Aws snapshot restore

Aws snapshot restore DEFAULT

Amazon EBS fast snapshot restore

Amazon EBS fast snapshot restore enables you to create a volume from a snapshot that is fully initialized at creation. This eliminates the latency of I/O operations on a block when it is accessed for the first time. Volumes that are created using fast snapshot restore instantly deliver all of their provisioned performance.

To get started, enable fast snapshot restore for specific snapshots in specific Availability Zones. Each snapshot and Availability Zone pair refers to one fast snapshot restore. When you create a volume from one of these snapshots in one of its enabled Availability Zones, the volume is restored using fast snapshot restore.

Fast snapshot restore must be explicitly enabled on a per-snapshot basis. If you create a new snapshot from a volume that was restored from a fast snapshot restore-enabled snapshot, the new snapshot is not automatically enabled for fast snapshot restore. You must explicitly enable it for the new snapshot.

You can enable fast snapshot restore for snapshots that you own and for public and private snapshots that are shared with you.

Fast snapshot restore quotas

You can enable up to 50 snapshots for fast snapshot restore per Region. The quota applies to snapshots that you own and snapshots that are shared with you. If you enable fast snapshot restore for a snapshot that is shared with you, it counts towards your fast snapshot restore quota. It does not count towards the snapshot owner's fast snapshot restore quota.

Fast snapshot restore states

After you enable fast snapshot restore for a snapshot, it can be in one of the following states.

  • — A request was made to enable fast snapshot restore.

  • — Fast snapshot restore is being enabled. It takes 60 minutes per TiB to optimize a snapshot. Snapshots in this state offer some performance benefit when restoring volumes.

  • — Fast snapshot restore is enabled. Snapshots in this state offer the full performance benefit when restoring volumes.

  • — A request was made to disable fast snapshot restore, or a request to enable fast snapshot restore failed.

  • — Fast snapshot restore is disabled. You can enable fast snapshot restore again as needed.

Volume creation credits

The number of volumes that receive the full performance benefit of fast snapshot restore is determined by the volume creation credits for the snapshot. There is one credit bucket per snapshot per Availability Zone. Each volume that you create from a snapshot with fast snapshot restore enabled consumes one credit from the credit bucket. If you create a volume but there is less than one credit in the bucket, the volume is created without benefit of fast snapshot restore.

When you enable fast snapshot restore for a snapshot that is shared with you, you get a separate credit bucket for the shared snapshot in your account. If you create volumes from the shared snapshot, the credits are consumed from your credit bucket; they are not consumed from the snapshot owner's credit bucket.

The size of a credit bucket depends on the size of the snapshot, not the size of the volumes created from the snapshot. The size of the credit bucket for each snapshot is calculated as follows:

As you consume credits, the credit bucket is refilled over time. The refill rate for each credit bucket is calculated as follows:

For example, if you enable fast snapshot restore for a snapshot with a size of 100 GiB, the maximum size of its credit bucket is 10 credits and the refill rate is 10 credits per hour. When the credit bucket is full, you can create 10 initialized volumes from this snapshot simultaneously.

You can use Cloudwatch metrics to monitor the size of your credit buckets and the number of credits available in each bucket. For more information, see Fast snapshot restore metrics.

After you create a volume from a snapshot with fast snapshot restore enabled, you can describe the volume using describe-volumes and check the field in the output to determine whether the volume was created as an initialized volume using fast snapshot restore.

Manage fast snapshot restore

Fast snapshot restore is disabled for a snapshot by default. You can enable or disable fast snapshot restore for snapshots that you own and for snapshots that are shared with you. When you enable or disable fast snapshot restore for a snapshot, the changes apply to your account only.

Note

When you enable fast snapshot restore for a snapshot, your account is billed for each minute that fast snapshot restore is enabled in a particular Availability Zone. Charges are pro-rated and have a minimum of one hour.

When you delete a snapshot that you own, fast snapshot restore is automatically disabled for that snapshot in your account. If you enabled fast snapshot restore for a snapshot that is shared with you, and the snapshot owner deletes or unshares it, fast snapshot restore is automatically disabled for the shared snapshot in your account.

If you enabled fast snapshot restore for a snapshot that is shared with you, and it's encrypted using a custom CMK, fast snapshot restore is not automatically disabled for the snapshot when the snapshot owner revokes your access to the custom CMK. You must manually disable fast snapshot restore for that snapshot.

Use the following procedure to enable or disable fast snapshot restore for a snapshot that you own or for a snapshot that is shared with you.

To enable or disable fast snapshot restore

  1. Open the Amazon EC2 console at https://console.aws.amazon.com/ec2/.

  2. In the navigation pane, choose Snapshots.

  3. Select the snapshot.

  4. Choose Actions, Manage Fast Snapshot Restore.

  5. Select or deselect Availability Zones, and then choose Save.

  6. To track the state of fast snapshot restore as it is enabled, see Fast Snapshot Restore on the Description tab.

Note

After you enable fast snapshot restore for a snapshot, it enters the state. Snapshots that are in the state provide some performance benefits when using them to restore volumes. They start to provide the full performance benefits of fast snapshot restore only after they enter the state.

