Military rifle crates

Military rifle crates DEFAULT

List of U.S. Army munitions by supply catalog designation

The Ammunition Identification Code (AIC) was a sub-set of the Standard Nomenclature List (SNL). The SNL was an inventory system used from 1930 to 1958 to catalog all the items the Army's Ordnance Corps issued.

The AIC was used by the US Army's Ordnance Corps from January, 1942 to 1958. It listed munitions and explosives (items from SNLs P, R, S, and T), items that were considered priority issue for soldiers in combat. The markings used by the system made it easier for soldiers to quickly identify and procure the right items.

It used a code that had five parts.

  1. The first character consisted of the item's SNL Group and was represented by its letter.
  2. The second character indicated the sub-group and was represented by its number.
  3. The third character represented the weapon or weapons that could use it and was represented by a letter.
  4. The fourth character represented the type and model of ammunition (i.e., Training Blank, Ball, Armor-Piercing, Incendiary, Tracer, etc.), which differed from weapon to weapon, and was represented by a letter.
  5. The fifth and last character detailed the packing method (Cartons, Bandoleers, or Belts / Links) and container type used (M1917 Rifle Ammunition Packing Box, M23 Ammo Crate, etc.) and was designated by a letter.

The AIC was replaced by the FSN (Federal Stock Number) in 1958, which later became the NSN (National Stock Number) in 1975.

Contents

  • 1Packing Terminology
  • 2Group "P" Material (Ammunition for Heavy Field Artillery and Anti-Aircraft Weapons)
  • 3Group "R" Material (Ammunition for pack, light, and medium field artillery)
    • 3.1Sub-Group R1 (Ammunition, fixed and semi-fixed, all types – including subcaliber – for pack, light, and medium field artillery, including complete round data)
    • 3.2Sub-Group R2 (Projectiles and separate-loading propelling charges for medium field artillery, including complete round data)
    • 3.3Sub-Group R3 (Service fuzes and primers for pack, light, and medium field artillery)
    • 3.4Sub-Group R4 (Ammunition for trench mortars; including fuzes, propelling charges and other components)
    • 3.5Sub-Group R5 (Ammunition, blank, for Pack, Light, and Medium field artillery)
    • 3.6Sub-Group R6 (Ammunition instruction material for pack, light, and medium field artillery)
    • 3.7Sub-Group R7 (Land Mines and Fuzes, Demolition Material, and Ammunition for Simulated Artillery and Grenade Fire)
    • 3.8Sub-Group R8 (Ammunition, complete, nonstandard)
    • 3.9Sub-Group R9 (?)
    • 3.10Sub-Group R10 (Packing materials used by field service)
  • 4Group "S" Material (Bombs, grenades, pyrotechnics)
    • 4.1Sub-Group S1 (Bombs, aircraft, all types)
    • 4.2Sub-Group S2 (Fuzes and miscellaneous explosive components for aircraft bombs)
    • 4.3Sub-Group S3 (Fin assemblies, and miscellaneous inert components for aircraft bombs)
    • 4.4Sub-Group S4 (Grenades, hand and rifle, and fuzing components)
    • 4.5Sub-Group S5 (Pyrotechnics, military, all types)
      • 4.5.1Class S5P (Signal, Illumination, Aircraft, for Pyrotechnic Pistol AN-M8)
      • 4.5.2Class S5R (Signal, Illumination, Ground, for Grenade Launchers M1, M2, M7, & M8)
    • 4.6Sub-Group S6 (Ammunition instruction material for grenades, pyrotechnics, and aircraft bombs)
    • 4.7Sub-Group S7 (Guided missile complete rounds, all types)
    • 4.8Sub-Group S8 (Guided missile explosive components, all types)
    • 4.9Sub-Group S9 (Rockets, all types)
    • 4.10Sub-Group S10 (Obsolete and nonstandard bombs, grenades, pyrotechnics, and rockets)
    • 4.11Sub-Group S11 (Materials for renovating and packaging of Group "S" ammunition and miscellaneous items)
  • 5Group "T" Material (Small Arms Ammunition)
  • 6See also
  • 7References

Packing Terminology[edit]

Cartons[edit]

Ammunition came packed in single-ply chipboard cartons lined with Manila paper. A label marked with the number of cartridges, caliber and type of ammo, manufacturer, and Lot Code was glued over the top flap, front, and back to seal the carton. Wartime boxes (1942 to 1945) had wide vertical colored stripes, like those used on the packing box, as a background for the text. This allowed the soldier to quickly visually identify the ammo he needed.

.45 ACP[edit]

.45 ACP ammo for the Colt M1911 semi-automatic pistol and Thompson submachine gun originally came in 20-round boxes. It was later changed to 50-round boxes in 1942 for ease of packing and distribution. They were packed in the small M1917 Pistol Ammunition Packing Boxes.

.45 ACP ammo for the Colt M1917 and Smith & Wesson M1917 revolvers came packed in 3-round Half-Moon clips. They were packed eight clips per carton in two-row (2x12 cell – sideways interlocking "zig-zag" style) or three-row (3x9 cell – inline overlapping "spoons" style) rectangular cartons of 24 rounds. They were packed in the larger M1917 Rifle / Machinegun Ammunition Packing Boxes.

.30 Carbine[edit]

M1 Carbine ammo was originally packed in 3-row 45-round boxes to reduce waste, as the carbine had a 15-round magazine. This was later changed in 1942 to 50-round boxes to ship as much ammo as possible. They were packed in a special small wooden crate, perhaps so a soldier wouldn't grab the wrong ammunition.

.30 Caliber[edit]

.30-caliber rifle (Grade "R") and machine gun (Grade "MG") ammo came in 20-round boxes. Early-war cartons for use in bolt-action rifles like the Springfield M1903 came with the ammo already in 5-round stripper clips.

.50 Caliber[edit]

.50-caliber machine gun ammo (Grades "AC" and "MG") came bulk-packed in 10-round boxes for loading into belts or links in-theater.

M1917 Ammunition Packing Box[edit]

A wooden box designed to be reused. The lid was secured by tightening brass wingnuts over threaded metal posts in the walls of the chest. They were meant to be carried by means of handles milled into the ends of the chest; troops assigned to carry ammo found them hard to grasp.[1] Ammunition was shipped in boxes with a waterproof zinc metal lining that had the top soldered on to seal it; this was ripped open using a wire handle built into the top. It came in two standard sizes.

There was a large packing box (Dimensions: 18-7/16" Length × 9-7/16" Width × 14-13/16" Height; Tare Weight: 9 lbs. Volume: 1.49 cubic feet) secured with 6 threaded posts (one on each end and two on each side). It was used to store and carry .30- and .50-caliber ammunition.

The smaller box (Dimensions: 16-7/16" Length × 12-11/16" Width × 7-5/8" Height; Volume: 0.92 cubic feet) was secured with 4 threaded posts (one on each side). It was used for pistol and submachine gun ammunition. Another box (Volume: 0.83 cubic feet) was used for carbine ammunition.

Pre-war and early-war chests were made of brown stained or painted wood with yellow lettering. In 1943, a system of colored stripes across the middle of the long sides and lid to indicate the contents. Pistol, rifle and medium machine gun ammunition had the stripes painted vertically on the long sides and lid and horizontally on the wide sides. Heavy machine gun ammunition had the stripes painted diagonally on the long and wide sides and the lid.

Mid- to late-war chests were unstained with black painted lettering. They used the box's AIC code and a system of symbols to indicate the contents at a glance.

Packing Box Stripes[edit]

A straight stripe indicated Pistol, Carbine, Rifle and Medium Machine gun ammunition; it was vertical on the long sides and top and horizontal on the ends. Triple straight stripes were painted horizontally with the first stripe on top and the third stripe on the bottom. A diagonal stripe (lower left corner to upper right corner) indicated Heavy Machine gun ammunition. Triple diagonal stripes were painted with the first stripe on the left-side and the third stripe on the right side. If packed in cartons, the colored stripe was duplicated on the carton's label.

Red = Ball.
Orange with wide Green stripe = Dim Tracer (1600 yards range) or Subdued Tracer (50 to 140 yards before ignition / 1,000 yards range).
Yellow with wide Red stripe = Incendiary.
Yellow with wide Red stripe inset with narrow Green stripe = Incendiary Tracer.
Yellow with wide Green stripe = Bright Tracer (3,000 yards range).
Yellow with wide Blue stripe = Armor-Piercing.
Yellow with wide Blue stripe inset with narrow Red stripe = Armor-Piercing Incendiary.
Yellow with wide Blue stripe inset with narrow Green stripe = Armor-Piercing Tracer.
Green = Dummy.
Blue = Blank.
Blue with wide White stripe = Rifle Grenade Blank.
Triple Red, Yellow, and Green Stripe = Linked Ball & Tracer.
Triple Yellow, Red, and Green Stripe = Belted Ball & Tracer.
Triple Yellow, Blue, and Red Stripe = Belted Armor-Piercing & Incendiary.
Triple Yellow, Blue, and Green Stripe = Belted Armor-Piercing & Tracer.
Triple Blue, Yellow, and Red Stripe = Linked Armor-Piercing & Incendiary.
Triple Blue, Yellow, and Green Stripe = Linked Armor-Piercing & Tracer.

Commercial Shotgun Shell Packing Box[edit]

A wooden or fiberboard box with a waterproof tarpaper lining designed to transport and carry shotgun shells. It held 20 × 25-shell cartons (500 total shells) of 12 gauge ammunition and weighed around 65 lbs (Dimensions: 15" Length × 10.375" Width × 9.75" Height; Volume: 0.88 Cubic Feet). Guard shells had either a brass base (base only) with a full paper hull or partial brass case (1" long) and a long paper hull. Combat shells had either a partial brass case (1" long) with a long paper hull or a full (2.75" long) brass case and no paper hull. Sporting shells (used for trap shooting or hunting) either had a brass base with a full paper hull or a partial brass case (1/2" long) and a long paper hull.

Ammunition Crate[edit]

A metal-strapped wooden packing crate designed to be thrown away that replaced the M1917 Packing Box. They were made of plain, unpainted wood and had its lettering, AIC code, and symbols stamped on in black ink. They were carried by a horizontal rectangular wooden bar fastened to the pair of vertical wooden reinforcing struts on each end. Some crate contractors looped a semi-circular piece of thick rope through a hole in each reinforcing strut for use as a flexible handle. Other contractors used a folding two-strut metal handle fastened between the reinforcing struts for heavier loads.

The cartons of ammunition inside were originally grouped and packed in corrugated cardboard boxes. The boxes were then coated and sealed in a waterproof wax coating to keep the ammunition inside from being affected by the environment. There were 2 boxes per crate and they were loaded in the crate sideways so the bullets would fly off to the sides rather than through the top or bottom. The weatherproofing was found to be ineffective, so the cardboard boxes were replaced by ammunition cans in the autumn of 1943.

Ammunition Can[edit]

A vacuum-sealed metal canister with wire handles on its sides. They were first produced at the Evansville, Indiana Chrysler-Sunbeam plant in 1943 to pack .45 ACP ammunition in M5 cans. It was opened using a metal can key (like a can of sardines) that was soldered to the top. It could be reclosed afterwards using a small roll of duct tape that came packed in the can. They were painted Olive Drab and had yellow lettering on them. The caliber of ammunition – .45, .30C (Carbine – cartons), .30R (Rifle – clips or cartons), .30M (Machine gun – belted or linked ammo), or .50 – was embossed in raised letters and numbers on the metal lid so they could be identified by touch under low-light conditions.

The model of can (M5, M6, M8, M10, M13, etc.) was embossed on the bottom. The M5 cans were for packing .45 ACP ammo and weighed about 29 lbs. The M6 cans were for packing .30 Carbine ammo and weighed about 25 lbs. The M8 cans were for packing .30 Rifle & Machine gun ammo and weighed about 16 lbs. The M10 cans were originally for packing .50 Machine gun ammo but later on were also used to pack shotgun shells or a variety of other ammunition in cartons. The M13 can was for issue with a rifle grenade launcher and packed an assortment of six .30 Carbine M6 rifle-grenade blanks, ten .30-'06 Springfield rifle-grenade blanks, and a packet of five booster charges.

