Short a passages

Short a passages DEFAULT

Reading Short Vowel Words with Fluency Passages

I’ve mentioned this before, and I am sure I will mention it a million times again, I absolutely LOVE teaching reading! I love giving my students the tools to “drive the vehicle” and letting them go at it. We’ve been working hard on our reading fluency while reading short vowel CVC words and my students are ROCKSTARS! Honestly, the best readers I have had in my whole teaching career! Now I’m sure it’s just the group of students I have this year, but I’m also going to take just a little bit of credit 😉

My students have been loving working on their reading fluency using our sight word sentences so I knew I needed to create a similar activity that reinforces the short vowel words we are learning and focus on reading fluency passages.  These short vowel reading fluency passages have been a huge hit!

reading fluency passages

Fluency practice is such an important way to help emerging readers with their reading so let’s talk a little about what it means! Fluency is defined as the ability to read with speed, accuracy, and proper expression. Reading fluently simply means reading like you talk. When you speak, you don’t sound out each word before you say it, your speech flows. That’s exactly what reading fluency is. Being able to read so that the text flows easily.

Teaching your students to read fluently just takes practice! You can make it fun by using tools to help make the practice less monotonous. My students love using little googly eye rings on their fingers as they point to the text we are working on. It is engaging and fun! We also have used witch fingers from Halloween, colorful drink stirrers as reading wands, highlighter sticks, and magnifying glasses.

I also think it is important to have a specific focus skill when practicing fluency. Using word families words is a great way to increase reading fluency. Word families all have the same rime (ending sounds) so my students only need to focus on the beginning sound that changes.

Each page of my reading fluency passages focuses on a specific word family. The kiddos first practice reading the words in isolation. We always talk a lot before we read 😉 I ask my students what they notice about the words to help them see that they are all part of the same word family. Then we talk about how we only have to change the beginning sound in each word as we read them. I like to write the words up on the whiteboard too, saying the word aloud and having my students help me sound it out as I write. We first read from the board, then we touch and read each word on our page, making sure we “read like we talk” rather than sounding out each word.

After we read each word, I have my students find the word family words in the story. We use yellow crayons {or highlighters if we’re feeling extra frisky ;)} to highlight the words in the story. This helps us to see each word family word as we read which helps us to be successful readers. I also have my students “frame” or put a window around other words that might trick them before we read. In this passage, I would have them frame the sight word “here” as well as “and” since those prove to be tricky for my littler learners. Pre-reading is a super important skill to build reading fluency!
reading fluency passages
After we do our pre-reading strategies, we read the whole story together as a group. We make sure to touch each word as we read so we can keep track and stay focused. After we read the story a few times {depending on how much support is needed} I have my students read the story silently to themselves. This is probably my most favorite part about reading groups. I love watching the kiddos mouth the words…they look so grown up! After they read to themselves, they choose their favorite sentence from the story {usually the funniest one ;)} and rewrite it on the line. This is good writing practice, but mostly, I just have them do this so I can listen to my students read to me one-on-one as the others are working. This gives me the chance to really offer support to my students that are not quite grabbing on yet.
reading fluency passages
I have my students take their reading fluency passages home and read them to someone at home. Someone can be their dog, or stuffed animal if an adult or older sibling is busy.
For repeated practice, you can stick all the reading fluency passages in sheet protectors and put them in a binder. Then have your students do all their pre-reading strategies with a dry-erase marker and erase their page when they’re done. This way they can read the passages more than once, helping them become even more fluent readers!
Want to try these in your classroom? You can grab my FREE reading fluency passages in my shop! It includes 9 reading passages for short vowels, long vowels, and blends & digraphs.
free reading fluency passages
Find these resources in my shop:

At the end of each section, I also created a mixed vowel reading passage and corresponding assessment sheet. This is to help me see if my students are able to decode the words and sight words and figure out what they still need help with.
https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/I-Can-Read-short-vowel-intervention-fluency-passages-1786235
My students also LOVE the “dice game” as they call it. They could honestly play this all day long if I let them! We usually play this the last few minutes of reading groups. The kids roll take turns rolling the dice and reading the corresponding words as fluently as they can.
https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Fluency-Families-short-vowel-BUNDLE-1525741
I print out and add a new word family page after we learn a new short vowel. I put it in a sheet protector and add the new page to the binder. I show my students the new page, but I let them choose which page they want to read when it’s their turn. They always like to choose the “hard” page…the new one I added, so it all works out 😉
I created these adorable and effective Read & Reveal cards for my most struggling readers who just look at a word and guess a bunch of sounds 😉 I found myself repeating “touch each letter, say each sound, now blend it together” over and over again, so I knew it was crucial to create a visual for them as well. You can read more about these here.
https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Read-and-Reveal-BUNDLE-pack-1723096https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Read-and-Reveal-BUNDLE-pack-1723096
https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Read-and-Reveal-BUNDLE-pack-1723096

CVC Words, Reading, Fluency Practice, Guided Reading

Sours: https://misskindergarten.com/reading-fluency-passages/

What I Have Learned

These Short Vowel Phonics Passages are designed for students who have not yet mastered short vowel reading. They are longer texts with more sight words and story words for older students who need more practice with short vowels.

Phonics reading passages for short vowels provide extra practice for first grade and second-grade. There are 5 passages for each short vowel, word lists, and comprehension questions. Each set of passages for one vowel is about one group of kids that all live on the same street. The kids are repeated in each of the five stories to build continuity and to create a chapter book for each vowel. Even your lowest readers can feel successful reading longer text with these controlled passages.

Who is this resource designed for?

These Phonics Passages for Short Vowels are designed for students who need more practice with short vowels. They can be used for second grade RtI groups or first grade students who have already had exposure to short vowels and need more practice for mastery.

The passages are also great for English learners or older students who are reading below grade level.

Phonics reading passages for short vowels provide extra practice for first grade and second-grade. There are 5 passages for each short vowel, word lists, and comprehension questions. Each set of passages for one vowel is about one group of kids that all live on the same street. The kids are repeated in each of the five stories to build continuity and to create a chapter book for each vowel. Even your lowest readers can feel successful reading longer text with these controlled passages.

How are the Reading Passages Designed?

These reading passages are designed so that older students can practice basic phonics patterns without feeling the context or text complexity is too babyish. The passages are longer, in paragraphs, and can be compiled into a booklet or chapter book format.

A continuous story

There are five passages for each of the five short vowels for a total of 25 passages. Each set of passages for one vowel (5) is about one group of kids that all live on the same street. There are the:

  • Apple Avenue Kids
  • Emerald Way Kids
  • Iguana Drive Kids
  • Otter Lane Kids
  • Upside Down Road Kids
Phonics reading passages for short vowels provide extra practice for first grade and second-grade. There are 5 passages for each short vowel, word lists, and comprehension questions. Each set of passages for one vowel is about one group of kids that all live on the same street. The kids are repeated in each of the five stories to build continuity and to create a chapter book for each vowel. Even your lowest readers can feel successful reading longer text with these controlled passages.

The kids are repeated in each of the five stories to build continuity and to create a chapter book for each vowel. You can combine the entire set of stories to create a large chapter book, too!

Even your lowest readers can feel successful reading longer text with these controlled passages!

Phonics reading passages for short vowels provide extra practice for first grade and second-grade. There are 5 passages for each short vowel, word lists, and comprehension questions. Each set of passages for one vowel is about one group of kids that all live on the same street. The kids are repeated in each of the five stories to build continuity and to create a chapter book for each vowel. Even your lowest readers can feel successful reading longer text with these controlled passages.

Three Word Lists

There are three word lists in two different formats. One set of words are the sound out words. These words are phonics-based and are specific to each short vowel.

Phonics reading passages for short vowels provide extra practice for first grade and second-grade. There are 5 passages for each short vowel, word lists, and comprehension questions. Each set of passages for one vowel is about one group of kids that all live on the same street. The kids are repeated in each of the five stories to build continuity and to create a chapter book for each vowel. Even your lowest readers can feel successful reading longer text with these controlled passages.

The other two sets of words students should experience before reading the story. One set of words is sight words. These are general first grade and second grade sight words. The third set of words is story words. These are more complex words that help give the story context and meaning. Most of the story words repeat throughout the stories.

