Army reserve review

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U.S. Army Reserve Employee Reviews

Don't join for school benefits only

Sergeant (Current Employee) - TX - September 14, 2021

If you're young and want to join the reserves for school benefits, don't. Your Army commitment will get in the way, even if you schedule your classes on non-drill days (Mon-Thurs). The benefits aren't great (Montgomery GI bill), especially for University. Missing drill for classes all depends on your Commander. The only real reason to join the reserves is for citizenship, tricare or finishing the rest of your 20 years. Go do 3 or 4 years of active duty and get out with the Post 9/11 GI Bill(Full ride in college). I have seen numerous privates shocked to see their benefits aren't like what they were told. Another note, they will cut your orders before the 30 day mark so you don't qualify for BAH (Basic Allowance for Housing) aka more money in your pocket. Besides that it looks great on a resume, tons of Army schools you can attend and leadership training.

Pros

Healthcare, Citizenship, Leadership skills

Cons

School benefits, Poor planning, Not a lot of on the job training

Sours: https://www.indeed.com/cmp/U.S.-Army-Reserve/reviews

Pros & Cons of Joining the Reserve

Those considering applying to join the Reserve must weigh the pros and cons of serving as a Reservist. And it’s not as easy as simply deciding you want to serve part-time in the military rather Pros & Cons of Joining the Reservethan going for a full time career in uniform.

There are the nuances of each individual branch of service–some don’t want to join the Navy and would be happier in the Army, for example. Others may be interested in serving in one specific branch of service only. Whatever your motivations, there are things to know before making the commitment so that you make the most informed decision possible based on the pros and cons of becoming a Reservist.

The Various Branches Of The Reserve

Your options to become a reservist are as diverse as the number of military branches themselves. You can potentially join any of the following:

What do you need to do to join as a Reservist? Meeting the following basic standards is the start:

  • U.S. citizenship or resident alien status required
  • In general be between 17 and 42 years old (specific requirements will vary by branch)
  • Pass an Armed Forces physical exam
  • Pass the ASVAB or Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery
  • Meet the minimum ASVAB eligibility standard for your branch of service
  • Earn a “sufficient score” on the Armed Forces Qualification Test (AFQT)
  • Meet service-specific requirements for your chosen branch of military service
  • Be willing to commit to a specific range of service from three to eight years depending on the job, branch of service, etc.

Joining The Reserve: Circumstances Count

When talking about pros and cons of becoming a Reserve member, the first thing to enter into the “con” category? You may not be able to rely on the experiences of those you know who have joined the Reserve if your circumstances aren’t similar.

What does that mean? It’s simple, really. If you are a civilian and want to become a member of the Reserve, your experience will be much different (not worse, just different) than those who joined as “prior service” active duty or as reservists in a different branch of the military. As a “con”, this basically means that you will need to do more personal research to learn what your experiences might be like under comparable circumstances.

On the “pro” side on this subject, your Reserve recruiter can pair you with others who have a similar circumstance to yours.

Are you a recent high school graduate interested in joining the Reserve while in college? Or are you already in the work force and interested but not sure how currently employed people manage both civilian careers and military duty? Your recruiter can help you talk to those who have actually had those experiences.


Pros And Cons Of Becoming A Reservist

This is not meant to be a comprehensive list of every complaint and perk associated with joining a Reserve unit, but we will address some of the most common issues starting with the commitment you must make to become a part-time military member.

Military Service Commitment

Pro: Reservists generally serve one weekend a month and two weeks per year in peacetime. That is a reasonable commitment even if you hold a full-time career. Your commitment remains stable from year-to-year in peacetime. Reservists drill for 48 periods or units per year. That sounds like a “con” until you realize that a typical drill weekend period consists of four drill periods.

Con: During contingencies including natural disasters, combat deployments, and other special circumstances this schedule is definitely subject to change. You may be activated, deployed, placed on active duty, etc. with short notice in some cases.

Training

Pro: Military training is provided including career field training. Those looking to break into a technical field may find that Reserve experience is a good stepping stone to experience in that field.

Con: You will be required to attend basic training the same as any military recruit. After basic training you may also be offered advanced training.

Pro: All Reservists participate in annual training for two weeks per year which earns you active duty pay for the duration of the training period.

Activation to Full-Time Service

Con: You may be activated to full-time service and this may be on an individual basis or as part of a unit activation. You could serve 30 days in a unit near your hometown or up to a year supporting a mission outside of the United States. Opting out of a deployment labeled involuntary is not an option.

Benefits

Pro: You get military benefits when you serve in the Reserve. Your pay is based on your rank and time-in-service, and you get active duty pay during training periods.

There is free training to prepare you for your Reserve Component job. Reservists are offered TRICARE Reserve Select which is described by official sources as a “subsidized, fee-based health care coverage” program for reservists and their families when the military member is not on active duty.

Reservists on active duty for more than 30 days get comprehensive medical/dental care for free. Family members are offered health care coverage when the military member is activated for more than 30 days.