The instruction "Do Not Use As Food Container" was prominently painted on the can. The lead and chemical residue inside the container could contaminate the food and poison the soldier.

The Korean War–era universal M20 and M21 cans replaced the earlier assortment of cartridge-specific cans. The M20 was a rounded-edged cube with a folding handle on top. The M21, twice the height of the M20, was a taller version of the M20. They lacked the embossing of the earlier cans.

Repacked Ammo Cans[edit]

Old or damaged lots of ammunition were inspected, salvaged, sorted and repacked for re-use. Repacked ammunition was usually resealed in an unpainted ammo can with the information (including the last two digits of the year it was repacked) stamped on the container in black ink. The original manufacturer and lot code was retained and all salvaged rounds were usually from the same lot. If the new lot was salvaged from more than one lot, the arsenal that did the repacking would use their letter code in the place of the original manufacturer(s) along with a new lot code. The repacked crate would have a line of text beginning with "REPACKED LOT:" followed by the manufacturer or arsenal code and the lot number. In 1945 this text was replaced with "FUNCTIONAL LOT:", as troops had been leery of using "used" ammunition.

Standard Ammunition Box[edit]

A re-closeable metal box with a hinged metal lid sealed with a foam-rubber gasket to keep out moisture and rain and a folding metal handle to aid in carrying it. They were originally designed to only store belted machine gun ammunition, but later became a standard container after the war for all sorts of ammunition packed in cartons and / or clips and bandoleers. Originally planned to be disposable, they were recycled for reloading.

The ammo boxes were originally painted Olive Drab Brown (OD3) with white lettering, but were later painted Olive Drab Green (OD7) with yellow lettering. The early individual M1 and M2 series metal boxes were also painted with the same colored ammunition identification stripes as the pre-war and early-war M1917 wooden packing crates.

They were first shipped individually, but were later bulk-packed in unpainted wire-bound plywood crates with stencil-painted or ink-stamped lettering. The .30 M1 and M1A1 ammo boxes were packed four to a crate that weighed around 90 pounds and had a volume of 1 cubic foot. The M1 ammo crate held a total of 1,000 belted or linked rounds packed in 4 M1 ammo boxes and the later M1A1 ammo crate held a total of 1,000 belted or 1,100 linked rounds packed in M1A1 ammo boxes. There were two .50 M2 ammo boxes to a crate (for a total of 220 belted or 210 linked rounds) with a volume of 0.93 cubic feet. The later M2A1 can also came packed two to a crate (for a total of 200 linked rounds) with a volume of 0.85 cubic feet.

  • The M1 box (made from 1942 to 1945 and phased out by the 1950s) opened from the side, had a flat bottom, had a catch opposite from the box's hinge for attaching the can to the M1917 / M1917A1 / M1918 / M1928 tripod, and had a pair of concentric oval ribs on the long sides to reinforce them. Inside the rings was embossed two lines of text: "CAL .30M" / "AMMUNITION BOX"; with the "M" standing for Machine gun ammunition. The initials "U.S." and the US Army Ordnance Corps' "Flaming Bomb" symbol were embossed on the hinge side. It held 250 belted rounds of .30-caliber ammo and was designed to replace the similar but less durable M1917 wooden machine gun ammo boxes. (Dimensions: 10-3/16" Length × 3-3/4" Width × 7-7/32" Height; Weight (empty): around 3.5 lbs.; Net Weight (250-round M1 cloth belt): 15.5 lbs ; Gross Weight (loaded): 19 lbs. ; Volume: 0.1595 Cubic Feet).[2]
    The M1A1 Box that replaced it (June 1945 – 1950s and phased out in the early 1960s) was a little taller (11" Length × 3-13/16" Width × 7-19/32" Height), had a more durable rubber gasket, and held 250 belted or 275 linked rounds of .30-06 ammo. The M1A1 model can be distinguished from the earlier M1 by the different embossed text, which reads "CAL .30 M1" / "AMMUNITION BOX" in the oval; the "M" now stood for Model. Later cans were embossed with "CAL .30 M1A1" / "M.M.G. BOX". There were also some minor improvements. The tripod catch side was redesigned to be slightly angled at the bottom and top rather than flat to fit flush alongside the tripod mount.
  • The later M19 Box (1946 to 1953) that replaced the M1 series was a product-improved model that eliminated the earlier model's weaknesses and added improvements. It retained the rubber gasket, eliminated the tripod catch, and had smooth sides. The major difference between the M19 and the M1 series are the M19 series' lid skirts, which made the M19 series visually distinctive from the M1 and M2 series. They are designed to lock in place while part-way open to protect the belted ammunition inside from the elements while it feeds into the weapon. The M19 box held 250 belted or linked rounds of .30-06 ammunition. The narrower M19A1 box (1954 to present) was redesigned to hold the shorter, thicker 7.62mm NATO service cartridge, which replaced the .30-06 Springfield in 1954. It also incorporated a series of improvements that corrected faults discovered during the Korean War. The lid was redesigned and the gasket was adjusted to allow it to close properly and remain sealed in cold weather – as the contracting metal would either stick shut or make it impossible to close once opened. An overhang was added to the lid and the latch was made wider to make it easier for soldiers with gloved hands to open it. It had a hollow on the bottom that was high enough to fit over the folding handle on the top of the box beneath it, allowing the boxes to be neatly stacked on top of each other. For ease in loading, a cartridge shape was embossed in the edge of the lid and center of the base to show which way the belt it contained faced (a feature that was later discontinued). It can hold 220 linked or 225 belted 7.62mm NATO rounds in bulk or 2 × 100-round linked belts packed in cartons and carried in bandoleers. The M19A1 box is also used to store pistol ammunition in cartons. (Dimensions: 3 13/16" [96.8mm] Width × 7 1/4" [184.2mm] Height × 11" [279.4mm] Long. Weight: 3.81 lbs. (1.72 kg.) Volume: 0.175 Cubic Feet)
  • The M2 box (September 1942–1950) had 4 rectangular "feet" embossed into the bottom of the box that ran along the edges of the sides, square ribbing around the edges of each side, a foam-rubber gasket, and opened from the front like a tool box. It had a small folding wire handle on the left side corner to secure it to a tripod. On the front side the bottom arc of the ribbing running along the bottom edge was embossed: "AMMO BOX CAL .50 M2". The back side was usually where the content information was stenciled because there was more empty space. It held 110 belted or 105 linked rounds of .50-caliber ammo. (Dimensions: 12 ¼" Length × 6 ¼" Width × 7 ½" Height; Weight (empty): 4.4 lbs.; Gross Weight: 35 lbs.; Volume: 0.33 Cubic Feet).[2]
    The M2A1 Box (1950–present) opens from the side (but lacks the tripod catch of the similar M1 series), has smooth sides and a rubber gasket, had a hollow bottom like the M19 box, and holds a standardized 100 linked rounds. The M2A1 box is commonly used today to store a variety of ammo in cartons, clips, and bandoleers. (Dimensions: 12 1/32" Length × 6 3/32" Width × 7 ½" Height; Weight (empty): ?? lbs. ; Volume: 0.32 Cubic Feet).

Group "P" Material (Ammunition for Heavy Field Artillery and Anti-Aircraft Weapons)[edit]

Class P5E (Ammunition for 37-mm Anti-Aircraft Gun M1A2 and A/N M2)
P5EAC = 10 × 37 mm HE M54 Shell in wooden crate. Weight: ? Volume: 0.85 Cubic Feet.
Class P5H (Ammunition for 40-mm Anti-Aircraft Guns)
P5HVA = 6 × 40 mm HE-Tracer (Self-Destruct MK.11) MK.2 Shell with Point-Detonating Fuse MK.27 (Navy) in wooden crate. Weight: 52 lbs. Volume: 1 Cubic Foot.

Group "R" Material (Ammunition for pack, light, and medium field artillery)[edit]

Sub-Group R1 (Ammunition, fixed and semi-fixed, all types – including subcaliber – for pack, light, and medium field artillery, including complete round data)[edit]

Class R1A (20x110mm Hispano "A"; Ammunition for 20 mm Guns M1, A/N M2, M3, and British Hispano-Suiza "A")[edit]

The "T" (or "Trial") designation was for experimental munitions before they went into standard production. They are placed in parentheses after the standard designation.

R1ABA = 120 rounds of 20 mm High-Explosive-Incendiary Mk.I Cartridge with Point-Detonating Fuze No.253 Mk.I. 10 rounds per moisture-sealed fiberboard container, 12 containers per wooden packing crate. Net Weight = ? lbs. Gross Weight = ? lbs. Volume = 1.45 cubic feet.
R1ACA = 120 rounds of 20 mm Armor-Piercing-Tracer M75 Cartridge. 10 rounds per moisture-sealed fiberboard container, 12 containers per wooden packing crate. Net Weight = ? lbs. Gross Weight = ? lbs. Volume = 1.45 cubic feet.
R1ADA = 120 rounds of 20 mm BALL Mk.I Cartridge. 10 rounds per moisture-sealed fiberboard container, 12 containers per wooden packing crate. Net Weight = ? lbs. Gross Weight = ? lbs. Volume = 1.45 cubic feet.
R1AFA = 120 rounds of 20 mm High Explosive-Incendiary M97 (T23) Cartridge with M75 (T71E5) Point-Detonating Fuze. 10 rounds per moisture-sealed fiberboard container, 12 containers per wooden packing crate. Net Weight = 68.4 lbs. Gross Weight = 95 lbs. Volume = 1.45 cubic feet.
R1AFB = 150 rounds of 20 mm High Explosive-Incendiary M97 (T23) Cartridge with M75 (T71E5) Point-Detonating Fuze. 10 rounds per moisture-sealed fiberboard container, 15 containers per wooden packing crate. Gross Weight = 106 lbs. Volume = 1.49? cubic feet.
R1AJA = 120 rounds of 20 mm Practice (T24) Cartridge. 10 rounds per moisture-sealed fiberboard container, 12 containers per wooden packing crate. Gross Weight = 95 lbs. Volume = 1.45 cubic feet.

Class R1A (20x110mm Hispano "A"; Ammunition for 20 mm Gun M24)[edit]

The 20 mm M24 was a variant of the 20 mm M3 designed to use electrically-fired instead of percussion-fired shells.

R1AMC = 80 rounds of linked 20 mm with electric primers. Wooden crate. Weight: 72 lbs. Volume: 1.2 Cubic Feet.

Class R1B (Belts and Links, 20 mm cartridge)[edit]

R1BAA = M3 Links, Disintegrating Belt, 20 mm, in wooden packing crate.
R1BBA = M4 Links, Disintegrating Belt, 20 mm, in wooden packing crate.

Class R1F (37mmM4 Automatic Gun)[edit]

R1FAA = 37 mm High-Explosive-Tracer M54 Fixed Shell with timed Self-Destruct and M56 Point-Detonating Fuse.
R1FGA = 37 mm Armor-Piercing-Tracer M80 Fixed Shell.

Class R1H (37 mm Gun; Ammunition for Guns M3, M5, and M6)[edit]

NOTE: The M3 was the towed Anti-Tank gun version. The short-barreled M5 and semi-automatic M6 were tank or self-propelled gun variants.

R1HAA = 10 cartridges × 37 mm APC-T M51. Wooden crate. Volume: 0.72 cubic feet.

Class R1J (57 mm Rifle; Ammunition for M18 Recoilless Rifle)[edit]

The M18 was developed in 1944. It was available in Europe by March 1945 and in the Pacific by June 1945.

R1JFS = 4 cartridges × 57 mm HEAT M307A1 with Point-Initiating Fuze M90. Wooden crate. Volume: 1 cu ft.
R1JSA = 4 cartridges × 57 mm TP (Training / Practice). Wooden crate. Volume: 1 cu ft. Weight: 38 lbs.
R1JUA = 4 cartridges × 57 mm Smoke-WP M308A1 with Point-Detonating Fuze M503A1. Wooden crate. Volume: 1 cu ft.

Class R1N (75 mm Rifle; Ammunition for M20 Recoilless Rifle)[edit]

Although the weapon was developed during World War Two, the M20 Recoilless Rifle wasn't ready until the spring of 1945. It served mostly in the Korean and Vietnam Wars.

