Metalcore 2020

Metalcore 2020 DEFAULT
Top 10 future metalcore bands, Top 10 Future Of Metalcore Bands, Top 10 bands who are the future of metalcore, Top 10 metalcore bands in 2018, top 10 metalcore singles in 2018, metalcore bands, metalcore songs, metalcore albums, progressive metalcore, post-hardcore, Anthony Talanca, sickandsound, Modern Error, Modern Error – Blackout Poetry, Inventure, Inventure - Creations of Chaos, Bnaks Arcade, Banks Arcade – Ambition, The Parallel, The Parallel – Monochrome, Horcrux, Horcrux - Live Through Me, Pridelands, Pridelands - Any Colour You Desire, The Afterimage, The Afterimage – Cerulean, Thornhill, Thornhill – Reptile, Shields, Shields - It’s Killing Me, Convictions, Convictions – Voices, Long Branch Records, KINDA agency, InVogue Records, UNFD, Dreambound, DK Records, Tragic Hero Records, metalcore songs selection, metalcore bands selection, nu metalcore, melodic metalcore

Top 10 Future Of Metalcore Bands.

 

 

 

An article by Anthony Talanca

 

 

 

Every year while listening to music, I come across certain bands that make me think, “Wow, they could be the future of metalcore music.” There are a lot of elements that go into making a band good. There has to be strong musicianship throughout the band and the lyrics and style have to draw me in. They don’t have to try to reinvent the wheel and be the most creative band out there, but a breakout band must bring something special to the table.

 

 

 

 

If I were doing this last year, the two bands that would respectively be one and two on my list would have been Currents and Polaris. Flash forward a year or so now, and these two bands have started to take over the scene. They are no longer the “future,” but rather the “now” of metalcore.

 

Without further ado, here are ten bands I believe have what it takes to become the future of metalcore music in this scene. A lot of these bands may be unfamiliar to many, but they could easily be the next big band you are talking about.

 

 

 

1. Modern Error

 

 

 

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Watch the official video for Modern Error – Blackout Poetry:

 

 

 

 

 

9. Inventure

 

 

 
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Inventure, a band out New Jersey, checks in at number nine on thislist. As soon as the song started, I was drawn in by the bouncy, djenty riff right into a thundering screaming section. As the song develops, Inventure presents a very catchy, bridge chorus that honestly reminds me a little bit of the clean singing in the band Sylar. However, the song comes right back into the progressive metalcore spectrum with another hammering verse. The song does a great job at being heavy and then getting a little melodic to show off the bands ability to equip different elements at once. Inventure is starting to make a little noise in the New Jersey scene as fellow Jersey band, Lorna Shore, was hyping them up on their social media accounts. Having grown up in New Jersey, there are a ton of awesome, intimate venues in the area. Getting Inventure on the bill with a band like Lorna Shore or Old Wounds could give them the hype they need to blow out in terms of popularity. They having a new album, Sociopath, coming out on May 22nd, 2018 and I definitely recommend that you check it out.

 

Watch the official video for Inventure – Creations of Chaos:

 

 

 

 

 

8. Banks Arcade

 

 

 

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Watch the official video for Banks Arcade – Ambition:

 

 

 

 

7. The Parallel

 

 

 
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The Parallel, a band out of Canada, checks in at number seven on this list. As soon as they were signed to InVogue Records, I immediately checked them out, as InVogue is one of my favorite labels. Monochrome is the second single released off an album coming out this year, and I am so excited for this release. The Parallel have a crazy intricate sound to them, and it is absolute structured chaos. Another comparison I do not like to throw around much, but works here, is that The Parallel has Oceans Ate Alaska ability. Oceans Ate Alaska are insane musicians, and you see the same ability with this band. In this song, they have three different members of the band have vocal parts. They can all sing and they can all scream, which presents a ton of awesome elements to the song. At one second, there is clean singing, and the next; all hell breaks loose with a ridiculous guitar section backed by insane vocals. They do not follow any type of specified song structure, and that is what makes them so good. Being able to get on a tour with a band like Oceans Ate Alaska or Counterparts is something I think could bring this band to the top. Once this album drops, you can almost immediately pencil it in as a top 10 album of the year for me.