To manage fast snapshot restore using the AWS CLI

View snapshots with fast snapshot restore enabled

Use the following procedure to view the state of fast snapshot restore for a snapshot that you own or for a snapshot that is shared with you.

To view the state of fast snapshot restore using the console

  1. Open the Amazon EC2 console at https://console.aws.amazon.com/ec2/.

  2. In the navigation pane, choose Snapshots.

  3. Select the snapshot.

  4. On the Description tab, see Fast Snapshot Restore, which indicates the state of fast snapshot restore. For example, it might show a state of "2 Availability Zones optimizing" or "2 Availability Zones enabled".

To view snapshots with fast snapshot restore enabled using the AWS CLI

Use the describe-fast-snapshot-restores command to describe the snapshots that are enabled for fast snapshot restore.

The following is example output.

View volumes restored using fast snapshot restore

When you create a volume from a snapshot that is enabled for fast snapshot restore in the Availability Zone for the volume, it is restored using fast snapshot restore.

Use the describe-volumes command to view volumes that were created from a snapshot that is enabled for fast snapshot restore.

The following is example output.

Monitor fast snapshot restore

Amazon EBS emits Amazon CloudWatch events when the fast snapshot restore state for a snapshot changes. For more information, see EBS fast snapshot restore events.

Pricing and Billing

You are billed for each minute that fast snapshot restore is enabled for a snapshot in a particular Availability Zone. Charges are pro-rated with a minimum of one hour.

For example, if you enable fast snapshot restore for one snapshot in for one month (30 days), you are billed $540 ( snapshot x AZ x hours x per hour). If you enable fast snapshot restore for two snapshots in , , and for the same period, you are billed $3240 ( snapshots x AZs x hours x per hour).

If you enable fast snapshot restore for a public or private snapshot that is shared with you, your account is billed; the snapshot owner is not billed. When a snapshot that is shared with you is deleted or unshared by the snapshot owner, fast snapshot restore is disabled for the snapshot in your account and billing is stopped.

For more information, see Amazon EBS pricing.

Sours: https://docs.aws.amazon.com/AWSEC2/latest/UserGuide/ebs-fast-snapshot-restore.html

New – Amazon EBS Fast Snapshot Restore (FSR)

Amazon Elastic Block Store (EBS) has been around for more than a decade and is a fundamental AWS building block. You can use it to create persistent storage volumes that can store up to 16 TiB and supply up to 64,000 IOPS (Input/Output Operations per Second). You can choose between four types of volumes, making the choice that best addresses your data transfer throughput, IOPS, and pricing requirements. If your requirements change, you can modify the type of a volume, expand it, or change the performance while the volume remains online and active. EBS snapshots allow you to capture the state of a volume for backup, disaster recovery, and other purposes. Once created, a snapshot can be used to create a fresh EBS volume. Snapshots are stored in Amazon Simple Storage Service (Amazon S3) for high durability.

Our ever-creative customers are using EBS snapshots in many interesting ways. In addition to the backup and disaster recovery use cases that I just mentioned, they are using snapshots to quickly create analytical or test environments using data drawn from production, and to support Virtual Desktop Interface (VDI) environments. As you probably know, the AMIs (Amazon Machine Images), that you use to launch EC2 instances are also stored as one or more snapshots.

Fast Snapshot Restore
Today we are launching Fast Snapshot Restore (FSR) for EBS. You can enable it for new and existing snapshots on a per-AZ (Availability Zone) basis, and then create new EBS volumes that deliver their maximum performance and do not need to be initialized.

This performance enhancement will allow you to build AWS-based systems that are even faster and more responsive than before. Faster boot times will speed up your VDI environments and allow your Auto Scaling Groups to come online and start processing traffic more quickly, even if you use large and/or custom AMIs. I am sure that you will soon dream up new applications that can take advantage of this new level of speed and predictability.

Fast Snapshot Restore can be enabled on a snapshot even while the snapshot is being created. If you create nightly backup snapshots, enabling them for FSR will allow you to do fast restores the following day regardless of the size of the volume or the snapshot.

Enabling & Using Fast Snapshot Restore
I can get started in minutes! I open the EC2 Console and find the first snapshot that I want to set up for fast restore:

I select the snapshot and choose Manage Fast Snapshot Restore from the Actions menu:

Then I select the Availability Zones where I plan to create EBS volumes, and click Save:

After the settings are saved, I receive a confirmation:

The console shows me that my snapshot is being enabled for Fast Snapshot Restore:

The status progresses from enabling to optimizing, and then to enabled. Behind the scenes and with no extra effort on my part, the optimization process provisions extra resources to deliver the fast restores, proceeding at a rate of one TiB per hour. By contrast, non-optimized volumes retrieve data directly from the S3-stored snapshot on an incremental, on-demand basis.