R1NDA = 2 cartridges × 75 mm HEP-TR. Volume = 1.64 cubic feet.
R1NRA = 2 cartridges × 75 mm HE M309A1 with M51A5 Point-Detonating fuze. Gross Wt. = 75 lbs. Volume = 1.64 cubic feet.
R1NTB = 2 cartridges × 75 mm Training Practice M309A1 with M51A5 Point-Detonating fuze. Gross Wt. = 78 lbs. Volume = 1.64 cubic feet.

Class R1Q (105 mm Howitzer; Semi-Fixed Ammunition for M2, M2A1, and M4 Howitzer)[edit]

"Semi-Fixed" artillery ammunition is composed of a shell and a propellant cartridge. Pre- and early-war semi-fixed ammunition came packed in black fiberboard tubes packed in a long crate with a volume of 1.94 cubic feet.

The M4 Howitzer was a modified version of the M2A1 used with the M4A3 Sherman Assault Support tank.

R1QBA = 2 × 105 mm HE M1 with M48 or M48A2 Point-Detonating Fuze (0.5 second). Gross Weight: 119 Lbs. Volume: 1.8 cubic feet(?).
R1QBS = 2 × 105 mm HE M1 with M48 Point-Detonating Fuze. Volume: 1.8 cubic feet(?).
R1QCB = 3 × 105 mm HE M1 with M54 Timed Super Quick Fuze. Packed in individual inner black cardboard tubes, 3 tubes packed in outer black cardboard tubes conjoined by three-lobed "cloverleaf" endcaps secured by wingnuts on a central carriage bolt through the center, packed in a long triangular-ended slatted wooden crate. Gross Weight: 172 lbs. Volume: 3.24 Cubic Feet.
R1QCC = 2 × 105 mm HE M1 with M54 Timed Super Quick Fuze. Volume: 1.8 cubic feet(?).
R1QDB = 2 × 105 mm HE M1 with M48A1 Point-Detonating Fuze (0.15 second). Volume: 1.8 cubic feet(?).
R1QDN = 1 × 105 mm HE M1 with M48A1 Point-Detonating Fuze (0.15 second). Packed in an inner cardboard tube inside an M152 outer steel tube with a metal screw cap on one end. Gross Weight: 71 lbs. Volume: 0.8 cubic feet.
R1QDT = 2 × 105 mm HE M1 with M48A1 Point-Detonating Fuze (0.15 second). Volume: 1.8 cubic feet(?).
R1QEB = 2 × 105 mm HEAT M67. Gross Weight: 110 lbs. Volume: 1.8 cubic feet.
R1QGC = 2 × 105 mm Training-Practice M1 empty with inert M48 Point-Detonating Fuze. Gross Weight: 110 lbs. Volume: 1.8 cubic feet.
R1QIA = 2 × 105 mm Casualty Gas (H) M60 with M57 Point-Detonating Fuze. Gross Weight: 121 lbs. Volume: 1.8 cubic feet.
R1QJA = 2 × 105 mm Smoke (WP) M60 with M57 Point-Detonating Fuze. Gross Weight: 123 lbs. Volume: 1.8 cubic feet.
R1QMA = 2 × 105 mm Riot Control Gas (CS) M60. Volume: 1.8 cubic feet.
R1QNA = 2 × 105 mm HE M1 with cavity for T80E6 Variable Time Fuze. Gross Weight: 120 lbs. Volume: 1.8 cubic feet.
R1QSA = 2 × 105 mm HE M1 (TNT Filler) with M48A2 Point-Detonating Fuze (0.15 second). Gross Weight: 120 lbs. Volume: 1.8 cubic feet.
R1QSN = 1 × 105 mm HE M1 (TNT Filler) with M48A2 Point-Detonating Fuze (0.15 second). Packed in an inner cardboard tube inside an M152 outer steel tube with a metal screw cap on one end. Gross Weight: 71 lbs. Volume: 0.8 cubic feet.

Sub-Group R2 (Projectiles and separate-loading propelling charges for medium field artillery, including complete round data)[edit]

[icon]

This section is empty. You can help by adding to it. (March 2013)

Sub-Group R3 (Service fuzes and primers for pack, light, and medium field artillery)[edit]

Class R3F (155 mm Howitzer projectile fuzes)[edit]

R3FDA 25 × M51A3 Point Detonating Fuzes with M21A2 Booster. Wooden Crate.

Sub-Group R4 (Ammunition for trench mortars; including fuzes, propelling charges and other components)[edit]

Class R4C (Ammunition for 60mm M2 Light Mortar)[edit]

R4CAC = 10 cartridges of 60 mm HE M49A2 w/. Point Detonating fuze M52B1 in tarpaper storage tubes in a wooden crate. Gross Weight: 49 lbs. Volume: 1.0 Cubic Feet.
R4CHA = 60 mm in wooden crate.
R4CPN = 10 rounds of 60 mm Bursting Smoke (White Phosphorus) M302 w/ Point Detonating fuze M527 in tarpaper storage tubes in a wooden crate. Volume: 1.0 Cubic Feet.

Class R4F (Ammunition for 81-mm M1 Medium Mortar or 3-Inch (3.2" [81-mm]) Mk.1A2 Stokes Trench Mortar)[edit]

The 81 mm Mortar shells used an adapter collar to allow 60 mm mortar shell fuzes to fit. Originally packed in wooden crates, the late war shells (1944–1945) were packed in metal M140 canisters. The M140 canister carried live shells in a four-chambered internal divider, had a horsehair pad in the inside of the lid to cushion the fuzes, and had a metal loop carrying handle on the lid that doubled as the locking catch. The M140A1 canister eliminated the divider and carried the shells in tarpaper packing tubes instead.

R4FCM = 4 cartridges of 81-mm M43A1 Light HE w/. Point Detonating fuze M52B1 with booster charges, packed in M140 (T16) metal canister. Gross Weight: 48.5 lbs. Volume: 0.71 Cubic Feet.

Class R4H (Ammunition for 81 mm M29 or M1 Medium Mortar)[edit]

R4HUA = 4 cartridges of 81-mm M43A1 Light HE w/. Point Detonating fuze M52B1 with booster charges, packed in wooden crate. Gross Weight: 50.0 lbs. Volume: 1.04 Cubic Feet.
R4HSA = 4 cartridges of 81-mm M43A1 Light HE w/. Point Detonating fuze M52A2 with booster charges, packed in wooden crate. Gross Weight: 50.0 lbs. Volume: 1.04 Cubic Feet.

Class R4N (Ammunition for 4.2" [107 mm] M2 Chemical Mortar)[edit]

R4NAA = 2 cartridges of 4.2" HE M3 w/. M9 Fuze and M6 Propellant Charges in wooden crate. Gross Weight: 56 lbs. Volume: 1.1 Cubic Feet.

Sub-Group R5 (Ammunition, blank, for Pack, Light, and Medium field artillery)[edit]

Group R5C (Ammunition for 57mm Anti-Tank Gun M1 and 6-Pounder QF 7-cwt Gun)[edit]

R5CHA = ? × 57 mm / 6 Pdr. cartridges Blank. Volume: ? cubic feet.

Group R5I (Ammunition for 76mm Gun M1, M1A1, and M1A2)[edit]

R5IAA = 8 × 76 mm cartridges Blank. Volume: 1.12 cubic feet.

Sub-Group R6 (Ammunition instruction material for pack, light, and medium field artillery)[edit]

[icon]

This section is empty. You can help by adding to it. (March 2013)

Sub-Group R7 (Land Mines and Fuzes, Demolition Material, and Ammunition for Simulated Artillery and Grenade Fire)[edit]

Class R7A (Land Mines)[edit]

R7AI (Anti-Tank Mine M1A1)
R7AIA = 5 × AT Mine M1A1 and 5 × Fuze M1A2 in wooden crate.

Class R7B (Arming Plugs for Land Mines)[edit]

R7BJ (Arming Plug M4 for Anti-Tank Mine M15)
R7BJA = 120 × M4 Arming Plugs for M15 AT Mine in wooden crate.

Class R7D (Practice Land Mines)[edit]

R7DL (M12A1 Practice Heavy Anti-Tank Land Mine, Empty)
R7DLB = 2 × M12A1 Practice Heavy Land Mines in wooden crate. Gross Weight: 40 lbs. Volume: 1.56 Cubic Feet
R7DSA = 6 anti personnel mines in wooden crate.

Class R7E ()[edit]

R7EV
R7EVA = 1 x M3 Shaped Charge [40 lbs.] in wooden crate. Gross Weight: 67 lbs. Volume: 1.85 Cubic Feet.

Class R7F ()[edit]

R7FA (M1A1 Bangalore Torpedo)
R7FAB = 10 × M1A1 Bangalore Torpedoes in Wooden Crate. Gross Weight: 176 lbs. Volume: 4.1 Cubic Feet.

Class R7H (Demolition Material)[edit]

R7HCA 16 × M2 Demolition Charge (Tetrytol) [2.5 lbs. each], 8 charges (plus fuze train assembly) per haversack [21 lbs.], 2 haversacks per wooden crate. Net Weight: 42 lbs. Gross Weight: 67 lbs. Volume: 1.3 cubic feet.
R7HDA 16 × M3 Demolition Charge (Composition C3) [2.25 lbs. each], 8 charges (plus fuze train assembly) per haversack [19 lbs.], 2 haversacks per wooden crate. Net Weight: 38 lbs. Gross Weight: 44 lbs. Volume: 0.91 cubic feet.

Class R7L (Demolition Kits)[edit]

R7LY (Demolition Kit M37)
R7LYA = 2 × M37 Demolition Kits in wooden crate. Gross Wt.: 57 lbs., Volume: 1.4 Cu. Ft.

Sub-Group R8 (Ammunition, complete, nonstandard)[edit]

[icon]

This section is empty. You can help by adding to it. (March 2013)

Sub-Group R9 (?)[edit]

[icon]

This section is empty. You can help by adding to it. (March 2013)

Sub-Group R10 (Packing materials used by field service)[edit]

Group "S" Material (Bombs, grenades, pyrotechnics)[edit]

Sub-Group S1 (Bombs, aircraft, all types)[edit]

S1DDABomb, GP, 250lb AN-M57A1 (Tritonal Filling), with transit hoops
S1DGABomb, GP, 1000lb AN-M65A1 (Tritonal Filling), with transit hoops
S1FKA 2 × Bombs, Fragmentation, 23lb M72, with fuzes, in wooden crate
S1GDABomb, Chemical, 500lb AN-M78 (AC Filling), with transit hoops
S1HGABomb, GP, 1000lb AN-M65A1 (TNT Filling), with transit hoops
S1HMABomb, GP, 1000lb AN-M65A1 (Composition B Filling), with transit hoops
S1HTABomb, GP, 500lb AN-M64A1 (TNT Filling), with transit hoops
S1HVACluster, Fragmentation, 500lb size T4E4 (AN-M26), of 20 × Bombs, Fragmentation, AN-M41A1, in steel drum
S1HWABomb, GP, 500lb AN-M64A1 (Composition B Filling), with transit hoops
S1ICABomb, GP, 500lb AN-M64A1 (Tritonal Filling), with transit hoops
S1VAACluster, Fragmentation, 100lb size AN-M1A2, of 6 × Bombs, Fragmentation, 20lb AN-M41A1, unfuzed, in wooden crate
S1VBACluster, Fragmentation, 100lb size AN-M4A1, of 3 × Bombs, Fragmentation, 23lb AN-M40 or AN-M40A1, unfuzed, in wooden crate
S1ZVACluster, Practice, 100lb size M2, of 6 × Bombs, Practice, 20lb M48 with Fuzes M110, in wooden crate
S1ZVBCluster, Fragmentation, 100lb size M1, of 6 × Bombs, Fragmentation, 20lb M41 with Fuzes M110, in wooden crate
S1ZVDCluster, Fragmentation, 100lb size M1A1, of 6 × Bombs, Fragmentation, 20lb M48 with Fuzes M110, in wooden crate
S1ZVECluster, Practice, 100lb size M2A1, of 6 × Bombs, Practice, 20lb M48 with Fuzes M110, in wooden crate
S1ZVFCluster, Fragmentation, 100lb size M4, of 3 × Bombs, Fragmentation, 23lb M40 with Fuzes M104, in wooden crate
S1ZVGCluster, Fragmentation, 100lb size M1, of 6 × Bombs, Fragmentation, 20lb M41 with Fuzes M110A1, in wooden crate
S1ZVHCluster, Fragmentation, 100lb size M1A1, of 6 × Bombs, Fragmentation, 20lb M41 with Fuzes M110, in wooden crate
S1ZVICluster, Practice, 100lb size M2, of 6 × Bombs, Practice, 20lb M48 with Fuzes M110A1, in wooden crate
S1ZVJCluster, Practice, 100lb size M2A1, of 6 × Bombs, Practice, 20lb M48 with Fuzes M110A1, in wooden crate
S1ZVKCluster, Fragmentation, 100lb size M4, of 3 × Bombs, Fragmentation, 23lb M40 with fuzes M120 in wooden crate
S1ZVLCluster, Fragmentation, 100lb size AN-M1A1, of 6 × Bombs, Fragmentation, 20lb AN-M41 with Fuzes AN-M110A1, in wooden crate
S1ZVNCluster, Fragmentation, 100lb size AN-M4, of 3 × Bombs, Fragmentation, 23lb AN-M40 with Fuzes AN-M104, in wooden crate
S1ZVOCluster, Fragmentation, 100lb size AN-M4, of 3 × Bombs, Fragmentation, 23lb AN-M40 with fuzes AN-M120 in wooden crate
S1ZVPCluster, Practice, 100lb size AN-M2A1, of 6 × Bombs, Practice, 20lb AN-M48 with Fuzes M110A1, in wooden crate
S1ZVQCluster, Fragmentation, 500lb size AN-M26, of 20 × Bombs, Fragmentation, 20lb AN-M41 with Fuzes AN-M110A1, in steel drum
S1ZVTCluster, Practice, 100lb size AN-M2A1, of 6 × Bombs, Practice, 20lb AN-M48 with Fuzes M110, in wooden crate.