 

Watch the official video for The Parallel – Monochrome:

 

 

 

 

 

6. Horcrux

 

 

 

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Watch the official video for Horcrux – Live Through Me:

 

 

 

 

 

5. Pridelands

 

 

 
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Pridelands, a band out of Australia, check in at number five on this list. They are actually a band I just did a review for, giving their new EP, Any Colour You Desire, a 9 out of 10 overall. In this song, we get that raspy screaming section that reminds me a lot of Sean from Make Them Suffer. However, the biggest thing I talk about that makes this band excellent is their clean singing ability. Josh has arena rock vocals; they are so powerful and capture the moment of the song. The blend of the screaming and singing work so well together and give Pridelands such a refreshing sound in this genre. The whole EP is extremely catchy, and I definitely recommend that you check it out. As a young Australian band, the dream is obviously to tour with Northlane, but being able to get on a tour with other popular bands such as Make Them Suffer or Polaris could give them the hype needed to become a household name. The potential is seriously off the roof for these guys.

 

Watch the official video for Pridelands – Any Colour You Desire:

 

 

 

 

 

4. The Afterimage

 

 

 
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The Afterimage, another band out of Canada, checks in at number four on this list. Out of all bands already listed, The Afterimage is probably the most recognizable to a lot of fans here. They have previous work out, and it drew a ton of praise amongst fans. However, the long period between new music presented other bands the chance to jump to the top of the scene, making The Afterimage a forgotten band to some. However, with the first single, Cerulean, the band reminded many of the powerhouse they are. They are another band that does have some Oceans Ate Alaska elements to them, as there are a ton of layered elements to the song. The screaming is really interesting backed with really harmonious singing that creates a great blend. The lead singer being able to do both the screaming and singing with that voice just seems unfair. His range is absolutely incredible, to put it simply. The Afterimage has a new album, Eve, coming out on May 18th, and it is another I fully expect to make my top 10 of 2018. Oceans Ate Alaska picking these guys up on a tour could present them a lot of newfound fame. I would absolutely love An Afterimage and The Parallel tour near me. These guys just need to hit touring hard and they have the chance to blow up and stay in the mind of metalcore fans.

 

Watch the official video for The Afterimage – Cerulean:

 

 

 

 

 

3. Thornhill

 

 

 
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Thornhill, a band of out Australia, checks in at number three on this list. Upon my first listen of their 2018 EP, Butterfly, I knew this was a band that has immense song writing ability and talent. They have that awesome progressive metalcore sound that incorporates a ton of atmospheric sounds and riffs. The lead singer Jacob has such an awesome variety to his voice, as he is able tosmash the choruses on this album and always still be able to hammer home his screaming vocals. Being signed to UNFD has given Thornhill a great opportunity to really explode in terms of popularity. Reddit’s metalcore page loves these guys, and so do I. If I had to predict, Thornhill will be the next international band to have the “Polaris jump into fame” moment, and they will become a huge hit in the scene. They are already starting to tour with some big bands in Australia, so the next step to me seems to be to get to tour in the United States. Polaris has hinted that they are coming to the US very soon, and could you imagine if they brought Thornhill with them? That would be incredible.

