Mower deck storage

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Mower Storage Tips – How To Store Your Mower For Winter

If you have a mower, you’ve probably had an uneasy feeling that you should tuck it in somehow for the winter. But the gutters need cleaning and the leaves need raking, and somehow it’s easy to neglect the mower. These mower storage tips are really fairly simple, and can save you a lot of expensive repair bills down the road by practicing proper mower storage.

Get your mower ready for the last drive-in of the season.

  1. Store indoors
  2. Take care of fuel
  3. Clean off grass clippings
  4. Keep air in the tires
  5. Keep battery charged

1. Mower Storage Indoors

Do you store your mower outside? If so, its useful lifespan will be shorter. Two main problems:

  1. Sun: Sun can fade paint and plastic parts. But it can also make them more brittle and susceptible to cracking or breaking. Engine covers are particularly prone to cracking, as they are constantly being opened and closed. Mower seats are also prone to cracking. Cracked mower seats are useful for storing rain and transferring it to your posterior. Other than that, they’re mostly just unsightly.
  2. Moisture:  As you can imagine, mowers like to be kept dry. Moisture can collect and pool, and can cause rust.

Are you out of room in your garage? A shed is a great place to store a mower, and keep it out of sun and snow. If you don’t have a shed yet … well, we’d love to help you! Sheds come in all sizes, from just big enough to squeeze in your riding mower (6×8), to ample room for your ’55 Chevy “Gasser” drag racer and your mower besides.

Take Care of Fuel

Rolland Schrock of Schrock Tool and Saw has been selling and repairing equipment since the early ’90s. He’s a walking encyclopedia of small engine facts, and has helped us out with the following four Mower Storage Tips.

The biggest issue with mower storage is the fuel.

The Problem. Over time, fuel gets old and begins to break down. It will gum up the carburetor and the fuel system. When this happens, your mower won’t run right. Off to the mower repair you go for another repair bill!

Fuel with ethanol is particularly bad. Every gas station in the country sells fuel with 10% ethanol, which is actually alcohol made from plants. Ethanol is hard on your mower. Here is a Popular Mechanics article that explains why ethanol wrecks your mower’s fuel system. The good news is that you can also buy ethanol-free gas. It may take some looking around for you to find ethanol-free fuel. It’s worth the look.

Back to mower storage tips …

The Solution:  Here are a few tips to keep your fuel system in tip-top shape:

  • The biggest thing is to keep the fuel fresh. If you are only running an engine 2-3 times a year (more likely with your hedge trimmer than your mower), you’re not running enough fuel through it. You should be running at least 2 gallons of fuel each year. If you are running less than that, you need to use canned gas. Canned gas doesn’t break down and gum up the fuel system. It is available from any reputable dealer of lawn equipment. It’s expensive, but cheaper than a repair bill.
  • Another great storage solution is to use fresh, high-octane, ethanol-free gasoline. But you still need a fuel stabilizer over the winter. The stabilizer will keep the fuel from breaking down. Which will keep your mower from breaking down.

Extra Credit. The best way of getting your fuel system ready for storage is to let the mower run dry, then fill it with new fuel. Be sure to run the mower for a few minutes to let the fuel circulate through the system.

Pro Tip: Some people like to just run the mower dry, so that there’s no fuel in it over winter. That doesn’t work. Your best bet is a full tank.  Here’s a helpful article with more details.

“Canned gas” is high octane, and contains no ethanol. Shelf life is about 2 years after opening — much longer than gas from the pump.

Clean Off Grass Clippings

The Problem. Have you ever wondered why mower decks so often rust through? Grass clippings can accumulate both on top of and below the mower deck. This causes problems in two ways.

  1. First, when green grass clippings rot, they turn acidic. (If you’ve smelled rotting grass, and had your nostrils stung by the fumes, you know what we’re talking about.) This eats through paint, and eventually through the metal itself.
  2. Second, even completely dry clippings can gather moisture. If you happen to leave your mower outside in the rain, the clippings will gather moisture and hold it, promoting rust on your deck.

The Solution. Keep grass clippings cleaned off above and below. Compressed air is the easiest way to clean off the upper side. Underneath, the grass cakes against the mower deck. A putty knife is a great tool here.

Pro Tip. Turn off the mower blades before cleaning the deck.

Mowing is dirty work. Keep the mower deck clean.