Sub-Group S2 (Fuzes and miscellaneous explosive components for aircraft bombs)[edit]

AN- stands for "Army / Navy", meaning it is a common supply item for both the War and Navy departments.

S2FRB = 9 × Fuzes, Bomb, Tail, AN-M100A2 (Non-Delay), in metal cans, in wooden crate.
S2MUA = 30 × Fuzes, Bomb, Nose, AN-M158, in metal cans, in wooden crate.
S2NLA = 48 × Fuzes, Bomb, Nose, AN-M126A1, in metal cans, in wooden crate.
S2NRA = 25 × Fuzes, Bomb, Nose, AN-M103A1, in metal cans, in wooden crate.
S2QNA = 25 × Fuzes, Bomb, Tail, AN-M100A1, in metal cans, in wooden crate.
S2QQB = 9 × Fuzes, Bomb, Tail, AN-M102A2 (.025 Sec Delay), in metal cans, in wooden crate.

Sub-Group S3 (Fin assemblies, and miscellaneous inert components for aircraft bombs)[edit]

S3FHB = 20 × Containers, 100 Arming Wire Assemblies, in wooden crate.
S3JWA = Fin Assembly, 250lb size, AN-M106A1, with/without accessories, in metal crate.
S3POB = 5 × Arming Wire Assemblies for Bomb, Chemical, 100lb M47A2, in round metal tin.
S3RHB = 5 × Arming Wire Assemblies for Bomb, Fragmentation, 260lb AN-M81, in round metal tin.

Sub-Group S4 (Grenades, hand and rifle, and fuzing components)[edit]

Class S4F (Rifle Grenades, Signal, Colored Smoke, Ground, for Grenade Launchers M1, M2, M7, & M8)[edit]

S4FH (M23A1 Rifle Grenade, Smoke Streamer, Green)
S4FHA = 10 × M23A1 Rifle Grenades in fiberboard tubes in wooden crate. Comes with 3 Launcher Positioning Clips and an M13 Grenade Launcher Assortment metal ammo can (1 × 10-round carton of .30-'06 Grenade Blank M3 and 2 × 5-round packets (10 cartridges) of M7 Grenade Auxiliary Cartridges). Gross Weight: 38 lbs. Volume: 0.98 cubic feet.

Class S4G (Mk.II Fragmentation Grenade)[edit]

S4GCA = 25 × Mk.2 Fragmentation Grenades (Fuse M10A2 or M10A3) in M41 Fiber Containers (fiberboard storage tubes) in a wooden crate. Gross Weight: 53 lbs. Volume: 1.28 Cubic Feet.
S4GIA = 25 × Mk.2 Fragmentation Grenades (Fuse M10A3) in M41 Fiber Containers (fiberboard storage tubes) in a wooden crate. Gross Weight: 53 lbs. Volume: 1.25 Cubic Feet.
S4GIA = 25 × Mk.2 Fragmentation Grenades (Fuse M6A4C) in M41 Fiber Containers (fiberboard storage tubes) in a wooden crate. Gross Weight: 55 lbs. Volume: 1.26 Cubic Feet.
S4GQA = 25 × Mk.2 Fragmentation Grenades (Fuse M204A1) in M41 Fiber Containers (fiberboard storage tubes) in a wooden crate. Gross Weight: 53 lbs. Volume: 1.25 Cubic Feet.

Class S4K (Mk.III Offensive Grenade)[edit]

Note: Since it was a high explosive grenade, they were shipped without fuzes to prevent accidental detonation during shipping.

S4KBA = 50 × Mk.3A2 Offensive Grenades (Unfused) in a wooden crate. The Mk.3A2 grenade used the M6A3 igniter fuse, later replaced with the M206 fuze.

Class S4N (M9 Anti-Tank Rifle Grenade)[edit]

S4NBA = 10 × M9A1 HEAT Rifle Grenades packed in fiberboard storage tubes in a wooden crate with metal M13 Grenade Launcher Assortment ammo can (1 carton of 10 × .30-'06 Grenade Blank M3 cartridges and 2 packets of 5 × M7 Grenade Auxiliary Blank Cartridges). Gross Weight: 32 lbs.
S4NBB = 10 × M9A1 HEAT Rifle Grenades packed in fiberboard storage tubes in a wooden crate with metal M13 Grenade Launcher Assortment ammo can (1 carton of 10 × .30-'06 Grenade Blank M3 cartridges, 1 carton of 6 × .30 Carbine Grenade Blank M6 cartridges, and 1 packet of 5 × M7 Grenade Auxiliary Cartridges). Gross Weight: 32 lbs.
S4NGA = 50 × M11A2 Practice HEAT Rifle Grenades packed in fiberboard storage tubes in a wooden crate with 5 metal M13 Grenade Launcher Assortment ammo cans (1 carton of 10 × .30-'06 Grenade Blank M3 cartridges, 1 carton of 6 × .30 Carbine Grenade Blank M6 cartridges, and 1 packet of 5 × M7 Grenade Auxiliary Cartridges). Gross Weight: 32 lbs. Volume: 3.5 Cubic Feet.

Class S4Q (Adapter, Grenade Projection)[edit]

S4QF (M1A1 Grenade Projection Adapter, for use with the Mk.II Fragmentation Grenade)

Note: The M1A1 Grenade Projection Adapter converted a Mk.II fragmentation grenade into a rifle grenade.

S4QFD = 48 × M1A1 Grenade Projection Adapters. Comes with 5 × metal M13 Grenade Launcher Assortment ammo cans (1 carton of 10 × .30-'06 Grenade Blank M3 cartridges, 1 carton of 6 × .30 Carbine Grenade Blank M6 cartridges, and 1 packet of 5 × M7 Grenade Auxiliary Cartridges). Volume: 1.75 Cubic Feet.

Sub-Group S5 (Pyrotechnics, military, all types)[edit]

Class S5P (Signal, Illumination, Aircraft, for Pyrotechnic Pistol AN-M8)[edit]

S5PD (Aircraft Illumination Signal, 37 mm AN-M37A1, Double Star Flare, Red-Red)
S5PDC = 72 cartridges × Signal, Illumination, Aircraft, 37 mm AN-M37A1, Double Star Flare, Red-Red, 6 cartons of 12 cartridges each, in wooden crate. Gross Weight: 36 lbs. Volume: 0.75 cubic feet.

Class S5R (Signal, Illumination, Ground, for Grenade Launchers M1, M2, M7, & M8)[edit]

S5RM (M22A1 Rifle Grenade, Ground Signal, Amber Star Cluster Flare)
S5RMB 30 × M19A1 rifle grenades, in fiberboard tubes, in wooden crate. Comes with 3 × M13 metal Grenade Launcher Assortment ammo cans (1 carton of 10 × .30-'06 M3 Grenade Blank cartridges, 1 carton of 6 × .30 Carbine M6 Grenade Blank cartridges, and 1 packet of 5 × M7 Grenade Auxiliary Cartridges).
S5RO (M21A1 Rifle Grenade, Ground Signal, Amber Star Parachute Flare)
S5ROB 30 × M21A1 rifle grenades, in fiberboard tubes, in wooden crate. Comes with 3 × M13 metal Grenade Launcher Assortment ammo cans (1 carton of 10 × .30-'06 M3 Grenade Blank cartridges, 1 carton of 6 × .30 Carbine M6 Grenade Blank cartridges, and 1 packet of 5 × M7 Grenade Auxiliary Cartridges).
S5RP (M20A1 Rifle Grenade, Ground Signal, Green Star Cluster Flare)
S5RPB 30 × M20A1 rifle grenades, in fiberboard tubes, in wooden crate. Comes with 3 × M13 metal Grenade Launcher Assortment ammo cans (1 carton of 10 × .30-'06 M3 Grenade Blank cartridges, 1 carton of 6 × .30 Carbine M6 Grenade Blank cartridges, and 1 packet of 5 × M7 Grenade Auxiliary Cartridges).
S5RQ (M19A1 Rifle Grenade, Ground Signal, Green Star Parachute Flare)
S5RQB 30 × M19A1 rifle grenades, in fiberboard tubes, in wooden crate. Comes with 3 × M13 metal Grenade Launcher Assortment ammo cans (1 carton of 10 × .30-'06 M3 Grenade Blank cartridges, 1 carton of 6 × .30 Carbine M6 Grenade Blank cartridges, and 1 packet of 5 × M7 Grenade Auxiliary Cartridges).
S5RR (M18A1 Rifle Grenade, Ground Signal, White Star Cluster Flare)
S5RRB 30 × M18A1 rifle grenades, in fiberboard tubes, in wooden crate. Comes with 3 × M13 metal Grenade Launcher Assortment ammo cans (1 carton of 10 × .30-'06 M3 Grenade Blank cartridges, 1 carton of 6 × .30 Carbine M6 Grenade Blank cartridges, and 1 packet of 5 × M7 Grenade Auxiliary Cartridges).
S5RS (M17A1 Rifle Grenade, Ground Signal, White Star Parachute Flare)
S5RSB 30 × M17A1 rifle grenades, in fiberboard tubes, in wooden crate. Comes with 3 × M13 metal Grenade Launcher Assortment ammo cans (1 carton of 10 × .30-'06 M3 Grenade Blank cartridges, 1 carton of 6 × .30 Carbine M6 Grenade Blank cartridges, and 1 packet of 5 × M7 Grenade Auxiliary Cartridges).
S5RT (M51A1 Rifle Grenade, Ground Signal, Red Star Parachute Flare)
S5RTA 48 × M51A1 rifle grenades, in fiberboard tubes, in wooden crate. Comes with 5 × M13 metal Grenade Launcher Assortment ammo cans (1 carton of 10 × .30-'06 M3 Grenade Blank cartridges and 1 carton of 6 × .30 Carbine M6 Grenade Blank cartridges). Gross Weight: 86 lbs. Volume: 2.46 cubic feet.
S5RTB 30 × M51A1 rifle grenades, in fiberboard tubes, in wooden crate. Comes with 3 × M13 metal Grenade Launcher Assortment ammo cans (1 carton of 10 × .30-'06 M3 Grenade Blank cartridges, 1 carton of 6 × .30 Carbine M6 Grenade Blank cartridges, and 1 packet of 5 × M7 Grenade Auxiliary Cartridges).
S5RU (M52A1 Rifle Grenade, Ground Signal, Red Star Cluster Flare)
S5RUB 30 × M52A1 rifle grenades, in fiberboard tubes, in wooden crate. Comes with 3 × M13 metal Grenade Launcher Assortment ammo cans (1 carton of 10 × .30-'06 M3 Grenade Blank cartridges, 1 carton of 6 × .30 Carbine M6 Grenade Blank cartridges, and 1 packet of 5 × M7 Grenade Auxiliary Cartridges).