 

Watch the official video for Thornhill – Reptile:

 

 

 

 

2. Shields

 

 

 
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Shields, a band out of the United Kingdom, checks in at number two on this list. Shields was a band that I had briefly heard of, but actually came to know of in a different way. Ice Nine Kills is one of my favorite bands, and their single, Enjoy Your Slay, features a member of Shields. The feature on the song was great and got me interested in the band. So having them in the back of my mind had me interested for this 2018 album release, Life In Exile. It’s Killing Me brings a lot of different elements to the table. The lead screamer has a really interesting delivery and tone, as it’s another kind of raspy sound. It works really well because between that and the catchy singing chorus, it really blends and works together well. Shields is singed to Long Branch Records, a record label that I think does a really good job at identifying and promoting talented bands. They, along with Thornhill, have been getting a lot of Reddit metalcore hype, and they definitely deserve it. Life In Exile is an album I thought could be good going into it, and now, without a doubt has a spot in my top 10 albums of 2018. Shields is great at what they do and they are going to become huge. They have been starting to get booked on bigger tours now, but getting a tour with Ice Nine Kills would be epic for both bands. They both feature their singers on songs and getting to hear that live would make for an incredible experience.

 

Watch the official video for Shields– It’s Killing Me:

 

 

 

 

1. Convictions

 

 

 
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Convictions, a band out of Ohio, checks in at number one on this list. It would not be a list of bands that I think should be huge if I did not include Convictions. I absolutely love these guys, and they have all the potential in the world. They are signed to InVogue Records and have a new album, Hope For The Broken, out on June 1st, 2018. Voices is the first single off the new album, and it is extremely catchy and brings a lot of awesome new elements to the band. For example, the lead screamer, Mike, shows off some clean vocal singing for his first time in the band. Convictions released a song that shows off their devoted faith in such a catchy setting. It is the heavy you expect in a Convictions song, and has the awesome choruses from John that you come to love from this band. They released my top album of 2016 in I Will Become, and this album has all the making to be another hit. They’ve toured with bands such as Like Moths To Flames, who cannot say enough good things about them. They are currently on tour with Upon A Burning Body, Volumes, and The White Noise, marking this as one of their biggest tours to date. All of their work is powerful and marked by their belief in faith, and they absolutely nail it. Selfishly, I would love to see Convictions tour with Fit For A King and/or Underoath, but these guys are so close to blowing up in this scene. Having seen them over five times live now, nobody in this scene works harder at perfecting their craft. They deserve every part of this number one nomination from me. 

 

Watch the official video for Convictions – Voices:

 

 

 

 

 

Anthony Talanca

 

 

 

I am very proud to host this article on Top 10 songs and bands who are the future of metalcore by our Senior Editor and Live Reporter Anthony Talanca who is also our metalcore savvy. To find out more about Anthony, sneak peek into his music background and bio at:

www.sickandsound.it/meet-my-editors

 

 

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7. Lune, “Ghost”

“Ghost” is the most face-contorting track on this list. The guitars sound like their strings are made from industrial cables, so low that the human ear is probably a subpar vehicle through which to hear them. They alternate cleverly from Djenting to simpler passages, snowballing into oblivion. And that’s when the magic happens: “Ghost” sets one up for a mirthless, speedy breakdown and then completely pulls out the rug. Lune chooses the least reasonable approach — slowing down and simply wallowing in the distortion. The shock of this moment, despite how often I listen to “Ghost,” always gets to me.

6. Spiritbox, “Holy Roller”

“Holy Roller” is probably the most frightening song of 2020. Despite being a departure from the typically intricate songwriting of Spiritbox, it’s a demonstration of their sheer chutzpah. Spiritbox’s tools on the track are crude and effective: ghostly ambience, a techno-chanted chorus and a muscular rhythm section. It’s so straightforward that it’s almost humorous. And yet, for all of the obvious avenues it takes, “Holy Roller” is beyond refreshing. Vocalist Courtney Laplante’s screams are inimitable and have never shone so brutally on a Spiritbox song before. Though “Holy Roller” is not as progressive as the band’s EP, Singles Collection, it doesn’t need to be.