Con: The benefits you get tend to pale in comparison to full-time, active duty benefits in the same areas. This is a common complaint, and a fact of life in the Reserve.

Pro: There are Reserve education benefits offered via the Montgomery GI Bill Selected Reserve (SR) and there are also options for earning the Post 9/11 GI Bill which can be transferred to spouses and dependents under the right circumstances.

Con: The education benefits offered require a minimum six-year commitment.

Balancing Military And Civilian Commitments

Pro: You are only required to serve one weekend a month during peacetime, plus two weeks of training per year. This was mentioned above in the service commitment section. The pro here is that federal law requires your employer to work with you to meet your Reserve commitment and the Reserve duty in peacetime is a reasonable commitment to make.

As a reservist, any time you are called to active duty for 30 days or longer you qualify for protections under the Servicemembers’ Civil Relief Act (SCRA). These protections begin on the date active duty orders are received and in certain cases the servicemember’s dependents may be eligible.

Con: If you fail to meet your weekend duty and training obligations, you are subject to a court-martial or other disciplinary action. The protections offered to you under federal law including SCRA are not helpful if you aren’t in good standing with your duty commitment.

The con section here includes noting that SCRA protections (credit, interest rate protections, other consumer assistance) are not offered to Reserve members unless they are activated for 30 days or more. The common complaint that active duty troops have it better, while not always applicable or relevant, is definitely a factor in this particular area.

Joining The Reserve As An Extension Of An Existing Military Career

Pro: As a prior-service Reservist you can begin a new civilian career and quit worrying about full time duty commitments.

Con: You can still be activated for full-time duty when required and be deployed overseas if required.

Pro: Prior-service Reservists who switch from active duty to reserve duty before reaching enough years to qualify for military retirement can still earn your retirement pay in the reserve branch of your choice. You won’t give up your retirement and you aren’t required to serve 24/7.

Con: You have to wait until age 60 at a minimum to draw your retirement pay in most cases, unlike those who hit a 20-year retirement on active duty. Those troops get their retirement pay right away. Reservists must meet specific criteria when they are transferring from active service to the Reserve in order to qualify for retirement pay:

  • Be at least 60 years old (some may qualify to retire at age 50 depending on circumstances)
  • Have at least 20 years of qualifying service
  • Must have performed the last six to eight years of qualifying service while a member of the Active Reserve depending on circumstances in most cases
  • The Reservist must not “be entitled, under any other provision of law, to retired pay from an armed force or retainer pay as a member of the Fleet Reserve or the Fleet Marine Corps Reserve”

About The AuthorJoe Wallace is a 13-year veteran of the United States Air Force and a former reporter for Air Force Television News


Filed Under: Resources

Sours: https://militarybenefits.info/pros-cons-reserve/
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On average, employees at United States Army Reserve give their company a 4.2 rating out of 5.0 - which is 7% higher than the average rating for all companies on CareerBliss. The happiest United States Army Reserve employees are Sergeants submitting an average rating of 4.7.

(based on 40United States Army Reserve Review Ratings)

Ratings by Category

United States Army Reserve Employee

"It was a great opportunity to serve my nation and gain practical experience. If you can adapt, the Army Reserve will be as good an experience as you are willing to make."

Person You Work For 4 / 5 People You Work With 4 / 5 Work Setting 3 / 5
Support You Get 4 / 5 Rewards You Receive 5 / 5 Growth Opportunities 4 / 5
Company Culture 4 / 5 Way You Work 4 / 5
Financial Management Specialist

"Everything good, no complaints"

Person You Work For 5 / 5 People You Work With 5 / 5 Work Setting 5 / 5
Support You Get 5 / 5 Rewards You Receive 5 / 5 Growth Opportunities 5 / 5
Company Culture 5 / 5 Way You Work 5 / 5

Company-Industry Rating Comparison

4.2
United States Army Reserve (67)
4.8Highest Rated in this Industry is Kenco (6)
3.5Average of All Companies in this Industry (1,147)
Quartermaster

"I’ve worked in the Reserves since September of 2019. I was previously in the national guard for two years before that. I love the army and what it has to offer but want to pursue a civilian career."

Person You Work For 5 / 5 People You Work With 4 / 5 Work Setting 4 / 5
Support You Get 4 / 5 Rewards You Receive 3 / 5 Growth Opportunities 5 / 5
Company Culture 4 / 5 Way You Work 4 / 5
General Manager

"None. Each company is different with the Army and the Army constantly moves people around."

Person You Work For 4 / 5 People You Work With 4 / 5 Work Setting 3 / 5
Support You Get 3 / 5 Rewards You Receive 4 / 5 Growth Opportunities 3 / 5
Company Culture 3 / 5 Way You Work 5 / 5
United States Army Reserve Employee

"Cadets have few defined responsibilities and are often left to find their own work."