Sub-Group S6 (Ammunition instruction material for grenades, pyrotechnics, and aircraft bombs)[edit]

[icon]

This section is empty. You can help by adding to it. (March 2013)

Sub-Group S7 (Guided missile complete rounds, all types)[edit]

[icon]

This section is empty. You can help by adding to it. (March 2013)

Sub-Group S8 (Guided missile explosive components, all types)[edit]

[icon]

This section is empty. You can help by adding to it. (March 2013)

Sub-Group S9 (Rockets, all types)[edit]

Class S9A (2.36" Rocket for Anti-Tank Rocket Launchers M1, M1A1, M9, & M9A1)[edit]

Note = The fiberboard packing tubes are sealed with colored tape. The color of the tape indicates what type of rocket it is: yellow is HEAT, gray is Smoke, and blue is Practice.[3] Early M6 HE (AT) and M7 Practice rockets can only be fired out of M1 launchers because they have an earlier ignition system that cannot be activated out of an M1A1, M9, or M9A1 launcher.[4]

  • S9ACA = 20 × 2.36" M6A1 Rockets, HE (Anti-Tank), in M87 fiberboard tubes, in wooden crate. Gross Weight: 128 lbs. Volume: 3.7 cubic feet. For use with M1A1 Rocket Launcher.
  • S9AKA = 12 × 2.36" M10 Rockets, Bursting Smoke (White Phosphorus), in fiberboard tubes, in wooden crate. Gross Weight: 68 lbs. Volume: 2.4 cubic feet.
  • S9ALA = 8 × 2.36" M6A3 HE (Anti-Tank) Rockets, in M87 fiberboard tubes, in wooden crate. Gross Weight: 54 lbs.Volume: 1.41 cubic feet. For use with M9 and M9A1 Rocket Launcher.
  • S9ASB = 8 × 2.36" M7A6 Rockets, Practice, in fiberboard tubes, in wooden crate. Gross Weight: 53 lbs.Volume: 1.41 cubic feet.

Class S9IKA (Fuses for Rockets)[edit]

  • S9IKA = 12 × Variable Time (VT) Fuze M402 in metal packing box. Gross Weight: 67 lbs.Volume: 1.24 cubic feet.

Class S9J (3.5" Rocket for Anti-Tank Rocket Launcher M20)[edit]

  • S9JKA = 3 × 3.5" M28 Rockets, HE (Anti-Tank) in fiberboard tubes, in a wooden crate. Gross Weight: 53 lbs. Volume: 1.59 cubic feet.
  • S9JNA = 3 × 3.5" M28A2 Rockets, HE (Anti-Tank) w/. Composition B warhead in fiberboard tubes, in a wooden crate. Gross Weight: 55.7 lbs. Volume: 1.45 cubic feet.

Sub-Group S10 (Obsolete and nonstandard bombs, grenades, pyrotechnics, and rockets)[edit]

[icon]

This section is empty. You can help by adding to it. (March 2013)

Sub-Group S11 (Materials for renovating and packaging of Group "S" ammunition and miscellaneous items)[edit]

Group "T" Material (Small Arms Ammunition)[edit]

Sub-Group T1 (Ammunition for Rifle, Carbine and Automatic Gun)[edit]

After 1948, the AIC number "1" was replaced by the letter "A" to indicate the small arms ammunition was packed in the new M20 or M21 ammo cans instead of the myriad WWII-era packing boxes and cans.

Class T1A (.22 Long Rifle; Gallery Practice Ammunition)[edit]

The military used .22-caliber training rifles to teach basic marksmanship before transitioning to full-bore service rifles.

T1AAA = 10,000 cartridges of .22 Long Rifle Ball, in 50-round cartons. They were packed 10 cartons per cardboard box (500 rounds) and there were 20 boxes per wooden crate. Gross Weight: 85 lbs. Volume: 0.7 Cubic Feet.
TAAAA = 6,000 cartridges of .22 Long Rifle Ball, in cartons, in M20 ammo cans (3,000 rounds), 2 × M20 cans in an M22 wooden crate. Gross Weight: 60 lbs. Volume: 0.75 Cubic Feet.

Class T1C (.30 Carbine; Ammunition for .30-caliber Carbine M1)[edit]

This ammunition was for use with the M1 Carbine, a different weapon than the M1 Garand Rifle. The primers for the cartridges were non-corrosive because the M1 carbine's gas-system would have fouled or corroded if standard corrosive primers were used. It only came in Grade R ("Rifle") because the M1 Carbine was semi-automatic only, dispensing with the use for Grade 2 for an automatic weapon.

Cartons (1942–1948)

Note = .30 Carbine ammunition was not carried or packed in bandoleers during World War 2.
T1CAA = 3,000 cartridges of .30 Carbine Ball M1 (Grade R) in 50-round cartons, 30 cartons per T3 waxed box (1500 rounds), 2 T3 waxed boxes per T3 wooden crate (3,000 rounds total). Changed to 50-round packaging in 1942 to make it quicker to distribute ammunition. Gross Weight: 98 lbs. Volume: 0.83 cubic feet.
T1CAD = 2,700 cartridges of .30 Carbine Ball M1 (Grade R) in 45-round cartons packed in a metal-lined M1917 wooden Packing Box. There were 60 cartons per box. Pre-War 45-round packing; each carton was divided into three 15-round packs so there would be no ammunition wasted. Volume: 0.83 cubic feet.
T1CAE = 2,000 cartridges of .30 Carbine Ball M1 (Grade R) in 50-round cartons packed in a commercial packing box. There were 40 cartons per box.
T1CAF = 3,450 cartridges of .30 Carbine Ball M1 (Grade R) in 50-round cartons packed in a commercial packing box. There were 69 cartons per box. Gross Weight: 112 lbs. Volume: 0.92 Cu. Ft.
T1CAF = 3,200 cartridges of .30 Carbine Ball M1 (Grade R) in 50-round cartons packed in M6 ammo cans. Each M6 ammo can contained 16 cartons (800 rounds). There were 4 × M6 ammo cans per crate.
T1CAH = 2,400 cartridges of .30 Carbine Ball M1 (Grade R) in 50-round cartons packed in M6 ammo cans. Each M6 ammo can contained 16 cartons (800 rounds). There were 3 × M6 ammo cans per M4 crate. Gross Weight: 85 lbs. Volume: 0.87 cubic feet.
T1CAI = 3,150 cartridges of .30 Carbine Ball M1 (Grade R) in 50-round cartons packed in a metal-lined wooden box. There were 63 cartons per box. Gross Weight: 108 lbs. Volume: 1 cubic foot.
T1CAJ = 1,600 cartridges of .30 Carbine Ball M1 (Grade R) in 50-round cartons packed in M6 ammo cans. Each M6 ammo can contained 16 cartons (800 rounds). There were 2 × M6 ammo cans per M7 ammo crate. Gross Weight: 59 lbs. Volume: 0.662 cubic feet.
T1CAZ = 4,800 cartridges of .30 Carbine Ball M1 (Grade R) in 50-round cartons packed in M6 ammo cans. Each M6 ammo can contained 16 cartons (800 rounds). There were 6 × M6 ammo cans per crate.

Cartons (1948–1958)

TACAA = 1,800 cartridges of .30 Carbine Ball M1 in 50-round cartons packed in M20 ammo cans. Each M20 ammo can contained 18 cartons (900 rounds). There were 2 × M20 ammo cans per M22 ammo crate. Gross Weight: 49 lbs. Volume: 0.75 Cu. Ft.

Bandoleers (1948–1958)

After World War II .30 Carbine ammunition began being packed in stripper clips. Each M1 bandoleer had 6 pockets (containing 2 stripper clips each) for a total of 120 rounds per bandolier. The stripper clips did not require a separate magazine guide because they had a magazine guide built-in to speed reloading.
TACAL = 1,200 cartridges of .30 Carbine Ball M1 in 10-round stripper clips in bandoleers packed in M20 ammo cans. Each M20 ammo can contained 5 pre-packed M1 bandoleers (600 rounds total). There were 2 × M20 ammo cans per M22 ammo crate. Gross Weight: 51 lbs. Volume: 0.75 cubic feet.
TACCA = 1,200 cartridges of .30 Carbine Tracer M27 in 10-round stripper clips in M1 bandoleers packed in M20 ammo cans. Each M1 bandoleer had 6 pockets (containing 2 stripper clips each) for a total of 120 rounds per bandolier. Each M20 ammo can contained 5 pre-packed M1 bandoleers (600 rounds total). There were 2 × M20 ammo cans per M22 ammo crate. Gross Weight: 52 lbs. Volume: 0.75 Cubic Feet

Class T1E (Caliber .30; Ammunition for .30-caliber Rifles and Machine Guns)[edit]

This ammunition was used in the M1903 Springfield, M1917 Enfield, and M1 Garand rifles, the Browning Automatic Rifle (BAR), and the Browning M1917 water-cooled and Browning M1919 air-cooled machine guns.

There were three cartridge grades based on accuracy and reliability: "AC/R", "MG", and "3". Test batches would be randomly drawn from a lot and they would be chambered and fired individually from a fixed bench-rested barrel and mechanism at a stationary round "bullseye" target 600 feet away. "AC" (Aircraft), the most accurate and reliable, was similar to the RAF's "Red Label" ammunition used in their synchronized aircraft machine guns. It had to be grouped within a 5-inch circle and not exceed a specified maximum number of stoppages to be acceptable. It came in metal linked belts and was suitable for aircraft and anti-aircraft machine-guns. "R" (Rifle) had to be grouped within a 5-inch circle; it came packed in cartons or bandoleers and was suitable for use in rifles. "MG" (Machine Gun), the least accurate, had to be grouped within a 7.5-inch circle; it came in woven belts and was suitable for use in ground machine-guns. Class 3 (Unsuitable) was rejected for not meeting standards.

Ammunition Lot Numbers had a code letter prefix in-between the Manufacturer code and Lot Number to indicate how it was packed: "C" indicated rifle ammunition preloaded in clips, "B" indicated Belted (woven cloth belt) machine gun ammunition, and "L" indicated Linked (disintegrating metal link belt) machine gun ammunition.

Cartons (1939–1948)

T1EDM = 1500 cartridges .30-06 AP M2, in 20-round cartons, 75 cartons per metal-lined wooden crate M1917. Gross Weight: 113 lbs. Volume: 1.5 cubic feet.
T1EDW = 1320 cartridges .30-06 AP M2, in 20-round cartons, 11 cartons per M10 ammo can (220 rounds), 6 × M10 ammo cans per M? wooden crate. Gross Weight: ? Volume: 1.5 cubic feet.
T1EPD = 1500 Cartridges .30-06 Tracer M1, in 20-round cartons, 75 cartons per metal-lined wooden crate M1917. Gross Weight: 108 lbs. Volume: 1.5 cubic feet.
T1EGM = 960 cartridges .30-06 Ball M2, in 20-round cartons, 12 cartons per waxed cardboard box (240 rounds), 4 × waxed cardboard boxes per wooden crate. Gross Weight: 72 lbs. Volume: 1.2 cubic feet.
T1EGN = 1500 cartridges .30-06 Ball M2, in 20-round cartons, 75 cartons per metal-lined wooden crate M1917. Gross Weight: 113 lbs. Volume: 1.5 cubic feet.
T1EHW = ? cartridges .30-06 Ball M2, in 20-round cartons, 11 cartons per M10 ammo can (220 rounds), ? × M10 ammo cans per M? wooden crate.

Cartons (1948–1958)

TAEHB = 1040 cartridges .30-06 Ball M2, in 20-round cartons, 26 cartons per M21 ammo can (520 rounds), 2 × M21 ammo cans per M23 wooden crate. Gross Weight: 83 lbs. Volume: 1.2 cubic feet.
TAEPA = 1040 cartridges .30-06 TR M25, in 20-round cartons, 26 cartons per M21 ammo can (520 rounds), 2 × M21 ammo cans per M23 wooden crate. Volume: 1.2 cubic feet.