5. Phoebe Bridgers, “I Know the End”

Now, I know what you’re thinking: Why isn’t this song higher on the list? The truth is, it’s uncanny how heavy “I Know the End” actually is. Sure, much of its bludgeoning power comes as a surprise. While initially a quiet song, its extended instrumental build-up is something like happy incineration. Not exactly morbid, but patiently feral and oh-such-a-sternum-punch at its climax. One guttural scream. A darker melody and crashing drum symbols. More screaming. Jaws hitting, hitting the floor. (Not part of the song, but the audience. Namely, me). Bridgers’s heavy breath simply reverberating in the air to close Punisher. It’s a sonic riptide.

4. Veil of Maya, “Outsider”

Of all the songs on this list, Veil of Maya’s “Outsider” most explicitly tackles the COVID-19 crisis. Its album art is a disturbing, sickly green cloud swirling its way into a blue globe. The track itself is a fitting encapsulation of what living in a global pandemic can feel like: a creeping sense of emotional dread mirroring the physical manifestations of sickness. “Outsider” offers some of the band’s most groovy, Djenting, show-stopping orchestral moments, and even more proof that Veil of Maya’s strength is in writing melody better than anyone else can. It is an example of well-rounded, god-tier songwriting that only seems to be improving with time.

3. Make Them Suffer, “How to Survive a Funeral”

Picking a single track to highlight from Make Them Suffer’s 2020 masterpiece How to Survive a Funeral is impossible. I settled on the title track because it was the one that happened to be stuck in my head this particular morning. The track is clean vocalist and keyboardist Booka Nile’s strongest chorus on the whole album. “You barely knew us / You were out of touch / Out of touch for so long,” she sings over a warm piano melody and distant screaming. I never quite know where the emotional beats of the song land: certainly melancholic, but inexplicably warm and empathic as well. And while Nile’s notes are often too high for most to sing along to, she makes them grounded and sweet here. I’m not going to pretend that I completely understand the murky ambiguity of “How to Survive a Funeral.” But the song is always teaching me more.

2. Loathe, “Screaming”

A narrow but honest interpretation of Loathe’s I Let It in and It Took Everything is that for the first time in over 20 years, a band besides Deftones can fulfillingly sound like Deftones. Of course, the album is so much more than that. But with “Screaming,” Loathe elevates this particular notion to its height —  they can do Deftones better than Deftones can. Vocalist Kadeem France puts out some of his most sentimental croons here, though the extent of his talents lurks elsewhere in the record. The rhythm guitar riffs in the song are haunting and melodic without sacrificing a modicum of heaviness. The final minute of “Screaming” is more than just seismically complex. It’s a finale that effortlessly conceals its own intricacies and rewards an eager ear.

1. ERRA, “Snowblood”

ERRA’s departure from Sumerian Records was a welcome one. The news would have been exciting in and of itself, but it was merely the cherry on top of the scrumptious sundae of their August 2020 single “Snowblood.” The track packs enough breakdowns, screams, cleans, animal drumming, soloing and sheer whopping riffage into its curt four minutes and 14 seconds to fill all of 2020. It’s the kind of wonder that makes me do a double take every listen. “Crawling out of the crypt to bleed the living dry / In this fantasy, the villains win, the heroes die,” JT Cavey bellows. I can’t help but grin, grimace, explode every listen.

For a compilation of all of the songs mentioned above, check out this playlist on Spotify.

Daily Film Beat Editor Anish Tamhaney can be reached at [email protected]

Sours: https://www.michigandaily.com/music/best-metalcore-songs-2020/
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Scarlet Dragged Under Tallah October Ends

This year, blessing show-deprived fans with longer releases was a much-needed effort. And metalcore bands made far-reaching full-length debuts. They opened a new era by bringing it back to hardcore punk, putting a fresh spin on the golden years or shaking it up with contemporary influences.

Here are 20 metalcore debuts from 2020 that are totally worth your time. Did any of these slip under your radar? Check out the records below and shout out your favorite in the comments!