Extra Credit. What about washing the deck? Rolland says, “Don’t kill it with kindness.” Obviously, if you’ve got mud on your deck, you’ll need to wash it off. But if you make a habit of regularly washing the mower deck, you can get moisture in the very bearings that keep your blades humming. Moisture in the bearings = failed bearings. Enough said.

Keep Air in the Tires

The Problem. Tires tend to lose air over time. When tires go flat, your mower ends up sitting on the rim — which is hard on your tires.

The Solution. Be sure that before you store your mower for the winter, the tires are aired up to capacity.

Keep Your Battery Charged

The Problem. Batteries drain over time. Allowing batteries to drain down reduces their lifespan.

The Solution. You have a few options.

  1. Charge the battery up a few times over the winter.
  2. If you don’t think you’ll get that done, you can use a trickle charger. A trickle charger, or battery tender, will keep the battery charged up. Is your shed off the grid? You can even get solar battery tenders.

Pro Tip. Some people like to run the mower for 5-10 minutes every once in a while, to keep everything in good shape. That doesn’t work. First, you take out more from the battery than you put back. And second, by not letting the engine get good and hot, you actually invite condensation inside the engine. (That’s a bad thing.) So, if you’re going to run it, let it run for at least 1/2 hour to recharge the battery and burn off the condensation.

Bonus mower storage tip – Changing Oil

You should change your mower’s engine oil each year. But should it happen fall or spring?

Turns out, it doesn’t really matter. Rolland notes that it may be a little better in the spring, since you can get rid of any condensation that might collect in the winter. But, he sees very few condensation problems come into the shop. And those that he does see, probably come from being started and run only a brief time.

Needing indoor storage for your mower? Check out our sheds!

Sours: https://www.ulrichlifestyle.com/news/mower-storage-tips/

Pajamas wrote: ↑Sat Aug 26, 2017 9:51 pm...
Seems like you threw the baby out with the bathwater. Just because something with positive benefits is not suitable for use all of the time, doesn't mean that you can't use it some of the time, when it is appropriate to do so. It's hard to think of consumer goods that are suitable for every single circumstance.

The short answer. You've answered your own question.

In the beginning I thought as you, but eventually decided that a partial solution is not a suitable solution. Why? If a homeowner wants to maintain a lawn (multiple separate decisions) and do his own mowing, then that one task needs only one suitable solution.



The long answer.

After buying a house, I indulged a lawn tractor hobby so had multiple lawn cutting tools.
--Corded electric mulching mower (B&D: not as good as the non-OSH electric I used as a teenager),
--Reel push mower (Scotts Classic: worked so-so; there are reported to be better brands/models),
--and at one time 2 lawn tractors and their attachments (fun riding to mow and a real hoot to blow snow).

But eventually aged and lost interest in playing with and maintaining heavy lawn tractors/attachments, so sold everything to reclaim a whole garage bay and covered patio.

The reel mower went because it was not suitable for tall grass. If I need another tool to overcome its limitations, then it's not a suitable solution. (The proper tool will work with my limitations, not force me to work within its.)

The mulching corded electric mower went because it was underpowered and left uncut grass stripes in the lawn. (Another forum topic discusses solutions for uncut grass stripes left by a Honda mulching mower. One of the remembered solutions was to convert Honda to side discharge to increase under-deck vacuum to stand grass up before cutting.)

The lawn tractors/attachments went because they were large (required more storage space), heavy (swapping attachments was no longer easy), and required more maintenance. (Also sold the HF folding trailer I'd built just to move them around, freeing up more space and avoided annual registration fee.)


Today I use a self-propelled side-discharge gas mower with a disk transmission (Snapper Convertible: mulch, bag, side discharge, $150 off CL.). It's light enough (~150 lbs) so I can easily handle it. It's small (relatively, vs lawn tractors/attachments) so takes up little space. It's powerful enough to (slowly) handle deep grass and light brush (to maintain a fence row). Side discharge increases under-deck vacuum so no longer have uncut grass stripes in lawn. It's range is limited only by fuel/oil and my endurance. I can fix a disk transmission and swap a blown motor, so it should outlive me.


IMO a rotary side-discharge gas mower is the 90% lawn mowing solution for most small-estate homeowners who want to cut their own lawn---it does everything well enough and can come to the rescue where a reel mower would fail and a corded electric would annoy. If it can also mulch and bag, then great!

If the same capability is today available in a self-propelled rotary electric mower (lighter, quieter, less maintenance), then great!

d.r.a., not dr.a. | I'm a novice investor, you are forewarned.