Once the optimization is complete, I can create volumes from the snapshot in the usual way, confident that they will be ready in seconds and pre-initialized for full performance! Each FSR-enabled snapshot supports creation of up to 10 initialized volumes per hour per Availability Zone; additional volume creations will be non-initialized. As my needs change, I can enable Fast Snapshot Restore in additional Availability Zones and I can disable it in Zones where I had previously enabled it.

When Fast Snapshot Restore is enabled for a snapshot in a particular Availability Zone, a bucket-based credit system governs the acceleration process. Creating a volume consumes a credit; the credits refill over time, and the maximum number of credits is a function of the FSR-enabled snapshot size. Here are some guidelines:

  • A 100 GiB FSR-enabled snapshot will have a maximum credit balance of 10, and a fill rate of 10 credits per hour.
  • A 4 TiB FSR-enabled snapshot will have a maximum credit balance of 1, and a fill rate of 1 credit every 4 hours.

In other words, you can do 1 TiB of restores per hour for a given FSR-enabled snapshot within an AZ.

Things to Know
Here are some things to know about Fast Snapshot Restore:

Regions & AZs – Fast Snapshot Restore is available in all Availability Zones of the US East (N. Virginia), US West (Oregon), US West (N. California), Europe (Ireland), Europe (Frankfurt), Asia Pacific (Sydney), and Asia Pacific (Tokyo) Regions.

Pricing – You pay $0.75 for each hour that Fast Snapshot Restore is enabled for a snapshot in a particular Availability Zone, pro-rated and with a minimum of one hour.

Monitoring – You can use the following per-minute CloudWatch metrics to track the state of the credit bucket for each FSR-enabled snapshot:

  • FastSnapshotRestoreCreditsBalance – The number of volume creation credits that are available.
  • FastSnapshotRestoreCreditsBucketSize – The maximum number of volume creation credits that can be accumulated.

CLI & Programmatic Access – You can use the , , and commands to create and manage your accelerated snapshots from the command line. You can also use the , , and  API functions from your application code.

CloudWatch Events – You can use the EBS Fast Snapshot Restore State-change Notification event type to invoke Lambda functions or other targets when the state of a snapshot/AZ pair changes. Events are emitted on successful and unsuccessful transitions to the enabling, optimizing, enabled, disabling, and disabled states.

Data Lifecycle Manager – You can enable FSR on snapshots created by your DLM lifecycle policies, specify AZs, and specify the number of snapshots to be FSR-enabled. You can use an existing CloudFormation template to integrate FSR into your DLM policies (read about the to learn more).

In the Works
We are launching with support for snapshots that you own. Over time, we intend to expand coverage and allow you to enable Fast Snapshot Restore for snapshots that you have been granted access to.

Available Now
Fast Snapshot Restore is available now and you can start using it today!

— Jeff;

 

Sours: https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/new-amazon-ebs-fast-snapshot-restore-fsr/
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Amazon EBS Fast Snapshot Restore for Shared EBS Snapshots

Snapshots are an integral part of Amazon Elastic Block Store (EBS). Snapshots allow you to create a block-level, point-in-time copy of your volumes for backup, or disaster-recovery purposes. Snapshots are incremental, only data modified since the last snapshots are copied again. You can share snapshots between AWS Regions, or AWS Accounts. Once you have a snapshot, you can create a new Amazon Elastic Block Store (EBS) volume based on a snapshot. The new volume begins as an exact replica of the original volume that was used to create the snapshot.

When you restore volumes from snapshots, they are available for use almost instantaneously. In the background, EBS lazy loads the data from the snapshot as the operating systems accesses the blocks, this reduces the I/O performance of the volume until it is fully initialized. Some I/O demanding workloads however need the volume to operate at full capacity as soon as it is available. This is why we introduced Fast Snapshot Restore (FSR). Once enabled, FSR allows to create volumes that deliver their maximum performance and do not need to be initialized.

Many AWS customers are sharing their snapshots with other AWS Accounts, and there are many reasons to do this. You might want to centrally prepare and manage golden AMIs, with your applications, monitoring, or management tools pre-backed. In the context of Disaster Recovery (DR), your company policies might require to store all backups in one dedicated account. Until today, only the AWS Account owning the snapshot could enable FSR.

Today, you can enable Fast Snasphot Restore (FSR) on snapshots shared with you.

To enable FSR on a shared snapshot, I first create a snapshot on the source AWS Account. Once the snapshot is created, I share it with another account of mine. To do so, I click Actions, and Modify Permissions. I enter the destination AWS Account Number, click Add Permission and Save.

EBS Share Snapshots

I connect the destination account and navigate to EC2 console. When the snapshot is not visible, I check if the Private Snapshots option is selected.

EBS Private SnapshotsI select the snapshot I want to be available for FSR and select Actions, then Manage Fast Snapshot Restore.