Read more: The 50 best albums of 2020 in alternative, pop punk, metal and beyond

Tallah – Matriphagy

Just a fun bedtime story about trying to put a bloody end to a childhood trauma. And it’s brought to you by strategically random chaos. It stars the SlipknotSnare™, about a thousand screaming, rapping, pig-squealing and growling manic emo personalities, featuring deathcore, turntable scratching, blast beats, technical guitar solos, Korn, haunting hooks, dynamic nuance, bounce riffs and your mom (duh). Feeling lost? Confused? It’s OK. Being hardworking digital-era content creators, Tallah made sure it’s easy to fall down the rabbit hole of layers of Matriphagy. The concept series will help hunt down Easter eggs (or gutted bunnies) in videos. And Max Portnoy’s drum playthroughs, Justin Bonitz’s vocal videos, Andrew Cooper‘s bass and Derrick Schneider’s guitar playthroughs are pretty damn awesome, too.

Hollow Front – Loose Threads

Since their inception four years ago, Hollow Front were the band everyone were rooting for to blow up. And now they officially made it by joining UNFD. But their tight melodic instrumentals, balanced out with chugging riffs and djent-y breakdowns, Tyler Tate’s heartfelt screams, Dakota Alvarez’s show-stopping singing parts and relatable emotional lyrics were generating millions of views and streams way before they signed the label. It’s all-around dynamic metalcore perfection. And Loose Threads sets a new melodic metalcore standard for years to come.

DRAIN – California Cursed

We started thinking crossover has been played out by this point (or a couple of decades ago). But DRAIN kicked down the door of metalcore’s current time capsule. They made a smashing entrance with a fresh, passionate and unexpectedly structured upgrade to the retro thrash-metalcore fusion. California Cursed’s sleek production brings out the alertness in crunchy riffs, crisp snares and high-pitched scream commands. In turn, it makes the groovy lower-register action impossible to not headbang to.

Gulch – Impenetrable Cerebral Fortress

Creative ways to emulate gigs, such as livestreams and VR concerts, became an essential way for bands to connect with fans in the “new normal.” Gulch geeked out with sound design. They put listeners in a raw sonic space where crunchy riffs, drum attacks and rough vocals feel almost physically real. Jack Shirley, who’s known for giving life to sonic characters as diverse as Deafheaven and Remo Drive, produced Impenetrable Cerebral Fortress. And it convinces us that there is no cerebral fortress this onslaught of high-voltage hardcore punk and death-metal brutality would fail to penetrate and flood with circle-pit levels of adrenaline.

Ghøstkid – GHØSTKID

Freshly out of Eskimo Callboy, Sebastian “Sushi” Biesler made an entrance to the dark side as Ghøstkid. His hard-hitting and extremely entertaining debut LP shows that leaving the German’s trancecore group was a career-defining move. Backed by his new band and radically supportive fans, Sushi dropped GHØSTKID on Friday the 13th of November. It’s a dynamic, alt-metal, industrial, nü-metal and electropop-flavored take on metalcore. He’s metalcore’s YUNGBLUD personality-wise, a close relative of Oli Sykes and a distant cousin of the Marilyn Manson/Ghostemane family tree creatively. And Ghøstkid will be an exciting phenomenon to track in the rapidly progressing scene during a new decade.

October Ends – Zodiac

The album art screams Architects. Which is a nice reference considering U.K.’s up-and-coming metalcore unit play into a similar type of dreamy vs. extreme type of duality. October Ends’ vocals are also dual. The two vocalists’ range spans from dramatic reverbed screams to deep growls, raps and iridescent clean singing. Zodiac gives a kaleidoscopic view of different metalcore eras as it embraces melodic metalcore legacy with stunning lead guitar runs such as those opening “Resilience 鼡.” The record takes it all the way to contemporary influences such as trap beats and freshly revived nü-metal chugs and scratches. While also going heavy on the djent-y Architects bounce, of course. The lead single “Bury Me Under 豭” says it all. And here’s the reaction it deserves.