Bandoleers (1939–1948)
Note: 5-round Mauser-style stripper clips were used by the M1903 Springfield and M1917 Enfield. 8-round Mannlicher-style en-bloc clips were used by the M1 Garand. The M1 Bandoleer had six pockets; each pocket could hold either two 5-round stripper clips (60 rounds total) or one 8-round en-bloc clip (48 rounds total).
The symbol for ammunition packed in stripper clips was 5 bullets conjoined by a long rectangle across the base (looking like 5 bullets in a Mauser clip); there were two symbols in a vertical column per side. The symbol for ammunition packed in en-bloc clips was a rectangular oval with 2 rows of 4 dots (looking like eight rounds in an en-bloc clip); there were one or two symbols in a vertical column per side.

T1EDC = 1500 cartridges .30-06 AP M2, 5-round stripper clips in bandoleers (12 clips / 60 rounds), 25 bandoleers per metal-lined wooden chest M1917. Volume: 1.5 cubic feet.
T1EDV = 1344 cartridges .30-06 AP M2, 8-round en-bloc clips in bandoleers (6 clips / 48 rounds), 28 bandoleers per metal-lined wooden chest M1917. Gross Weight: 111 lbs. Volume: 1.5 cubic feet.
T1EFA = 1200 cartridges .30-06 Ball M1, 8-round stripper clips in bandoleers (6 clips / 48 rounds), 25 bandoleers per metal-lined wooden chest M1917. Volume: 1.5 cubic feet.
T1EGK = 1500 cartridges .30-06 Ball M2, 5-round stripper clips in bandoleers (12 clips / 60 rounds), 25 bandoleers per metal-lined wooden chest M1917. Gross Weight: 112 lbs. Volume: 1.5 cubic feet.
T1EHA = 1344 cartridges .30-06 Ball M2, 8-round en-bloc clips in bandoleers (6 clips / 48 rounds), 28 bandoleers per metal-lined wooden chest M1917. Gross Weight: 108 lbs. Volume: 1.5 cubic feet.
T1EHO = 480 cartridges .30-06 Ball M2, 5-round clips in bandoleers (12 clips / 60 rounds), 4 bandoleers per M8 ammo can (240 rounds), 2 × M8 ammo cans per M9 wooden crate. Gross Weight: 42 lbs. Volume: 0.7 cubic feet.
T1EHP = 480 cartridges .30-06 Ball M2, 8-round clips in bandoleers (6 clips / 48 rounds), 5 bandoleers per M8 ammo can (240 rounds), 2 × M8 ammo cans per M9 wooden crate. Gross Weight: 46 lbs. Volume: 0.7 cubic feet.
T1EPC = 1500 cartridges .30-06 Tracer M1, 5-round stripper clips in bandoleers (12 clips / 60 rounds), 25 bandoleers per metal-lined wooden chest M1917
T1EPM = 1344 cartridges .30-06 Tracer M1, 8-round en-bloc clips in bandoleers (6 clips / 48 rounds), 28 bandoleers per metal-lined wooden chest M1917

Bandoleers (1948–1958)
Note: The ammunition now only came in 8-round en-bloc clips because the M1 Garand was the standard service rifle.

TAEAB = 384 cartridges .30-06 AP M2, 8-round en-bloc clips in bandoleers (6 clips / 48 rounds), 4 bandoleers per metal M20 ammo can (192 rounds), 2 × M20 ammo cans per M22 wooden crate. Gross Weight: 39.2 lbs. Volume: 0.76 cubic feet.
TAEGA = 384 cartridges .30-06 Ball M2, 8-round en-bloc clips in bandoleers (6 clips / 48 rounds), 4 bandoleers per metal M20 ammo can (192 rounds), 2 × M20 ammo cans per M22 wooden crate. Gross Weight: 38 lbs. Volume: 0.76 cubic feet.
TAE## = 768 cartridges .30-06 Ball M2, 8-round en-bloc clips in bandoleers (6 clips / 48 rounds), 4 bandoleers per metal M20 ammo can (192 rounds), 4 × M20 ammo cans per wooden crate. Gross Weight:71 lbs. Volume: 1.4 cubic feet.

Belted
Note: The symbol for belted or linked 0.30-06 Springfield ammunition was a vertical string of cartridges pointing right. Most early 0.30-'06 machine gun ammunition manufactured during World War II was belted rather than linked due to a steel shortage. All metal-linked ammunition was reserved for the Army Air Force and Naval Aviation. When the US Army Air Force .30-caliber machine gun was superseded by the .50-caliber machine gun mid-war, all .30-caliber ammunition began to be belted in M1 250-round belts for infantry use or M3 100-round woven belts for use in vehicles and tanks. Post-World War II production used linked ammunition.

In a belt with mixture of ammunition types the number and type of rounds per 5- or 10-round segment is used. If different ammunition types were used in the segment, they were alternated (for example, A–B–A–B–C rather than A–A–B–B–C), with the tracer round (C) at the end. Usually one round in five or ten was tracer, to show the gunner the trajectory; pre-War belts used a 1-in-10 mix and War and Post-War belts used a 1-in-5 mix.

T1ECT = 1,500 cartridges .30-06 M1-linked (4 × AP M2, 1xTR M1) in cartons (250-round belts), 6 cartons per metal-lined wooden chest M1917. Volume: 1.5 cubic feet.
T1EDP = 1,000 cartridges .30-06 M1917-belted or 1100 rounds .30-06 M1-linked (4 × AP M2, 1 × TR M1) in metal ammo box M1, 4 × M1 ammo boxes per wooden crate. Volume: 1.0 cubic feet.
T1EED = 250 cartridges .30-06 M1917-belted or 275 rounds .30-06 M1-linked (9 × AP M2, 1 × TR M1) in metal ammo box M1.
T1EEF = 1,200 cartridges .30-06 M1-linked (2 × AP M2, 2 × INC M1, 1 × TR M1), in cartons (100 round belt), 12 cartons per metal-lined wooden chest M1917. Gross Weight: 106 lbs. Volume: 1.5 cubic feet.
T1EGW = 250 cartridges .30-06 M1917-belted or 275 rounds .30-06 M1-linked (4 × Ball M2, 1 × TR M1) in metal ammo box M1.
T1EHC = 250 cartridges .30-06 M1917-belted or 275 rounds .30-06 M1-linked (9 × Ball M2, 1 × TR M1) in metal ammo box M1.
T1EHD = 1,500 cartridges .30-06 M1917-belted (4 × Ball M2, 1x TR M1), in cartons (250-round belt), 6 cartons per metal-lined wooden chest M1917. Gross Weight: 111 lbs. Volume: 1.5 cubic feet.
T1EHR = 480 cartridges .30-06 M1-linked (4 × Ball M2, 1 × TR M1), 120 linked rounds per carton, 2 cartons per M8 ammo can (240 rounds), 2 × M8 ammo cans per M9 wooden crate. Gross Weight: 45 lbs. Volume: 0.7 cubic feet.
T1EMB = 1,000 cartridges .30-06 M1917-belted (4 × Ball M2, 1 × TR M1), 250 belted rounds per metal M1 ammo box, 4 × M1 ammo boxes per wooden crate. Gross Weight: 93 lbs. Volume: 1.0 cubic feet.

Class T1I (Caliber .50)[edit]

There were three grades of cartridges, based on accuracy and reliability. "AC" (Aircraft) the highest, came in metal linked belts and was suitable for aircraft and Anti-Aircraft machine-guns. "MG" (Machine Gun) came in woven cloth or metal-link belts and was suitable for use in ground machine-guns. Class 3 (Unsuitable) was rejected as being under standards and was destroyed.

Cartons (1939–1948)

T1IAA = 120 cartridges .50 Armor-Piercing M2, in 10-round cartons, 6 cartons per M10 ammo can (60 rounds), 2 × M10 cans per M12 wooden crate. Volume: 0.7 cubic feet.
T1IBB = 350 cartridges .50 AP M2 in 10-round cartons, 35 Cartons per wooden chest M1917. Gross Weight: 112 lbs. Volume: 1.5 cubic feet.
T1IBS = 240 cartridges .50 AP M2 in 10-round cartons, 6 cartons per waxed cardboard box (60 rounds), 4 × waxed cardboard boxes per wooden crate. Gross Weight: 77 lbs. Volume: 1.2 cubic feet.
T1IDC = 350 cartridges .50 AP-Incendiary M8, Aircraft Grade (Grade AC), in 10-round cartons, in wooden chest M1917. Gross Weight: 110 lbs. Volume: 1.5 cubic feet.
T1IDD = 350 cartridges .50 API M8, in 10-round cartons, in wooden chest M1917. Gross Weight: 107 lbs. Volume: 1.5 cubic feet.
T1IDQ = 120 cartridges .50 API M8, in 10-round cartons, 6 cartons per M10 ammo can (60 rounds), 2 × M10 cans per M12 wooden crate. Gross Weight: 42 lbs. Volume: 0.7 cubic feet.
T1IDR = 120 cartridges .50 API M8, in 10-round cartons, 6 cartons per M10 ammo can (60 rounds), 2 × M10 cans per M12 wooden crate. Gross Weight: 42 lbs. Volume: 0.7 cubic feet.
T1IFB = 350 cartridges .50 Ball M1, in 10-round cartons, in wooden chest M1917. Volume: 1.5 cubic feet.
T1IGB = 350 cartridges .50 Ball M2, in 10-round cartons, in wooden chest M1917. Gross Weight: 109 lbs. Volume: 1.5 cubic feet.
T1IGH = 350 cartridges .50 Ball M2, in 10-round cartons, in wooden chest M1917. Gross Weight: 110 lbs. Volume: 1.5 cubic feet.
T1IGT = 120 cartridges .50 Ball M2, in 10-round cartons, 6 cartons per M10 ammo can, 2 × M10 ammo cans per M12 wooden crate. Gross Weight: 44 lbs. Volume: 0.7 cubic feet.
T1IKA = 350 cartridges .50 Incendiary M1, in 10-round cartons, in wooden chest M1917. Volume: 1.5 cubic feet.
T1IKC = 240 cartridges .50 Incendiary M1, in 10-round cartons, 12 cartons per waxed cardboard box (120 rounds), 2 × waxed cardboard boxes per T2 wooden crate (240 rounds). Gross Weight: 75 lbs. Volume: 1.12 cubic feet.
T1IPB = 350 cartridges .50 Tracer M1, in 10-round cartons, in wooden chest M1917. Volume: 1.5 cubic feet.
T1IPI = 120 cartridges .50 Tracer M1, in 10-round cartons, 6 cartons per M10 ammo can, 2 × M10 ammo cans per M12 wooden crate. Gross Weight: 43 lbs. Volume: 0.7 cubic feet.

Cartons (1948–1958)

TAIJA = 240 cartridges .50 API-Tracer M20, in 10-round cartons, 24 cartons per metal-lined wooden crate. Gross Weight: 82 lbs. Volume: 1.2 cubic feet.

Belted (1939–1948)
Note: The symbol for belted or linked 0.50-caliber BMG ammunition was a diagonal string of cartridges pointing from the lower left corner to the upper right corner. The type of ammunition was indicated by a code letter prefixed to the ammunition's Lot Number. "B" stood for Belted (woven cloth belt) and "L" stood for Linked (disintegrating metal links).
Due to a steel shortage, linked belts were originally reserved for the Army Air Force and Naval Aviation. Machine gun ammunition for ground use was supplied in 110-round M7 woven belts for infantry and 50-round woven belts for vehicles and tanks. After the Allies achieved air superiority over Europe around the fall of 1944, linked rounds began being issued to ground units.
In a belt with a mixture of ammunition types the number and type of rounds per 5- or 10-round segment is used. If different ammunition types were used in the segment, they were usually alternated (for example, A-B-A-B-C rather than A-A-B-B-C), with the tracer round (C) at the end. Usually one in five or one in ten cartridges were tracer.