Sours: https://www.bogleheads.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=226416
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That’s where our need for deck axles started. Trying to get to the underside of the mower deck to clean the dried-on debris was cumbersome to say the least. Moving the mower deck out of the way for storage during the winter, or when using attachments, needed to be easier and more space efficient.

We manufacture swiveling deck axles for decks up to 72″ on John Deere, Massey Ferguson, Cub Cadet, Kubota, and TYM tractors. If you have a different deck please feel free to contact us and we will see what we can do.

After selling deck axles locally we decided to make them available online.

All of our axles are 18 inches long. Prices ranges from $130 – $155 plus $20 Priority shipping.

We are closing out our inventory of swiveling deck axles for the Deere 60″ decks that were installed on 445, 455 and similar garden tractors. The price for the swiveling deck axles is $100 + $20 USPS priority shipping.

We’ve mounted casters on our axles to give them ‘steerability’. This mobility makes turning corners and rolling into and around tight spaces easier while maintaining stability to make deck cleaning easier. Then you can lock the casters and store the deck tucked-away until you need it the next time.

Due to the numerous deck design variations (even within the same model line), we may request that you provide photos of your deck so we can be sure to send you the axle set that is compatible with your deck.

Please contact us at:

.

Thank you

Sours: https://deckaxles.com/
DeckAxles.com -- Mower deck storing stands. Swiveling wheels deck dolly.

Space-Saving Mower Deck Storage

"I built it because my Kubota mower deck was taking up too much floor space in my garage," says Larry Cohenno, Willet, N.Y., who came up with a pair of small wheels and axles that allow him to store his 60-in. deck vertically instead of horizontally.
  "Every year I remove the deck for the winter so that I can install a snow blade on the tractor. This idea saves space and also makes the deck easier to service," says Cohenno.
  The patent pending axles are 13 in. long and fitted with 3-in. high wheels. They mount in place of a pair of anti-scalping wheels on back of the deck. Cohenno simply pins the axles on in place of the scalping wheels.
  The axles are made from 1-in. dia. steel. "The kit is designed specifically for Kubota mid-mount mower decks, but I think the same idea would work with other brand name decks using four anti-scalp wheels with 1-in. dia. shafts. The wheels are rated at 250 lbs. apiece so I don't think they'd have any problem supporting a 300-lb. deck," notes Cohenno.
  Cohenno sells the wheels and axles on Ebay.com and Tractorbynet.com for $69.95 including S&H in the 48 contiguous states. He also wholesales them to dealers for $62 who sell them at a retail price of $99.95.
  Contact: FARM SHOW Followup, Larry Cohenno Sr., 710 State Route 26, Willet, N.Y. 13863 (ph 607 863-4208; email: [email protected]).


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Space-Saving Mower Deck Storage FARM HOME Lawn Mowers (31h,38) 27-4-39 "I built it because my Kubota mower deck was taking up too much floor space in my garage," says Larry Cohenno, Willet, N.Y., who came up with a pair of small wheels and axles that allow him to store his 60-in. deck vertically instead of horizontally. "Every year I remove the deck for the winter so that I can install a snow blade on the tractor. This idea saves space and also makes the deck easier to service," says Cohenno. The patent pending axles are 13 in. long and fitted with 3-in. high wheels. They mount in place of a pair of anti-scalping wheels on back of the deck. Cohenno simply pins the axles on in place of the scalping wheels. The axles are made from 1-in. dia. steel. "The kit is designed specifically for Kubota mid-mount mower decks, but I think the same idea would work with other brand name decks using four anti-scalp wheels with 1-in. dia. shafts. The wheels are rated at 250 lbs. apiece so I don't think they'd have any problem supporting a 300-lb. deck," notes Cohenno. Cohenno sells the wheels and axles on Ebay.com and Tractorbynet.com for $69.95 including S&H in the 48 contiguous states. He also wholesales them to dealers for $62 who sell them at a retail price of $99.95. Contact: FARM SHOW Followup, Larry Cohenno Sr., 710 State Route 26, Willet, N.Y. 13863 (ph 607 863-4208; email: [email protected]).

To read the rest of this story, download this issue below or click here to register with your account number.