EBS Enable fast snapshot restoreI select the Availability Zones where I want to be able to fast restore my snapshot and click Save.

Enable EBS Fast Snapshot Restore

After the settings are saved, I receive a confirmation:

FSR Restore Confirmation

The snapshot stays in enabling mode for a couple of minutes and then becomes enabled. Once done, you can create Amazon Elastic Block Store (EBS) volumes from it. The volumes are fully initialized.

You can also do all this from the API or the AWS Command Line Interface (CLI).

At any moment I can check what are the volumes I restored from a FSR.

The AWS Account where you enable Fast Snapshot Restore is charged an hourly price. The owner of the snapshot is not charged for enabling FSR in another AWS Account. When the owner of your shared snapshot deletes the snapshot or stops sharing the snapshot with you, the FSR for your shared snapshot is automatically disabled and FSR billing for the snapshot is terminated.

You can enable Fast Snapshot Restore in all commercial AWS Regions today.

As usual, let us know your feedback by posting messages on the AWS Forum, or leave a comment on this post.

-- seb
Sours: https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/amazon-ebs-fast-snapshot-restore-for-shared-ebs-snapshots/
EC2 Backup and Restore

Amazon EC2 backup and recovery with snapshots and AMIs

EBS volumes are the primary persistent storage option for Amazon EC2. You can use this block storage for structured data, such as databases, or unstructured data, such as files in a file system on a volume.

EBS volumes are placed in a specific Availability Zone. The volumes are replicated across multiple servers to prevent the loss of data from the failure of any single component. Failure refers to a complete or partial loss of the volume, depending on the size and performance of the volume.

EBS volumes are designed for an annual failure rate (AFR) of 0.1-0.2 percent. This makes EBS volumes 20 times more reliable than typical commodity disk drives, which fail with an AFR of around 4 percent. For example, if you have 1,000 EBS volumes running for 1 year, you should expect one or two volumes will have a failure.

Amazon EBS also supports a snapshot feature for taking point-in-time backups of your data. All EBS volume types offer durable snapshot capabilities and are designed for 99.999 percent availability. For more information, see the Amazon Compute Service Level Agreement.

Amazon EBS provides the ability to create snapshots (backups) of any EBS volume. A snapshot takes a copy of the EBS volume and places it in Amazon S3, where it is stored redundantly in multiple Availability Zones. The initial snapshot is a full copy of the volume; ongoing snapshots store incremental block-level changes only. You can access your snapshots on the Amazon EC2 console in the same Region that you took them. On the console, you can perform a restore operation, delete a snapshot, or update the metadata, such as tags, associated with a snapshot.

This is a fast and reliable way to restore full volume data. If you need only a partial restore, you can attach the volume to the running instance under a different device name. Then mount it, and use operating system copy commands to copy the data from the backup volume to the production volume.

Amazon EBS snapshots can also be copied between AWS Regions by using the Amazon EBS snapshot copy capability, as described in the Amazon EC2 documentation. You can use this feature to store your backup in another Region without having to manage the underlying replication technology.

Establishing separate server volumes

You may already use a standard set of separate volumes for the operating system, logs, applications, and data. By establishing separate server volumes, you can reduce the blast radius of application or platform failures due to disk space exhaustion. This risk is usually greater with physical hard drives, because you don’t have the flexibility to expand volumes quickly. With physical drives, you must purchase the new drives, back up the data, and then restore the data on the new drives. With AWS, this risk is greatly reduced because you can use Amazon EBS to expand your provisioned volumes. For more information, see the AWS documentation.

Maintain separate volumes for application data, user data, logs, and swap files so that you can use separate backup and restore policies for these resources. By separating volumes for your data, you can also use different volume types based on the performance and storage requirements for the data. You can then optimize and fine-tune your costs for different workloads.

Using AMIs or Amazon EBS snapshots for backups

Consider whether you need to create a full backup of an EC2 instance with an AMI or take a snapshot of an individual volume.

An AMI includes the following:

  • One or more snapshots. Instance-store-backed AMIs include a template for the root volume of the instance (for example, an operating system, an application server, and applications).

  • Launch permissions that control which AWS accounts can use the AMI to launch instances.

  • A block device mapping that specifies the volumes to attach to the instance when it’s launched.

You can use AMIs to launch new instances with preconfigured software and data. You can create AMIs when you want to establish a baseline, which is a reusable configuration for launching more instances. When you create an AMI of an existing EC2 instance, a snapshot is taken for all the volumes that are attached to the instance. The snapshot includes the device mappings.

You can’t use snapshots to launch a new instance, but you can use them to replace volumes on an existing instance. If you experience data corruption or a volume failure, you can create a volume from a snapshot that you have taken and replace the old volume. You can also use snapshots to provision new volumes and attach them during a new instance launch.