Phonics reading passages for short vowels provide extra practice for first grade and second-grade. There are 5 passages for each short vowel, word lists, and comprehension questions. Each set of passages for one vowel is about one group of kids that all live on the same street. The kids are repeated in each of the five stories to build continuity and to create a chapter book for each vowel. Even your lowest readers can feel successful reading longer text with these controlled passages.

The short vowel words include words with blends, digraphs and consonant clusters. Most of the sound out words are single-syllable.

The word lists are available in two formats. One format is a list on the side of each reading passage. This list can be cut out and glued into a notebook or kept attached to the page.

Phonics reading passages for short vowels provide extra practice for first grade and second-grade. There are 5 passages for each short vowel, word lists, and comprehension questions. Each set of passages for one vowel is about one group of kids that all live on the same street. The kids are repeated in each of the five stories to build continuity and to create a chapter book for each vowel. Even your lowest readers can feel successful reading longer text with these controlled passages.

The second format is word cards. The word cards can be cut apart and used as flashcards. Also included is an interactive notebook pocket where students can store their word cards for each story.

What is included with these Phonics Passages?

The Phonics Passages includes 25 reading passages, word lists for phonics words, sight words, and story words, and comprehension questions

Included in the Short Vowel Reading Passages are:

  • Five passages for each of the five short vowels for a total of 25 passages
  • Word Lists for each passage separated into sound out words, sight words, and story words
  • Word cards for each story with interactive notebook pockets. Pockets are provided for each short vowel and story for flexible grouping.
  • Comprehension questions for each story.
  • Cover page and Table of Contents for each short vowel to create a booklet for students to keep in their book boxes.
  • Suggestions on how to extend learning and use the passages for Interactive Notebooks.

Engaging Texts for Older Readers

While the texts focus on short vowels, we have intentionally made them longer and more complex to engage older readers. Many older students need more on-level practice with controlled text.

Here are a few samples of the texts.

Phonics reading passages for short vowels provide extra practice for first grade and second-grade. There are 5 passages for each short vowel, word lists, and comprehension questions. Each set of passages for one vowel is about one group of kids that all live on the same street. The kids are repeated in each of the five stories to build continuity and to create a chapter book for each vowel. Even your lowest readers can feel successful reading longer text with these controlled passages.
Phonics reading passages for short vowels provide extra practice for first grade and second-grade. There are 5 passages for each short vowel, word lists, and comprehension questions. Each set of passages for one vowel is about one group of kids that all live on the same street. The kids are repeated in each of the five stories to build continuity and to create a chapter book for each vowel. Even your lowest readers can feel successful reading longer text with these controlled passages.
Phonics reading passages for short vowels provide extra practice for first grade and second-grade. There are 5 passages for each short vowel, word lists, and comprehension questions. Each set of passages for one vowel is about one group of kids that all live on the same street. The kids are repeated in each of the five stories to build continuity and to create a chapter book for each vowel. Even your lowest readers can feel successful reading longer text with these controlled passages.
Phonics reading passages for short vowels provide extra practice for first grade and second-grade. There are 5 passages for each short vowel, word lists, and comprehension questions. Each set of passages for one vowel is about one group of kids that all live on the same street. The kids are repeated in each of the five stories to build continuity and to create a chapter book for each vowel. Even your lowest readers can feel successful reading longer text with these controlled passages.

Comprehension Questions

Each reading passage comes with three comprehension questions. Students refer back to the text to answer the questions and extend their learning. While we have provided comprehension questions for each passage, the intention of the resource is to build fluency with short vowels.

Phonics reading passages for short vowels provide extra practice for first grade and second-grade. There are 5 passages for each short vowel, word lists, and comprehension questions. Each set of passages for one vowel is about one group of kids that all live on the same street. The kids are repeated in each of the five stories to build continuity and to create a chapter book for each vowel. Even your lowest readers can feel successful reading longer text with these controlled passages.

How to Purchase the Phonics Reading Passages

You can purchase the Phonics Reading Passages on my website or on Teachers Pay Teachers.

Phonics Passages for Short Vowels

Filed Under: Early Reading, Grade 1, KindergartenTagged With: early reading

Sours: https://www.whatihavelearnedteaching.com/phonics-passages-for-short-vowels/
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Free decodable passages for short a CVC words

So.

