said of attending the commencement in person. “It gives me hope. Things may not always be what you want but you have to see the silver lining in everything.”

The commencement speakers highlighted the juncture the graduates have reached after enduring the kind of upheaval once reserved for science-fiction writings.

Keynote speaker Issa Rae, a 2007 Stanford graduate and actress, best-selling author and producer, emphasized leaning on fellow classmates even after leaving the sprawling campus behind. She said her Stanford connections helped forge a successful career after entertainment industry leaders told her that stories about the Black community would not sell.

Rae just completed shooting her fifth and final season of the Emmy-winning HBO comedy, “Insecure.”

Not all traditions slipped away on a sunny morning as the processional entered the stadium with their whimsical processional, known as the “Wacky Walk.”

The students wore themed costumes in small groups or clutched signs and banners that offered the kind of humor usually reserved for the Stanford Marching Band. Others wore animal masks; about a half dozen women lugged doughnut pool floats into the stadium.

A few made political statements in the aftermath of Black Lives Matter protests that swept the country a year ago. A pair of students held signs that read “Stanford still protects rapists” and “Unhouse White Supremacy,” part of a protest of a recent school decision to allow fraternities and sororities to remain on campus.

Stanford President Marc Tessier-Lavigne told the gathering that graduates were leaving Stanford during a time of historic change that gives them a chance to recalibrate their lives. He reminded the graduates to not turn away from the difficult times they have endured.

“You now have a rare opportunity to reassess what interests, relationships and pursuits give you meaning and fulfillment and design your life based on what you truly value,” he said.

Many of the graduates wanted to soak in their final moments at Stanford before considering the big picture.

Hari Sathyamurthy, a middle-distance runner for Stanford’s track and field team who earned a degree in product design, avoided losing out on the 2020 commencement by staying at the school for a fifth year.

“This is a sign of progress,” said Sathyamurthy, from Indianapolis. “Just being able to walk with my teammates and friends is a huge joy.”

Related Articles

Rower Sarah Ondak said their after-commencement plans were simple: pack up their dormitory room and drive with their father back to Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.

The family had been separated for nine months because Ondak was on campus since August to train. The Ondaks celebrated Thanksgiving and Christmas with Zoom video chats.

Sarah’s father, Stephen Ondak, said attending the milestone event after a long time away was “extra special.”

Sarah added: “At least we got this one.”


Correction: June 15, 2021  Due to an editor's error, an earlier version of this article mischaracterized the intent of protestors. They were protesting a recent school decision to allow fraternities and sororities to remain on campus.

Sours: https://www.mercurynews.com/2021/06/13/stanford-graduates-celebrate-modified-commencement-as-california-prepares-to-reopen
2021 Stanford Commencement address by Atul Gawande

Class of 2020 in-person commencement slated for early to mid-2022

Stanford will host an in-person commencement ceremony for the Class of 2020 during the spring or early summer of 2022, the University announced in a Monday email, citing improving conditions and loosening restrictions. 

“After more than a year of detours and unexpected opportunities, we’ll be excited to have you back — once again — at your starting point,” wrote the University to members of the Class of 2020. 

Stanford will set a date for the ceremony by Aug. 16, more than a year after the University’s 2020 graduates received a completely virtualcelebration. This announcement follows a successful in-person Class of 2021 commencement in Stanford Stadium in June.

Multiple factors influenced the decision during the planning process, including frosh and sophomores studying on campus this summer, an influx of students returning this fall, continued safety precautions and vigilance for an increase in campus density and uncertain weather conditions that “can vary greatly until the spring” of 2022. 

After a number of requests from the graduating community for a full-fledged celebration, the University wrote that graduation and related events — the Time Capsule and Senior Dinner on the Quad hosted by the Stanford Alumni Association — will “take place at a time of minimal or no restrictions,” allowing for family and friends to be present. 

“We intend to make that happen,” the University wrote, adding that members of the Stanford community can submit ideas and preferences for consideration. 

Recent graduates found hope in the news of an upcoming in-person graduation ceremony, though they did not forget the administration’s lack of clarity when the pandemic first struck in 2020. 

Clarissa Gutierrez ’20, a first-generation graduate, said she is grateful for this opportunity to “return to campus and share this beautiful milestone with my family.” 

Upon receiving the morning notification, she immediately forwarded the message to her mother, who replied, “‘Al final siempre sale el sol,’ which loosely translates to ‘in the end, the sun always rises,’” Gutierrez wrote to The Daily. 

Gutierrez hopes that the Stanford administration will provide adequate and accessible resources for all those attending, especially first-generation/low income students and their families. 

“Integral graduation traditions,” such as Wacky Walk, are what Aparna Verma ’20 looks forward to.  However, recounting how the pandemic ruined her class’s senior experience, Verma wished the Stanford administration was “more empathic” to its students during the onset of rapid change. 

“Instead of creating events or sending swag or a letter of concern, Stanford gave us a rushed 20 minute virtual ceremony,” Verma wrote to The Daily.

The administration’s lack of transparency and surface optimism misled the Class of 2020 into believing something substantial would occur when, in reality, nothing ended up panning out, according to Noelle Chow ’20. 

“It felt a bit like a captain trying to tell us that the boat wasn’t sinking because they believed they could fix it,” Chow said. “But then the boat did end up sinking.” 

When the email announcement first appeared on her phone Monday, Chow prepared herself to read that Stanford — in an attempt to soften the blow — would host additional virtual or localized ceremonies since people are living around the world. 

Chow isn’t alone. Andrew Garcia ’20 also said that he initially felt apprehension prior to opening the email. 

“I didn’t want to read another ‘non-answer’ as to when we were going to have our graduation ceremony,” he said.

However, upon reading the confident update, Chow was “floored.” After sitting on her living room couch during virtual graduation week, she feels that this will be an opportunity to reunite with her close friends and reconnect with her peers.

“Seeing that email honestly brought back all of those emotions” of her final days on campus before the onset of the pandemic, Chow said. “Right now, I am in overdrive thinking about how wonderful it will be to see my class.” 

Perhaps even more meaningful is the fact that parents and loved ones of the featured graduates will have the opportunity to attend, Chow said. “I’m so excited for my mom, for her to have her roses, for her to go to that ceremony.” 

Similar to Gutierrez, Chow shared the announcement with her mom, who said, “Oh my god, we are going to have our moment! We are not just going to have a piece of paper, we are going to get a picture of Noelle on stage with her diploma and name being said.” 

“That moment will be super, super special,” Chow said. “My people will get to have a ceremony and be celebrated too.” 

Sours: https://www.stanforddaily.com/2021/07/13/class-of-2020-in-person-commencement-slated-for-early-to-mid-2022/

Now discussing:

Was a little weight in it, and I did not suffer much, twirled a little, as if trying on, shamelessly pulled her short skirt and sat down again. The music began to play louder and my sister began to hammer at me with her heels, lifting and lowering her legs. With force on my face. She seemed to be trying new entertainment for herself and listening to her feelings.

Girls, you can dance on slaves, and if you stagger, let your friends hold your hands.



1169 1170 1171 1172 1173