If you are using platform and application AMIs maintained and published by AWS or from the AWS Marketplace, consider maintaining separate volumes for your data. You can back up your data volumes as snapshots that are separate from the operating system and application volumes. Then use the data volume snapshots with newly updated AMIs published by AWS or from the AWS Marketplace. This approach requires careful testing and planning to back up and restore all custom data, including configuration information, on the newly published AMIs.

The restore process is affected by your choice between AMI backups or snapshot backups. If you create AMIs to serve as instance backups, you must launch an EC2 instance from the AMI as a part of your restore process. You might also need to shut down the existing instance to avoid potential collisions. An example of a potential collision is security identifiers (SIDs) for domain-joined Windows instances. The restore process for snapshots might require you to detach the existing volume and attach the newly restored volume. Or you might need to make a configuration change to point your applications to the newly attached volume.

AWS Backup supports both instance-level backups as AMIs and volume-level backups as separate snapshots based on the resource tags.

Considerations for instance store volumes

An instance store provides temporary block-level storage for your instance. This storage is located on disks that are physically attached to the host computer. Instance stores are ideal for temporary storage of information that changes frequently, such as buffers, caches, scratch data, and other temporary content. They are also preferable for data that are replicated across a fleet of instances, such as a load balanced pool of web servers.

The data in an instance store persists only during the lifetime of its associated instance. If an instance reboots (intentionally or unintentionally), data in the instance store persists. However, data in the instance store is lost under any of the following circumstances.

  • The underlying drive fails.

  • The instance stops.

  • The instance terminates.

Therefore, do not rely on an instance store for valuable, long-term data. Instead, use more durable data storage, such as Amazon S3, Amazon EBS, or Amazon EFS.

A common strategy with instance store volumes is to persist necessary data to Amazon S3 regularly as needed, based on the RPO and RTO. You can then download the data from Amazon S3 to your instance store when a new instance is launched. You can also upload the data to Amazon S3 before an instance is stopped. For persistence, create an EBS volume, attach it to your instance, and copy the data from the instance store volume to the EBS volume on a periodic basis. For more information, see the AWS Knowledge Center.

Tagging and enforcing standards for EBS snapshots and AMIs

Tagging all your AWS resources is an important practice for cost allocation, auditing, troubleshooting, and notification. Tagging is important for EBS volumes so that the pertinent information required to manage and restore volumes is present. Tags are not automatically copied from EC2 instances to AMIs or from source volumes to snapshots. Make sure that your backup process includes the relevant tags from these sources. This helps you to set the snapshot metadata, such as access policies, attachment information, and cost allocation, to use these backups in the future. For more information on tagging your AWS resources, refer to the tagging best practices technical paper.

In addition to the tags you use for all AWS resources, use the following backup-specific tags:

  • Source instance ID

  • Source volume ID (for snapshots)

  • Recovery point description

You can enforce tagging policies by using AWS Config rules and IAM permissions. IAM supports enforced tag usage, so you can write IAM policies that mandate the use of specific tags when acting on Amazon EBS snapshots. If a operation is attempted without the tags defined in the IAM permissions policy granting rights, the snapshot creation fails with access denied. For more information, see the blog post on tagging Amazon EBS snapshots on creation and implementing stronger security policies.

You can use AWS Config rules to evaluate the configuration settings of your AWS resources automatically. To help you get started, AWS Config provides customizable, predefined rules called managed rules. You can also create your own custom rules. While AWS Config continuously tracks configuration changes among your resources, it checks whether these changes violate any of the conditions in your rules. If a resource violates a rule, AWS Config flags the resource and the rule as noncompliant. Note that the required-tags managed rule does not currently support snapshots and AMIs.

Sours: https://docs.aws.amazon.com/prescriptive-guidance/latest/backup-recovery/ec2-backup.html

Restore aws snapshot

Restoring from an Amazon EBS snapshot or an AMI

To reduce the recovery time and impact to dependent applications and processes, your restore process must consider the resource that it is replacing. For best results, regularly test your restore process in lower environments (for example, non-production) to verify that your process meets your RPO and RTO and that the restore process works as expected. Consider how the restore process will impact applications and services that depend on the instance you are restoring, and then coordinate the restore as necessary. Try to automate and test the restore process as much as possible to reduce the risk of your restore process failing or being implemented inconsistently.

Data from an Amazon EBS snapshot is asynchronously loaded into an EBS volume. If an application accesses the volume where the data is not loaded, there is higher latency than normal while the data is loaded from Amazon S3. To avoid this impact for latency-sensitive applications, you can pre-warm your data from a snapshot into an EBS volume. For an additional charge, Amazon EBS supports fast snapshot restore, which reduces the need to pre-warm your data.

Your workload architecture impacts your restore procedure. For example, if you use Elastic Load Balancing, with multiple instances servicing traffic, you can take a failed or impaired instance out of service. Then you can restore a new instance to replace it while the other instances continue to service traffic without disruption to users.

The following restore processes described are for instances that are not using Elastic Load Balancing.