END – Splinters From An Ever-Changing Face

The debut full-length from members of Counterpartsand Fit For An Autopsy is the sonic equivalent of getting your head stuck in a beehive. And then you fall down a cliff while going through all the emotional stages that would come with such experience. Gulchlabelmates from Closed Casket Activities, END instantly absorb you into a claustrophobic chaos of buzzing guitars, manic drum patterns and terrorizing screams contemplating existential dread.

Dragged Under – The World Is In Your Way

If consistency between tracks and style uniformity is what you’re looking for in an album, you should skip to the next one. The World Is In Your Way is a hot mess. More than anything, the full-length debut by Dragged Under sounds like a dream playlist made by a 2000s scene kid. There’s some melodic deathcore, pop punk, some post-hardcore and then some nü metal and Foo Fighters to listen to when no one’s around. But it’s 2020, and the kid is all grown up, has a beautiful beard and a YouTube channel called Riffs, Beards & Gear. And he lowkey has a band who already toured with the Used.

Downswing – Good Intentions

Allowing New York hardcore punk to perform the lead role, Downswing also create elaborate supporting characters of crossover and progressive metal on Good Intentions. Outbursts of intensity get balanced out with melodic takes, where Brett Colvin’s emotional clean vocals give an awesome contrast to his raspy shouting old-school hardcore style.

Glass Tides – In Between

Glass TidesSpotify bio goes, “Glass Tides. Emo. Passion.” And that’s exactly what In Between entails. To be more specific, Glass Tides play with a bunch of different genres. They come in waves of post-hardcore, emo, metalcore, alt-rock, post-punk, pop punk and shoegaze. It makes the dynamic body of In Between a refreshing listen in between all the heavy stuff. Oh, and the lyrics and most of the vocals here are 100% emo, by the way.

SCARLET – Obey The Queen

On Obey The Queen, SCARLET spits fire on misogynist ugly fuckers. And she threatens the Zodiac killer like the “#bossbitch” she is. Metalcore isn’t the first scene that comes to mind when thinking about female empowerment. But Sweden’s SCARLET is a loud new (and nü) voice who makes the same point that Ashnikko, Rico Nasty, Nova Twins or the Buttress make in their genres. SCARLET’s debut attacks with nü-metal-supercharged, industrialized metalcore. There are nods to Scandinavian atmospheric metal tradition. She charms with pop appeal as her chameleonic vocals scream, rap, shout, whisper in creepy baby voices. And she impresses with control and range in these anthemic rock power ballads.

Blueshift – Voyager

Members of the R/Metalcore community, the internet’s best resource of the latest metalcore hype, left a generous amount of praise for this one. It’s all in the discussion titled “If you like ERRA.. listen to Blueshift and their new album Voyager!” User u/Twinningspree859 is absolutely right. Even if you’re not an ERRA stan, Blueshift’s futuristic explorations of progressive, atmospheric and djent terrains with polished instrumentals and raw vocals on Voyager are worth checking out, both in the original and the instrumental modes. Also, both albums make a great intro for their latest single, “Rain.” Yes, 2020 was extremely productive for some people.

Mikau – Phantoma

On their Phantoma, Mikau take the basic song structures of melodic metalcore. Then they build a vibrant neon city with a turbulent mix of trance/Nintendocore on top of them. But it’s not the dynamic interplay of breakdowns, keyboards and synths that truly make the album stand out. It’s the added dimension of raw and emotional screamo/post-hardcore-echoing vocals. They give a heart and a soul of a living creature to the mix.

Viscera – Obsidian

Like a robotic moth, a glistening guitar solo flies out of a gentle piano interlude. It dives right into dark deathcore flames and arises in the form of an atmospheric dragon with shiny metal wings. All of this drama fits into the first seconds of Obsidian, and twists and turns happen at meteoric speed in Viscera’s majestic thrash-death-math-black-power metalcore realm. Also, it’s laced with demonic vocals and glitchy chuggs.