2003 - Volume #27, Issue #4
Sours: https://www.farmshow.com/a_article.php?aid=16224

Deck storage mower

The Best Outdoor Storage of 2021

Arrow Newport Metal Shed

Large outdoor storage sheds are the perfect place to store lawn mowers and other oversized equipment. If you're looking to add a storage shed to your outdoor space, you’ll be amazed at the affordable price of the Arrow Newport Galvanized Metal Shed. This shed is 10 x 8 feet, and it has a 444-cubic-foot capacity that can accommodate tractors, snow blowers, and other tools and equipment that should be stored out of the elements. 

This shed has a lockable sliding door with a 55-1/2 inch doorway, and its interior peak is just under 6-1/2 feet, allowing most people to walk inside comfortably. The shed’s galvanized steel construction is able to withstand wind and snow, and its pitched roof helps ensure precipitation runs off, preventing standing water and leaks.

The unit comes with a foundation kit that you can use to install plywood floors (wood not included), and while assembling the shed is time-consuming, it’s a worthwhile purchase, especially considering the reasonable price.

The 5 Best Outdoor Storage Sheds of 2021

Sours: https://www.thespruce.com/best-outdoor-storage-5076801
John Deere 60D Mower Deck Wheel Storage Kit

What do you do with the area under your deck? Nothing will grow there, except for a few weeds. Some people keep the area covered with mulch, so it isn’t a muddy mess, then they forget about it. Wouldn’t it be nice to make that space useful? Well, what about making the space into a storage area for your stuff?

If the ground under your deck is relatively level, and if there is at least five feet between the ground and the deck floor joists, then converting the area under the deck into storage space is a project worth considering.

Here, we will briefly discuss what you should consider before attempting to convert the area under your deck into a storage area, as well as some ideas about how you might undertake this project.

Determine Your Deck’s Condition

It does not make sense to invest time and money on the area under a deck that is unsafe, or in poor condition. If you’re unsure about the state of your deck, call in a qualified building inspector to give you an expert assessment.

A professional may be willing to provide some informal feedback about your storage space project, and about what you might do to improve the condition of your deck. An assessment of the condition of your deck can be useful, even if you decide not to proceed with your deck storage project.

Settle on a Storage Plan

Your next task is to define your objectives for the storage area under your deck, and to identify issues that might limit what you can do. Here are some questions to ask yourself:

  1. What do you want to store under your deck?
  2. What conditions do those items need in order to preserve them in good condition? For example, do they need to be in a dry area, or can they withstand limited exposure to water?
  3. Are you concerned about theft?
  4. Does your neighborhood have restrictive covenants that might impact your project?

Now that you’ve checked out your deck’s condition and determined what you want to store in the under-deck area, it’s time to decide on options that will suit your needs.

Option #1: Deck Storage for Items That Can Withstand Moisture Exposure

This is a low-cost project, but it’s DIY friendly and suitable for storing items under a deck that can stand exposure to moisture.

If headspace beneath your deck is limited, and if you need to store stuff like gardening tools and supplies or materials that can be protected in bags or containers, this storage project will work well for you.

Your new storage area could also house a lawn mower or garden tractor if these machines can be protected with tarp covers.

Project Conditions:

  1. Height under the deck is five feet or more.
  2. Ground under the deck is reasonably level, and can be sloped at least ¼ inch per foot to drain water.
  3. Ground around deck post footings will not be disturbed by the project.
  4. No equipment is under the deck, such as an air conditioning condenser, a gas meter or an electricity meter, an electrical panel, or the septic tank.
  5. No vents or exhaust duct terminations are under the deck, such as a vent serving a high-efficiency furnace, or a clothes dryer exhaust duct; a bathroom exhaust duct termination is okay.

Project Steps:

  1. Grade the area under deck to slope about ¼ inch per foot toward a drainage point (usually where the door will be located), extend this area about three feet beyond the deck on the side where the door will be located, compact disturbed soil with a hand tamper.
  2. Cover the graded area under the deck with geotextile fabric.
  3. Spread a 4-inch thick layer of crushed stone on top of the geotextile fabric.
  4. Compact the stone with a hand tamper.
  5. Build a frame to support the lattice using preservative-treated lumber (usually 2 x 4), support the frame on concrete blocks where necessary.
  6. Install the lattice on the frame according to the lattice manufacturer’s instructions.
  7. Build at least a 3-foot wide door using the lumber and the lattice.
  8. Install the door using the hinges and latch.

Option #2: Build a Semi-Dry Storage Area

This is a medium to high-cost project that will provide protection from water intrusion into the storage area, and will provide some security against theft. The cost and level of water intrusion protection will depend on the water drainage system you select.