Restoring an EBS volume from an Amazon EBS snapshot

You can restore a non-root volume attached to an existing EC2 instance by creating a volume from a snapshot and attaching it to your instance. You can use the console, the AWS CLI, or the API operations to create a volume from an existing snapshot. You can then mount the volume to the instance by using the operating system.

If you are replacing a volume that must use the same mount point, unmount that volume so that you can mount the new volume in its place. To unmount the volume, first stop any processes that are using the volume.

For example, follow these steps to restore a volume to an earlier point-in-time backup by using the console:

  1. On the Amazon EC2 console, on the Elastic Block Store menu, choose Snapshots.

  2. Search for the snapshot that you want to restore, and select it.

  3. Choose Actions, and then choose Create Volume.

  4. Create the new volume in the same Availability Zone as your EC2 instance.

  5. On the Amazon EC2 console, select the instance.

  6. In the instance details, make note of the device name that you want to replace in the Root device entry or Block Devices entries.

  7. Attach the volume. The process differs for root volumes and non-root volumes.

    For root volumes:

    1. Stop the EC2 instance.

    2. On the EC2 Elastic Block Store Volumes menu, select the root volume that you want to replace.

    3. Choose Actions, and then choose Detach Volume.

    4. On the EC2 Elastic Block Store Volumes menu, select the new volume.

    5. Choose Actions, and then choose Attach Volume.

    6. Select the instance that you want to attach the volume to, and use the same device name that you noted earlier.

    For non-root volumes:

    1. Attach the new volume by choosing it on the EC2 Elastic Block Store Volumes menu and then choosing Actions, Attach Volume. Select the instance that you want to attach it to, and then select an available device name.

    2. Using the operating system for the instance, unmount the existing volume, and then mount the new volume in its place.

      In Linux, you can use the command. In Windows, you can use a logical volume manager (LVM) such as the Disk Management system utility.

    3. Detach any prior volumes that you may be replacing by choosing it on the EC2 Elastic Block Store Volumes menu and then choosing Actions, Detach Volume.

You can also use the AWS CLI in combination with operating system commands to automate these steps.

Restoring a running instance from an AMI

You can bring up a new instance from your AMI backup to replace an existing, running instance. One approach is to stop the existing instance, keep it offline while you launch a new instance from your AMI, and perform any necessary updates. This approach reduces the risk of conflicts from both instances running simultaneously. It is an acceptable approach if the services that your instance provides are down or you are performing the restore during a maintenance window. After you test your new instance, you can reassign any Elastic IP addresses that were allocated to the old instance. Then you can update any Domain Name Service (DNS) records to point to the new instance.

However, if during a restore you must minimize the downtime of your in-service instance, consider launching and testing a new instance from your AMI backup. Then replace the existing instance with the new instance.

While both instances are running, you must prevent the new instance from causing any platform-level or application-level collisions. For example, you might run into problems with domain-joined Windows instances that are running with the same SIDs and computer name. You might encounter similar issues with network applications and services that require unique identifiers.

You can use security groups to temporarily block all inbound connections for your new instance except for your own IP address for access and testing. This will prevent other servers and services from connecting to and utilizing your new instance before it is ready. You can also block outbound connections temporarily for the new instance to prevent services and applications from initiating any connections or updates to other resources. When ready, stop the existing instance, and then start services and processes on the new instance.

Document Conventions

Create EBS volume backups

Backup and recovery from on-premises infrastructure to AWS

Sours: https://docs.aws.amazon.com/prescriptive-guidance/latest/backup-recovery/restore.html
Como fazer restore de um snapshot ou AMI da AWS [BACKUP/RESTORE - PARTE 2 de 2]

Restoring from a DB snapshot

Amazon RDS creates a storage volume snapshot of your DB instance, backing up the entire DB instance and not just individual databases. You can create a new DB instance by restoring from a DB snapshot. You provide the name of the DB snapshot to restore from, and then provide a name for the new DB instance that is created from the restore. You can't restore from a DB snapshot to an existing DB instance; a new DB instance is created when you restore.

You can use the restored DB instance as soon as its status is . The DB instance continues to load data in the background. This is known as lazy loading.

If you access data that hasn't been loaded yet, the DB instance immediately downloads the requested data from Amazon S3, and then continues loading the rest of the data in the background. For more information, see Amazon EBS snapshots.

To help mitigate the effects of lazy loading on tables to which you require quick access, you can perform operations that involve full-table scans, such as . This allows Amazon RDS to download all of the backed-up table data from S3.

You can restore a DB instance and use a different storage type than the source DB snapshot. In this case, the restoration process is slower because of the additional work required to migrate the data to the new storage type. If you restore to or from magnetic storage, the migration process is the slowest. That's because magnetic storage doesn't have the IOPS capability of Provisioned IOPS or General Purpose (SSD) storage.