T1IBA = 300 cartridges .50 linked (Ball M2).
T1IBW = 265 cartridges .50 linked (AP M2), in metal-lined wooden chest M1917. Volume: 1.5 cubic feet. Gross Weight: 100 lbs.
T1ICA = 265 cartridges .50 linked (2 × AP M2, 2 × Incendiary M1, 1 × Tracer M1), in metal-lined wooden chest M1917. Gross Weight: 106 lbs. Volume: 1.5 cubic feet.
T1ICC = 265 cartridges .50 linked (2 × AP M2, 2 × Incendiary M1, 1 × Tracer M1), in metal-lined wooden chest M1917. Gross Weight: 100 lbs. Volume: 1.5 cubic feet.
T1ICE = 265 cartridges .50 linked (4 × AP M2, 1 × Tracer M1) in metal-lined wooden chest M1917. Volume: 1.5 cubic feet.
T1ICJ = 240 cartridges .50 linked (AP M2) in 60-round cartons, in metal-lined wooden chest M1917. Gross Weight: 90 lbs. Volume: 1.5 cubic feet.
T1ICN = 220 cartridges .50 belted (2 × AP M2, 2 × INC M1, 1 × TR M1), 110 belted rounds in metal M2 ammo box, 2 × M2 ammo boxes per wooden crate. Gross Weight: 71 lbs. Volume: 0.93 Cubic Feet.
T1ICQ = 210 cartridges .50 linked (2 × AP M2, 2 × INC M1, 1 × TR M1), Aircraft (AC) grade, 105 linked rounds in metal M2 ammo box, 2 × M2 ammo boxes per wooden crate. Volume: 0.93 Cubic Feet.
T1ICR = 210 cartridges .50 linked (2 × AP M2, 2 × INC M1, 1 × TR M1), Machinegun (MG) grade, 105 linked rounds in metal M2 ammo box, 2 × M2 ammo boxes per wooden crate. Volume: 0.93 Cubic Feet.
T1ICW = 240 cartridges .50 linked (AP M2), in 60-round cartons, in metal-lined wooden chest M1917. Gross Weight: 95 lbs. Volume: 1.5 cubic feet.
T1IDH = 265 cartridges .50 linked (2 × API M8, 2 × Incendiary M1, 1 × Tracer M10), in wooden chest M1917. Volume: 1.5 cubic feet.
T1IDO = 110 cartridges .50 linked (2 × AP M2, 2 × INC M1, 1 × TR M1), 55 linked rounds in metal M10 ammo can, 2 × M10 ammo cans per M12 wooden crate. Gross Weight: 42 lbs. Volume: 0.7 cubic feet.
T1IDP = 210 cartridges .50 linked (4 × AP M2, 1 × TR M1), 105 linked rounds in metal M2 ammo box, 2 × M2 ammo boxes per wooden crate. Volume: 0.93 Cubic Feet.
T1IDS = 110 cartridges .50 linked (2 × AP-I M8, 2 × INC M1 , 1 TR M10), 55 linked rounds in metal M10 ammo can, 2 × M10 ammo cans per M12 wooden crate. Gross Weight: 44 lbs. Volume: 0.7 cubic feet.
T1IFC = 210 cartridges .50 linked (Ball M1), 105 rounds per metal ammo box M2, 2 × M2 ammo boxes per wooden crate. Volume: 0.93 Cubic Feet.
T1IFW = 210 cartridges .50 linked (4 × Ball M33, 1 × TR M17), 105 rounds per metal ammo box M2, 2 × M2 ammo boxes per wooden crate. Volume: 0.93 Cubic Feet.
T1IGD = 265 cartridges .50 linked (4 × Ball M2, 1 × TR M1), in wooden chest M1917. Volume: 1.5 cubic feet.
T1IGO = 265 cartridges .50 linked (Ball M2) in wooden chest M1917. Gross Weight: 97 lbs. Volume: 1.5 cubic feet.
T1IGR = 240 cartridges .50 linked (Ball M2), in 60-round cartons, in wooden chest M1917. Gross Weight: 93 lbs. Volume: 1.5 cubic feet.
T1IGV = 240 cartridges .50 linked (Ball M2), in 60-round cartons, in wooden chest M1917. Volume: 1.5 cubic feet.
T1IIH = 265 cartridges .50 linked (2 × API M8, 2 × Incendiary M1, 1 × Tracer M10), in wooden chest M1917. Gross Weight: 99 lbs. Volume: 1.5 cubic feet.
T1IIJ = 110 cartridges .50 linked (API M8), 55 linked rounds per carton, 1 carton per M10 ammo can, 2 × M10 ammo cans per M12 wooden crate. Gross Weight: 44 lbs. Volume: 0.7 cubic feet.
T1IIM = 110 cartridges .50 linked (4 × API M8, 1 × INC M1), 55 linked rounds per carton, 1 carton per M10 ammo can, 2 × M10 ammo cans per M12 wooden crate. Gross Weight: 44 lbs. Volume: 0.7 cubic feet.
T1IIN = 265 cartridges .50 linked (2 × API M8, 2 × Incendiary M1, 1 × API-T M20), in wooden chest M1917. Volume: 1.5 cubic feet.
T1IIT = 330 cartridges .50 linked (2 × API M8, 2 × Incendiary M1, 1 × API-T M20), in British H.151 metal transit chest. Volume: 1.6 cu. ft. Gross Weight: 130 lbs.
T1IIW = 265 cartridges .50 linked (4 × API M8, 1 × API-T M20), in wooden chest M1917. Gross Weight: 96 lbs. Volume: 1.5 cubic feet.
T1IMM = 110 cartridges .50 linked (4 × Ball M2, 1 × Tracer M1), 55 linked rounds per carton, 1 carton per M10 ammo can, 2 × M10 ammo cans per M12 wooden crate. Volume: 0.7 cubic feet.
T1IMQ = 110 cartridges .50 linked (4 × Ball M2, 1 × Tracer M17), 55 linked rounds per carton, 1 carton per M10 ammo can, 2 × M10 ammo cans per M12 wooden crate. Gross Weight: 44 lbs. Volume: 0.7 cubic feet.

Belted (1948–1958)

TAIGC = 220 cartridges .50 linked (API M8), 110 linked rounds per carton, 1 carton per M21 ammo can, 2 × M21 ammo cans per M23 wooden crate (220 rounds). Gross Weight: 83 lbs. Volume: 1.2 cubic feet.
TAIFW = 210 cartridges .50 linked (4 × Ball M33, 1 × TR M17), 105 linked rounds per carton, 2 cartons per wooden crate. Gross Weight: 80 lbs. Volume: 1.07 Cubic Feet.

Class T1J (Class T1 Defective Ammunition)[edit]

Details ammunition that was Class 3 (Unserviceable). All Unserviceable ammunition was to be destroyed but was sometimes used for training.

T1JAA = 265 cartridges .50 linked Tracer M1, Defective, in wooden chest M1917
T1JDA = 265 cartridges .50 linked 4 Defective Tracer 1 Serviceable Tracer, in wooden chest M1917 110Lbs 1.5 cu.ft (not for use for overhead fire substitute for ball ammunition)

Class T1L (Experimental Ammunition)[edit]

T1LAA = 100 cartridges .60 T32 Ball [15.2 x 114mm T17] in cartons, 10 rounds per carton, 10 cartons per wooden chest M1917. Gross Weight: ? lbs. Volume: 1.5 Cubic Feet. Designed for use with the experimental .60-caliber T17 Machine Gun, a reverse-engineered version of the German MG151 cannon chambered for an experimental .60 anti-tank rifle round.

Class T1U (Class T1 Blank Ammunition)[edit]

T1UCC = 150 linked cartridges .50 Blank T-40, in wooden crate.
T1UAK = 1480 cartridges .30-06 Blank M1909, in 5-round clips in 20-round cartons, in cardboard boxes (740 rounds), in wooden crate. Gross Weight: 67 lbs. Volume: 1.1 cubic feet.

Class T1V (Class T1 "Dummy" Ammunition)[edit]

T1VAE = 960 cartridges .30-06 Dummy M1906, in 5-round clips in 20-round cartons, 12 cartons in metal ammo can M8 (240 rounds), 4 × M8 ammo cans per wooden crate.
T1VGC = 350 cartridges .50 Dummy M2, in 10-round cartons, in wooden chest M1917. Volume: 1.5 Cubic Feet.

Sub-Group T2 (Ammunition for Revolver, Pistol and Submachinegun)[edit]

Pistol ammunition came in three grades. Grade 1 was suitable for revolvers and pistols, Grade 2 was suitable for pistols and submachine guns, and Grade 3 was Unsuitable for use.

Class T2A (.45 ACP)[edit]

Ammunition with an "S" code letter prefix to its Lot Number was made with steel cases rather than brass. This was a wartime economy measure to conserve copper and zinc. They were made entirely at the Evansville Chrysler and Evansville Chrysler Sunbeam ammunition plants in Evansville, Indiana.

T2AAA = 2,000 Cartridges, .45 ACP Ball M1911, in 20-round Cartons, 100 cartons per metal-lined M1917 Wooden Packing Box (2,000 rounds). Pre-war 20-round packaging. Gross Weight: 110 lbs. Volume: 0.92 Cubic Feet.
T2AAA = 2,000 Cartridges, .45 ACP Ball M1911, in 50-round Cartons, 40 cartons per metal-lined M1917 Wooden Packing Box (2,000 rounds). Changed to 50-round packaging in 1942 to make it quicker to distribute ammunition. Gross Weight: 107 lbs. Volume: 0.92 Cubic Feet.
T2AAD = 1,800 Cartridges, .45 ACP Ball M1911, in 50-round Cartons, 18 cartons per T1 waxed cardboard box (900 rounds), 2 × T1 boxes per T4 packing box (1800 rounds). Created in 1942 to make it easier to open and unpack ammunition. The waterproof wax coating was found to be ineffective and sea salt-air and moisture caused the steel-cased ammunition to corrode. Gross Weight: 92 lbs. Volume: 0.74 Cubic Feet.
T2AAF = 1,200 Cartridges, .45 ACP Ball M1911, in 50-round Cartons, 12 cartons per metal M5 ammo can (600 rounds), 2 × M5 ammo cans per M3 wooden crate (1200 rounds). Created in 1943 to replace the T2AAD crate. Gross Weight: 67 lbs. Volume: 0.644 Cubic Feet.
T2AAM = 1,200 Cartridges, .45 ACP Ball M1911, in 50-round Cartons, 12 cartons per metal M20 ammo can (600 rounds), 2 × M20 ammo cans per M22 wooden crate (1200 rounds). Created in 1948? to replace the T2AAF crate. Gross Weight: 68 lbs. Volume: 0.75 Cubic Feet.

Class T2B (.38 Caliber)[edit]

.38 Special was for use in Colt Commando revolvers. The Commando was issued by the US Army to Military Police and Counter-Intelligence Corps personnel. On the home front the Commando was issued to armed security guards at government facilities and factories that were either drawn from the State Guards or were deputized as "auxiliary Military Police". .38 Smith & Wesson was for use in revolvers like the Lend-Lease Smith & Wesson Victory Model and British .38/200 Enfield No. 2 and Webley Mk VI. Ammunition was civilian market production, used commercial markings (headstamp over caliber), and came in commercial packaging with colored ink printing.

T2BAA = 2,000 Cartridges, .38 Special Ball (158-grain), in 50-round cartons. 40 cartons per wooden shipping crate with tarpaper lining. Gross Weight: 73 lbs. Volume: 0.57 Cubic Feet.
T2BBA = 2,000 Cartridges, .38 Smith & Wesson Ball (70-grain), in 50-round cartons. 40 cartons per wooden shipping crate with tarpaper lining. Volume: 0.57 Cubic Feet.
T2BCA = 2,000 Cartridges, .38 Smith & Wesson Ball (146-grain), in 50-round cartons. 40 cartons per wooden shipping crate with tarpaper lining. Volume: 0.57 Cubic Feet.
T2BDA = 2,000 Cartridges, .38 Special Ball (148-grain), in 50-round cartons. 40 cartons per wooden shipping crate with tarpaper lining. Volume: 0.57 Cubic Feet.

Class T2C (9-mm Caliber)[edit]

T2CAA = 9x19mm Parabellum. wooden shipping crate with tarpaper lining.