Person You Work For 3 / 5 People You Work With 2 / 5 Work Setting 2 / 5
Support You Get 2 / 5 Rewards You Receive 3 / 5 Growth Opportunities 5 / 5
Company Culture 4 / 5 Way You Work 4 / 5
United States Army Reserve Employee

"The 361st engineering company is a bridging unit, responsible for bridging gaps for the maneuver commander and ensure unlimited mobility. It is a very unique training that I am glad to experience."

Person You Work For 5 / 5 People You Work With 5 / 5 Work Setting 5 / 5
Support You Get 5 / 5 Rewards You Receive 5 / 5 Growth Opportunities 5 / 5
Company Culture 4 / 5 Way You Work 5 / 5
Financial Management Specialist

"my job is through being the army."

Person You Work For 5 / 5 People You Work With 5 / 5 Work Setting 5 / 5
Support You Get 5 / 5 Rewards You Receive 5 / 5 Growth Opportunities 5 / 5
Company Culture 5 / 5 Way You Work 5 / 5
United States Army Reserve Employee

"Great stepping stone towards your future college degree and career"

Person You Work For 5 / 5 People You Work With 5 / 5 Work Setting 5 / 5
Support You Get 5 / 5 Rewards You Receive 5 / 5 Growth Opportunities 5 / 5
Company Culture 5 / 5 Way You Work 5 / 5
United States Army Reserve Employee

"A great place to grow and build motivation."

Person You Work For 5 / 5 People You Work With 5 / 5 Work Setting 5 / 5
Support You Get 5 / 5 Rewards You Receive 5 / 5 Growth Opportunities 5 / 5
Company Culture 5 / 5 Way You Work 5 / 5
Information Systems Manager

"I have worked for the United States Army for 11+ years. No other job has afforded me the opportunity to travel around the world, interact with other cultures and train with other militaries. I have also been given great opportunities to learn special skills and work my way up the ladder. You advance only as far as you are willing to work for ever increasing positions of responsibility. I would definitely do it again if I had the chance and I hope others will continue to take advantage of all of the challenges and rewards that come with being a soldier within the U.S. Army."

Person You Work For 5 / 5 People You Work With 5 / 5 Work Setting 5 / 5
Support You Get 4 / 5 Rewards You Receive 5 / 5 Growth Opportunities 5 / 5
Company Culture 5 / 5 Way You Work 5 / 5
Administration Officer

"Service in the U.S. Army Reserve has been a challenging and rewarding experience. I have had the opportunity to represent my country overseas and serve the people of the United States. I have grown as a leader and as a person with the tools and the opportunities that have been provided to me during my service in the U.S. Army Reserve."

Person You Work For 5 / 5 People You Work With 4 / 5 Work Setting 3 / 5
Support You Get 3 / 5 Rewards You Receive 3 / 5 Growth Opportunities 4 / 5
Company Culture 4 / 5 Way You Work 4 / 5
United States Army Reserve Employee

"I love my job. It's honorable and fulfilling."

Person You Work For 4 / 5 People You Work With 4 / 5 Work Setting 3 / 5
Support You Get 3 / 5 Rewards You Receive 3 / 5 Growth Opportunities 3 / 5
Company Culture 4 / 5 Way You Work 5 / 5
Light Wheel Vehicle Mechanic

"I am an American Soldier. I am a warrior and a member of a team. I serve the people of the United States, and live the army values. I will always place the mission first. I will never accept defeat. I will never quit. I will never leave a fallen comrade. I am disciplined, physically and mentally tough, trained and proficient in my warrior tasks and drills. I will always maintain my arms, my equipment, and myself. I am an expert and a professional. I stand ready to deploy, engage and DESTROY the enemies of the United States in close combat. I am a guardian of freedom and the American way of life. I AM AN AMERICAN SOLDIER. HOOAH!!!"

Person You Work For 5 / 5 People You Work With 5 / 5 Work Setting 4 / 5
Support You Get 3 / 5 Rewards You Receive 5 / 5 Growth Opportunities 4 / 5
Company Culture 5 / 5 Way You Work 4 / 5
Squad Leader

"Joining the army is the greatest experience in my whole life."

Person You Work For 5 / 5 People You Work With 4 / 5 Work Setting 5 / 5
Support You Get 4 / 5 Rewards You Receive 5 / 5 Growth Opportunities 5 / 5
Company Culture 5 / 5 Way You Work 4 / 5
IT Specialist

"Very disciplined, organized and great workplace for anyone looking at many different careers."

Person You Work For 4 / 5 People You Work With 4 / 5 Work Setting 3 / 5
Support You Get 4 / 5 Rewards You Receive 4 / 5 Growth Opportunities 4 / 5
Company Culture 3 / 5 Way You Work 4 / 5
Sours: https://www.careerbliss.com/united-states-army-reserve/reviews/
Is THIS The Future Of Army Reserve Training?

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Reserve review army

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What does being an Army reserve mean?

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