You can use AWS CloudFormation to restore a DB instance from a DB instance snapshot. For more information, see AWS::RDS::DBInstance in the AWS CloudFormation User Guide.

Note

You can't restore a DB instance from a DB snapshot that is both shared and encrypted. Instead, you can make a copy of the DB snapshot and restore the DB instance from the copy. For more information, see Copying a snapshot.

Parameter group considerations

We recommend that you retain the parameter group for any DB snapshots you create, so that you can associate your restored DB instance with the correct parameter group. You can specify the parameter group when you restore the DB instance.

Security group considerations

When you restore a DB instance, the default security group is associated with the restored instance by default.

Note

  • If you're using the Amazon RDS console, you can specify a custom security group to associate with the instance or create a new VPC security group.

  • If you're using the AWS CLI, you can specify a custom security group to associate with the instance by including the option in the command.

  • If you're using the Amazon RDS API, you can include the parameter in the action.

As soon as the restore is complete and your new DB instance is available, you can associate any custom security groups used by the snapshot you restored from. You must apply these changes by modifying the DB instance with the RDS console, the AWS CLI command, or the Amazon RDS API operation. For more information, see Modifying an Amazon RDS DB instance.

Option group considerations

When you restore a DB instance, the option group associated with the DB snapshot is associated with the restored DB instance after it is created. For example, if the DB snapshot you are restoring from uses Oracle Transparent Data Encryption, the restored DB instance will use the same option group.

When you assign an option group to a DB instance, the option group is also linked to the supported platform the DB instance is on, either VPC or EC2-Classic (non-VPC). If a DB instance is in a VPC, the option group associated with the DB instance is linked to that VPC. This means that you can't use the option group assigned to a DB instance if you attempt to restore the instance into a different VPC or onto a different platform. If you restore a DB instance into a different VPC or onto a different platform, you must either assign the default option group to the instance, assign an option group that is linked to that VPC or platform, or create a new option group and assign it to the DB instance. For persistent or permanent options, when restoring a DB instance into a different VPC you must create a new option group that includes the persistent or permanent option.

Microsoft SQL Server considerations

When you restore an RDS for Microsoft SQL Server DB snapshot to a new instance, you can always restore to the same edition as your snapshot. In some cases, you can also change the edition of the DB instance. The following limitations apply when you change editions:

  • The DB snapshot must have enough storage allocated for the new edition.

  • Only the following edition changes are supported:

    • From Standard Edition to Enterprise Edition

    • From Web Edition to Standard Edition or Enterprise Edition

    • From Express Edition to Web Edition, Standard Edition, or Enterprise Edition

If you want to change from one edition to a new edition that isn't supported by restoring a snapshot, you can try using the native backup and restore feature. SQL Server verifies whether your database is compatible with the new edition based on what SQL Server features you have enabled on the database. For more information, see Importing and exporting SQL Server databases.

Oracle Database considerations

If you use Oracle GoldenGate, always retain the parameter group with the parameter. When you restore a DB instance from a DB snapshot, specify a parameter group that has a matching or greater value.

If you restore a snapshot of a CDB instance, you can change the PDB name. You can't change the CDB name, which is always . This CDB name is the same for all RDS instances that use a single-tenant architecture. For more information, see Snapshots in a single-tenant architecture.

Before you restore a DB snapshot, you can upgrade it to a later release. For more information, see Upgrading an Oracle DB snapshot.

Restoring from a snapshot

You can restore a DB instance from a DB snapshot using the AWS Management Console, the AWS CLI, or the RDS API.

Sours: https://docs.aws.amazon.com/AmazonRDS/latest/UserGuide/USER_RestoreFromSnapshot.html

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Tutorial: Restore a DB instance from a DB snapshot

A common scenario when working with Amazon RDS is to have a DB instance that you work with occasionally but that you don't need full time. For example, you might have a quarterly customer survey that uses an Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (Amazon EC2) instance to host a customer survey website and a DB instance that is used to store the survey results. One way to save money on such a scenario is to take a DB snapshot of the DB instance after the survey is completed, delete the DB instance, and then restore the DB instance when you need to conduct the survey again.

In the following illustration, you can see a possible scenario where an EC2 instance hosting a customer survey website is in the same Amazon Virtual Private Cloud (Amazon VPC) as a DB instance that retains the customer survey data. Note that each instance has its own security group; the EC2 instance security group allows access from the internet while the DB instance security group allows access only to and from the EC2 instance. When the survey is done, the EC2 instance can be stopped and the DB instance can be deleted after a final DB snapshot is created. When you need to conduct another survey, you can restart the EC2 instance and restore the DB instance from the DB snapshot.

For information about how to set up the needed VPC security groups for this scenario that allows the EC2 instance to connect with the DB instance, see A DB instance in a VPC accessed by an EC2 instance in the same VPC.

You must create a DB snapshot before you can restore a DB instance from one. When you restore the DB instance, you provide the name of the DB snapshot to restore from, and then provide a name for the new DB instance that is created from the restore operation. You cannot restore from a DB snapshot to an existing DB instance; a new DB instance is created when you restore.