The skill level required will also depend on the water drainage system you select. Some systems require a contractor that is trained on how to install the water drainage system. Other systems may be suitable for someone with intermediate DIY skill. A two-person or more crew is recommended.

This storage area is appropriate for storing things such as gasoline-powered equipment, lawn and garden tools and supplies, and leftover materials from other projects, including some wood, if the materials are protected from the water intrusion. Do not store wood on the storage area floor if you live in termite country, which is most of the United States.

Water Drainage Systems Include Installing:

  1. A waterproof membrane that is designed for pedestrian walking on top of the deck.
  2. A flexible membrane above the deck floor joists and below the deck floor boards.
  3. Various systems that are designed to be installed under the deck floor joists.

The waterproof membrane system is for those who want a completely dry area under the deck that might be suitable for finished interior space. This system is for newer decks that are safe and in good condition. A contractor should install the membrane per manufacturer’s instructions. This is the highest cost system. An example is Duradek.

The flexible membrane system is for those who want a mostly dry area under the deck. This system is for a new deck, or for a deck that is being renovated, because the membrane must be installed before the deck floor is installed. Someone with intermediate DIY skill may be able to install these systems per manufacturer’s instructions. This is a medium cost option. An example is Trex RainEscape.

The under-deck system option is for those who want a mostly dry area under the deck. This option can be installed under an existing deck that is safe and in good condition. Someone with intermediate DIY skill may be able to install these systems per manufacturer’s instructions. This is a medium cost option. An example is Zipup.

When deciding about which system is best for you, you should consider that the flexible membrane and the under-deck systems require that you keep your deck clear of debris that could fall between the deck boards. This debris can block the water drainage and cause the water to back up into the house and cause significant damage.

Project Conditions: Are the same as for Option #1, or as required by the water drainage system manufacturer’s instructions.

Basic project steps:

  1. Complete steps 1, 2, and 3 in Option #1.
  2. Install the water drainage system per manufacturer’s instructions.
  3. Build a frame to support the siding using preservative-treated lumber (usually 2 x 4).
  4. Support the frame on concrete blocks where necessary, be sure to keep wood that is not preservative-treated at least six inches above the soil.
  5. Install the corner boards and the siding on the frame per the siding manufacturer’s instructions.
  6. Build at least a 3-foot wide door using the lumber and siding
  7. Install the door using the hinges and latch
  8. caulk and paint the corner boards, siding, and door per the siding and paint manufacturer’s instructions.

Every Deck is Different

Each deck is different, each area under the deck is different, and each house is different. The devil, it is said, is in the details, and the details about how to convert your deck into a storage area will be different for every situation.

This article assumes a do-it-yourself project, and assumes a deck that is safe, in good condition, and that has many years of service life remaining. If the deck needs to be replaced, then many more opportunities are available. Designing and building a storage area under a new deck is the ideal situation, and is a project that is well worth considering because it can add as much or more value than the cost.

Note that a building permit may be required for these projects in some jurisdictions. Check with your building department about their requirements.

Sours: https://www.thisoldhouse.com/decking/21177330/building-under-deck-storage

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Sheds & Outdoor Storage

Sheds & Outdoor Storage

Want to beautify your yard and get more organized at the same time? The outdoor storage solutions at Sam’s Club can help you do just that. Outdoor storage is extremely versatile. From protecting the cushions on your outdoor furniture to keeping your lawn and garden supplies organized, there are many reasons to consider some outdoor storage.

Outdoor Storage Boxes

If you only need a small amount of storage space, you might want to opt for an outdoor storage box. Storage boxes come in a variety of sizes and materials. They’re handy for storing outdoor pillows and blankets, toys and sporting equipment, or even your most-used garden supplies. If you have a pool, a storage box is the perfect place to keep pool toys and cleaning supplies. Storage boxes are often kept on the deck or patio, and some of them can double as extra seating.

Outdoor Storage Sheds

If you have the space in your yard, consider an outdoor storage shed. If you’re currently using your garage or your basement to store items like your tools or lawn mower, you’re going to love having an outdoor storage shed. The convenience of having an outdoor shed can’t be beat, and you can set them up so everything is organized how you like it. Sam’s Club has storage sheds in wood as well as vinyl and plastic/resin. Many storage boxes and most storage sheds can be locked, so your items will stay safe and protected.

Sours: https://www.samsclub.com/b/sheds-outdoor-storage/1887


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