These days I’ve been doing a lot of research into how our brains learn to read.

In doing that, I’ve made a shift in how approach beginning reading.

I used to ascribe to the three-cueing-systems model. It’s the idea that kids solve unfamiliar words by using three cues: what looks right (phonics), what sounds right (syntax) and what makes sense (semantics).

Here’s the problem with the three-cueing approach.

Researchers are telling us that for kids to read and remember words, they need to connect the sounds of the letters to the words on the page.  When we bypass that (by first encouraging kids to use picture or context clues), we’re actually preventing them from doing this important work.

(That important work is called orthographic mapping, but we’ll save that for another post!)

To be clear, kids might USE picture and context as their first go-to when they approach words, but this isn’t how we should TEACH them to approach words. We want to put their attention directly on the words themselves.

This means that as I’m teaching my youngest to read (he just turned five), we’re focusing much more on decodable books than on the sight word and leveled books I used with his older siblings.

(Want to follow me on my science of reading journey? This podcast episode will get you started.)

Here’s what’s hard about this phonics-first approach.

It feels slow. Painfully slow.

When kids read predictable text and leveled books, they read very quickly and fluently. That’s because they memorize the pattern and then use the picture to fill in the last word. Technically, they’re not really reading at all.

But it feels like they are. And it looks like they’re making fast progress. (Until you ask them to read those words without the picture clues and predictable text.)

So how do we make the shift to more decodable text for beginning readers? Especially when it feels so slow.

Well, the first thing to remember is that we build up to sentences, books, and passages.

My little guy is in preschool. He has been reading CVC words for a couple of months now. About a month ago we started reading decodable books (Flyleaf are our absolute favorite so far), and now I’m starting to do passages with him.

Here’s the thing about decodable passages.

They’re work.

You need to expect that they’re going to be work, and that it’s okay. But you don’t want to overwhelm beginning readers.

Here’s a video of my little guy’s first try at reading one of these passages.

To build fluency with decoding, he’ll need to reread this passage. But one reading was enough for the first time!

Here’s the “why” behind the passages:

  • The top of each passage includes three words to sound out. The dots and arrows provide guidance for blending practice.
  • Each story is just a few lines on purpose. Trust me, this will feel plenty long to new readers who have to sound out nearly every word!
  • I do include words that are either temporarily or permanently phonically irregular. In other words, the reader may not be ready (or able) to sound them out. This is intentional. It keeps the texts readable and allows them to sound the way we speak.
  • The comprehension question encourages the reader to think about what s/he just read.
  • The spelling exercise at the bottom is important! It helps kids with the process of orthographic mapping: making these words a permanent part of their sight word vocabulary.

Get the full set of passages!

Decodable Passages: CVC Words

You’ll get all 23 short vowel passages in this inexpensive bundle.

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Filed Under: Phonics, CVC Words, Science of readingTagged With: first grade, kindergarten, Pre-K

Sours: https://www.themeasuredmom.com/free-decodable-passages-for-short-a-cvc-words/
READING COMPREHENSION for CHILDREN -----Exercise 2----- Read Short Story

That's what it means when they say, a real trakhodrom. " I thought. Suddenly my tempter entered the room.

A passages short

Lena began to kiss my feet, approaching my pussy with her tender kisses. When her lips were on my pussy, I moaned gently and took her head with one hand. Lena gently touched my clitoris with her tongue, gently drove them over my lips.

(Reading Practice (Improve your pronunciation in English

I pulled out her "toy" and said: "I'm going for a condom, and you shave your pussy for now," I brought her. Foam and a razor and went for a condom. Arriving, I saw how my grandmother had shaved off almost everything, I waited a minute and came up, Well, let me see, I said. I ran my fingers over her pussy, she was all so smooth and clean.

Now discussing:

Although I was no longer twenty-five years old, any young girl would have envied my forms, an elastic juicy ass always. Attracted men, and a fourth-size breast could lift any male organ in one second. My job was very boring in one of the ordinary and gray offices, and the worst thing in it was, almost a hundred percent female team. And so sometimes I wanted to have a handsome and pumped-up colleague sitting next to you, with a very large dick in panties.



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