Prerequisites for restoring a DB instance from a DB snapshot

Some settings on the restored DB instance are reset when the instance is restored, so you must retain the original resources to be able to restore the DB instance to its previous settings. For example, when you restore a DB instance from a DB snapshot, the default DB parameter and a default security group are associated with the restored instance. That association means that the default security group does not allow access to the DB instance, and no custom parameter settings are available in the default parameter group. You need to retain the DB parameter group and security group associated with the DB instance that was used to create the DB snapshot.

The following are required before you can restore a DB instance from a DB snapshot:

  • You must have created a DB snapshot of a DB instance before you can restore a DB instance from that DB snapshot. For more information about creating a DB snapshot, see Creating a DB snapshot.

  • You must retain the parameter group and security group associated with the DB instance you created the DB snapshot from.

  • You need to determine the correct option group for the restored DB instance:

    • The option group associated with the DB snapshot that you restore from is associated with the restored DB instance once it is created. For example, if the DB snapshot you restore from uses Oracle Transparent Data Encryption (TDE), the restored DB instance uses the same option group, which had the TDE option.

    • You cannot use the option group associated with the original DB instance if you attempt to restore that instance into a different VPC or into a different platform. This restriction occurs because when an option group is assigned to a DB instance, it is also linked to the platform that the DB instance is on, either VPC or EC2-Classic (non-VPC). If a DB instance is in a VPC, the option group associated with the instance is linked to that VPC.

    • If you restore a DB instance into a different VPC or onto a different platform, you must either assign the default option group to the instance, assign an option group that is linked to that VPC or platform, or create a new option group and assign it to the DB instance. Note that with persistent or permanent options, such as Oracle TDE, you must create a new option group that includes the persistent or permanent option when restoring a DB instance into a different VPC. For more information about working with option groups, see Working with option groups.

Restoring a DB instance from a DB snapshot

You can use the procedure following to restore from a snapshot in the AWS Management Console.

To restore a DB instance from a DB snapshot

  1. Sign in to the AWS Management Console and open the Amazon RDS console at https://console.aws.amazon.com/rds/.

  2. In the navigation pane, choose Snapshots.

  3. Choose the DB snapshot that you want to restore from.

  4. For Actions, choose Restore snapshot.

    The Restore snapshot page appears.

  5. For DB Instance identifier under Settings, enter the unique name that you want to use for the restored DB instance.

    If you're restoring from a DB instance that you deleted after you made the DB snapshot, you can use the name of that DB instance.

  6. Choose additional settings as needed.

  7. Choose Restore DB Instance.

Modifying a restored DB instance

As soon as the restore operation is complete, you should associate the custom security group used by the instance you restored from with any applicable custom DB parameter group that you might have. Only the default DB parameter and security groups are associated with the restored instance. If you want to restore the functionality of the DB instance to that of the DB instance that the snapshot was created from, you must modify the DB instance to use the security group and parameter group used by the previous DB instance.

You must apply any changes explicitly using the RDS console's Modify command, the API, or the command line tool, once the DB instance is available. We recommend that you retain parameter groups for any DB snapshots you have so that you can associate a restored instance with the correct parameter file.

You can modify other settings on the restored DB instance. For example, you can use a different storage type than the source DB snapshot. In this case the restoration process is slower because of the additional work required to migrate the data to the new storage type. In the case of restoring to or from Magnetic (Standard) storage, the migration process is the slowest, because Magnetic storage does not have the IOPS capability of Provisioned IOPS or General Purpose (SSD) storage.

The next steps assume that your DB instance is in a VPC. If your DB instance is not in a VPC, use the AWS Management Console to locate the DB security group you need for the DB instance.

To modify a restored DB instance to have the settings of the original DB instance

  1. Sign in to the AWS Management Console and open the Amazon RDS console at https://console.aws.amazon.com/rds/.

  2. In the navigation pane, choose Databases.

  3. Choose the name of the DB instance created when you restored from the DB snapshot to display its details. Choose the Connectivity tab. The security group assigned to the DB instance might not allow access. If there are no inbound rules, no permissions exist that allow inbound access.

  4. Choose Modify.

  5. In the Network & Security section, choose the security group that you want to use for your DB instance. If you need to add rules to create a new security group to use with an EC2 instance, see A DB instance in a VPC accessed by an EC2 instance in the same VPC for more information.

    You can also remove a security group by choosing the X associated with it.

  6. Choose Continue, and then choose Apply immediately.

  7. Choose Modify DB Instance.

    After the instance status is available, choose the DB instance name to display its details. Choose the Connectivity tab, and confirm that the new security group has been applied, making the DB instance authorized for access.

Sours: https://docs.aws.amazon.com/AmazonRDS/latest/UserGuide/CHAP_Tutorials.RestoringFromSnapshot.html


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