Class T2V (Class T2 "Dummy" Ammunition)[edit]

T2VAC = 1,200 Cartridges, .45 ACP Dummy M1921, in 50-round Cartons, 12 cartons per M5 ammunition can (600 rounds), 2 × M5 ammo cans per M3 wooden crate. Volume: 0.75 Cubic Feet.

Sub-Group T3 (Shells for Shotgun)[edit]

Guard shells (No. 4 Birdshot with a brass base or partial brass case and a paper hull) were used by sentries and military police. Combat shells (00 Buckshot with a partial or full brass case) were used by frontline troops. Sporting shells (No. 6 or No. 8 Birdshot with a brass base and paper hull) were used for competition trap shooting and hunting game. Chilled shot was ammunition manufactured by dropping measured drops of hot lead from the top of a tall structure (called a "shot tower") into a tub of cold water below; it was denser and harder than regular lead shot.

Class T3A (12 Gauge 2.75" Shell)[edit]

Note = Shells were also bought in commercial 500-shell wooden packing boxes that only had the manufacturer's markings on them.
T3ABD = 675 Shells, Shotgun, 12 Gauge, No.00 Buckshot, in 25-shell cartons. 27 cartons per M1917 wooden chest. Gross Weight: 98 lbs. Volume: 1.5 cubic feet.
T3ABE = 600 Shells, Shotgun, 12 Gauge, No.00 Buckshot, in 25-shell cartons. 27 cartons per M1917 wooden chest. Gross Weight: 90 lbs. Volume: 1.5 cubic feet.
T3AGA = 500 Shells, Shotgun, 12 Gauge, No.8 Chilled Shot, in 25-shell cartons. 20 cartons per wooden packing box. Gross Weight: 56.5 lbs. Volume: 0.75 cubic feet.
T3AGD = 675 Shells, Shotgun, 12 Gauge, No.8 Chilled Shot, in 25-shell cartons. 27 cartons per M1917 wooden chest. Gross Weight: 94 lbs. Volume: 1.5 cubic feet.
T3AGE = 360 Shells, Shotgun, 12 Gauge, No.8 Chilled Shot, in 5-shell cartons. 24 cartons per M10 metal ammo can (120 shells). 3 × M10 ammo cans per M15 wooden crate. Gross Weight: 55 lbs. Volume: 0.9 Cubic Feet.
T3AUD = 240 Shells, Shotgun, 12 Gauge, No.8 Chilled Shot, Paper Cased, in 5-shell cartons. 24 cartons per M10 metal ammo can (120 shells). 2 × M10 ammo cans per M12 wooden crate.
T3AWD = 360 Shells, Shotgun, 12 Gauge, No. 4 Chilled Shot, in 10-shell cartons, 12 cartons per M10 metal ammo can (120 shells). 3 × M10 ammo cans per M15 wooden crate. Volume: 0.9 Cubic Feet.

Class T3G (.410 Gauge 3" Shell M35)[edit]

The M35 was a special .410 Bore shell with a full brass case used in compact survival weapons.

T3GAA = 450 Shells, Shotgun, .410 Gauge M35, No.6 Shot, in 25-shell cartons in waterproof envelopes, 18 cartons per wooden chest. Gross Weight: 31 lbs. Volume: 0.35 cubic feet.

Sub-Group T4 (Miscellaneous service components of small arms ammunition, and instruction material for field service account)[edit]

[icon]

This section is empty. You can help by adding to it. (March 2013)

Sub-Group T5 (Shipping and packaging containers and materials, including such items as Bandoleers, Belts, Clips, Links, and odds and ends for small arms ammunition)[edit]

[icon]

This section is empty. You can help by adding to it. (March 2013)

Sub-Group T6 (Ammunition for obsolete and non-standard small arms)[edit]

Class T6L (.300 Holland & Holland Magnum)[edit]

Used in Winchester Model 70 Bull Gun rifles for long-distance target shooting at Camp Perry matches from 1936 to 1971(?). The original British loading used cordite and had the same muzzle velocity and power as the .30-06 Springfield. American-made Match-grade ammunition was loaded with IMR powder that allowed heavier bullets and higher velocities.

T6LAA = .300 H & H Magnum Ball (180-grain) cartridges (Grade R), 20-round cartons, commercial wooden crate lined with tarpaper. Gross Weight: ? Volume: ?

8mm Lebel Rifle[edit]

8 mm Lebel Rifle = 1120 rounds, 8mm Lebel Rifle Ball, in 20-round cartons, 56 cartons per M1917 Wooden Packing Crate. Gross Weight: ? Volume: 1.5 cubic feet.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^Sledge, Eugene. With the Old Breed...
  2. ^ abHogg, Ian V. The American Arsenal, p258. Frontline Books (2014).
  3. ^TM-2942.36" Rocket Launchers M9, M9A1, and M18, p.46.
  4. ^Section VII. (Ammunition), TM 9-294: 2.36-inch A.T. Rocket Launcher M1A1. War Department, September 27, 1943.
  • War Department Ordnance Field Service Bulletin (OFSB) No. 3-14(Tentative) Ammunition Identification Code (A.I.C.), January 16, 1942.
  • War Department Ordnance Field Service Bulletin (OFSB) No. 3-14 (3rd edition)Ammunition Identification Code (A.I.C.), July 1, 1943.
  • War Department Supply Manual ORD-11SNL Group S (Bombs, Grenades and Pyrotechnics)
  • War Department Supply Manual ORD-11SNL Group T (Small Arms Ammunition)
  • Department of the Army Supply Bulletin SB 9-AMM5Ammunition Identification Code (AIC)
  • Department of the Army Supply Manual SM 9-5-1305, Stock List of Current Issue Items, Ammunition and Explosives, AMMUNITION – THROUGH 30 MILLIMETER, Federal Supply Class 1305, April 1958.
  • U.S. War Department Training Manual TM 9-1900Small-Arms Ammunition, September 1947.
  • Dept. of the Army and Air Force Training Manual TM 9-1900Ammunition, General, June 1956.
  • Dept. of the Army Training Manual TM 9-1305-200, Small Arms Ammunition, June 1961
  • Dept. of the Army Training Manual TM 9-1305-201-34P, Small Arms Ammunition to 30 mm – Direct Support & General Support Maintenance Manual, July 1981
  • Dept. of the Army Training Manual TM 9-1305-201-20P, Small Arms Ammunition to 30 mm – Organizational Maintenance Manual, Oct 1981
Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_U.S._Army_munitions_by_supply_catalog_designation

Gun Cases & Ammo Boxes

Order value
less than £5
Order value
less than £25
Order value £25 or more
Order value £100 or more
£2.99£4.49£6.99£7.49
Remote areas, Highlands and Islands of Scotland AB31-38, AB44-45, AB53-56, CA18-27, FK17-FK21, HS1-HS9, IV7, IV9-12, IV14-28, IV30-32,IV36, IV40-56, KA27-28, KW, LA15-23, PA20-38, PA41-49, PA60-78, PA80-88,PH17-26, PH30-44, PH49-50, ZE
£2.99£4.49£6.99 (Royal Mail)£7.49 (Royal Mail)£14.95 (Courier)£17.95 (Courier)
Northern Ireland, Isle of Man and Isle of Scilly
BT, IM, TR21
£2.99£4.49£6.99 (Royal Mail)£7.49 (Royal Mail)£14.95 (Courier)£17.95 (Courier)£2.99£4.49£6.99 (Royal Mail)£7.49 (Royal Mail)£15.95 (Courier)£24.95 (Courier)£3.99£4.49£7.99£9.99
Ireland, Belgium, Netherlands, Luxembourg, France, Germany, Denmark, Italy, Spain, Portugal & Greece (<5kg)†
£7.95£12.95£17.95£26.95
Rest of Europe (<5kg)†
£7.95£12.95£24.95£39.95
Rest of World (<5kg)†
£9.95£14.95£39.95£79.95
Sours: https://www.cadetdirect.com/webbing-carriage/plano-gun-cases-boxes
  1. Business model powerpoint
  2. Counter strike clean
  3. Charge fitbit versa
  4. Sugaring utah
  5. Shield roll20

Military Storage Containers

We offer military storage containers below that can be used for a variety of purposes. Whether you're looking for a waterproof storage box or a Fat 50 Ammo can, you'll find what you're looking for here.

Military Surplus Containers

Militaries need storage containers to store and transport a variety of materials, including documents, ammunition, food, and medical supplies. Since military-grade items are typically known for their durability and no-nonsense functionality, surplus military storage containers are highly sought after for civilian use and can be repurposed in a variety of ways.

Coleman's travels the globe to track down the best military surplus we can get our hands on, and this certainly includes any surplus storage containers we can find. Whether it be general purpose storage containers, ammo boxes, trunks, bins, waterproof storage containers, we take a great deal of pride in offering a wide variety of genuine surplus containers to our customers. Most of what we buy is genuine US military surplus, but we also carry European military surplus items. Browse our selection of military containers below and be sure to check back often, as new military storage products are added to our store as we acquire additional surplus.

Sours: https://colemans.com/product-category/containers/
Next Generation Squad Weapons l 6.8mm Weapons \u0026 Ammo for Army NGSW l EXCLUSIVE With Textron Systems

MILITARYCRATES.COM, a division of woodshipping crates.com, is a small business that is proud to supply shipping crates to the U.S. Navy, Army, Homeland Security and military contractors.  Our ruggedized military-grade crates are very popular due to their excellent performance under extreme conditions.

We put our experience to work for our military customers through our free design and consulting services.  Our suggestions and quality construction have improved the crates used by many customers. Sensitive equipment is now being safely delivered to our fighting men and women world-wide, under extreme conditions.

We recently won a Navy crate design and construction contest over four competitors.  Our rugged crates are now safely carrying sensitive electronic equipment to our submariners also, under extremely difficult shipping conditions.

MILITARYCRATES.COM is a proud supporter of both the USO and the Wounded Warrior Project.  For each order received, militarycrates.com makes a donation to the customer’s choice of these organizations.

We are a military family business that supports our troops by giving them the finest products possible.

To see another exciting way we support our troops, please visit the EXTREME MAKEOVER: HOME EDITION! page of this web site.

                                                                          Suzanne and Louie Maragos

                                                                         Militaryshippingcrates.com, MILITARYCRATES.COM, a division of wood shippingcrates.com

Click HERE to see our short Product & Service video.


All of our quality products are built with lumber that is ISPM 15 Heat Treatment Certified, and approved for international shipping.

                                                                     woodshippingcrates.com

Sours: http://woodshippingcrates.com/military_crates

Rifle crates military

MILITARY BOXES AND CRATES

Description

Wholesale of Soviet and Russian ammunition boxes.

We sell used army wooden boxes. You may buy military surplus ammo crates here, too. We also have army ammunition cans. The cartridge boxes we sell come from the Czech Army, yet many of the "spam cans" are of Russian origin. All crates are labelled with calibre, quantity, and manufacturing date or lot number of the ammo. 

original Soviet army ammo crate drawing

original Soviet army ammo crate drawing

All crates we sell have been stored under roof by the Army until very recently. However, not all boxes are in great condition. Mostly, they're rather designed to be used as paint-ball and air-soft decorations or geocaching containers. We ship ammo crates worldwide. Economically, provided shipping costs, it makes sense buying a palette or a whole container of boxes. All crates you can buy here are to be used as garniture, not for storing explosives. 

Standard size: 70x20x40 cm. 

There are available:

  • TNT explosive boxes
  • grenades boxes 
  • missile boxes
  • machine gun ammunition boxes
  • rocket cases
  • ammo cans
  • army utility boxes
  • cartridges
  • cardboard ammo boxes

Russian ammo box for sale

Russian ammo box for sale

 

Sours: https://mortarinvestments.eu/catalog/item/military-boxes-and-crates
Next Generation Squad Weapons l 6.8mm Weapons \u0026 Ammo for Army NGSW l EXCLUSIVE With Textron Systems

Well, his. We've had nothing for almost a month. - Natasha was sad.

Similar news:

Paola's big breasts swayed very sexually to the beat of her movements, and the girls' nipples also rubbed against each other. Then Paola felt Natalie begin to press on her with the head of her penis. In a second, this pain began to sweetly torment Paola's cock. And one more push forward, Paola barely perceptibly screamed.

This time Natalie's member did not rise up, and was right below between Paola's balls.



1442 1443 1444 1445 1446