Year Of The Knife – Internal Incarceration

Internal Incarceration is an ominous explosion of straight-edge hardcore laced with brutal death metal. Converge’s Kurt Ballou, the mastermind behind the sound design of Code Orange and Nails, produced the project, too. A pretty decent setup for a debut LP, huh? Year Of The Knife’s uncompromised and multifaceted compositions received the treatment they deserved. Also, every instrumental layer is transparent and hits in full force, from crunchy guitars to chunky bass to manic drums and infernal screams. This is a band to watch in 2021 and, hopefully, far beyond.

Omerta – Hyperviolence

The hysterical cover art of hyperpop’sevil brother is a scientifically accurate depiction of Omerta’s first-ever mini-LP, Hyperviolence. If this visualization raises more questions than it gives answers, picture this: a glitching lo-fi Pennywise hologram is holding a magic hat and keeps pulling out every 2000s nü-metal and deathcore cliche imaginable, in random order and 10 times faster than your brain’s processing speed. As your jaw drops, a dangerous dose of down-tuned chug riffs, blast beats, panic chords, technical solos, heavy breakdowns, manic screams, melodic hooks and cringy raps get shoved right down your throat. Your common sense is telling you to stop. But you keep eating it up because it tastes so damn good. Also, it all this comes to an unexpected end in 19 minutes. You’ll likely clap your hands with the excitement of a 5-year-old and shout out “Again!”

Darko US – Pt. 1 Dethmask

It’s already apparent in the track length. But Pt. 1 Dethmask is, indeed, a 14-minute short tornado of down-tuned, intense, growling, blast-beating, screaming and pig-squealing deathcore. Still, Darko US’ debut packs a more nutritious set of ingredients than your everyday lunch-break deathcore. Can it get any darker? Yes. Can it get any heavier? Yes. How? Djent. Also, nü metal. Bon appétit.

Saving Vice – Hello There

Well hello, one more freaky character in the vocal-duo game and a quality addition to the present-day melodic metalcore bunch. A little scene, a little post-hardcore, super catchy and melodic to its core, Saving Vice create a beautifully flowing dark veil with clean vocals, keyboards and symphonic samples. Before you get too caught up in it, they pierce the delicate fabric with chopped riffs on Hello There. They do the same with breakdowns and dissonant chugs. It’s a simple yet effective formula to summon the ghost of a Myspacemetalcore kid and make them dance.

Cadaverette – A Farewell To Earthly Existence

Cadaverette is an underground gem of sludge-metal-expanded hardcore. And they made an enchanting debut with A Farewell To Earthly Existence. It’s a dark, dense and noisy horror fairy tale. And it’s told by a little girl singing, a hardcore punk frontwoman shouting and a metal singer screaming. The instrumentals take her on a suspenseful trip of constantly shifting moods, pace and intensity.  

Devil In The Details – The Hell You Wanted

Devil In The Details’ full-length debut is a 10-track release of passionate feel-better-core. There’s the perfect dose of anthemic hooks, melodies, bounce riffs, screams and relatable rage/melancholy emotional scale for the shitshow that was 2020. Also, as DITD say, they aim to create “a safe haven” for their fans and make them feel like they’re not alone. So save The Hell You Wanted as your go-to metalcore emotional support animal in quarantine when you need one.

Giedre Matulaityte

Sours: https://www.altpress.com/features/metalcore-debut-albums-2020/
R e s u r g e n c e - A Metalcore Mix 2020
best metalcore songs 2020

In modern metalcore, the generic breakdown as we know it seems to be close to extinction. But the way you recognize a good one remains unchanged—it’s when you sense the ultimate release of anticipation approaching, yet it still catches you by surprise.

Hold your breath and get ready to headbang to some of the best breakdowns in 2020 so far.

Read more: Did Slipknot accidentally confirm Tortilla Man’s identity with new merch?

Code Orange – “Swallowing The Rabbit Whole”

Code Orange’s Underneath is a transgressive masterpiece that cuts through multiple sound and style realms. And so is “Swallowing The Rabbit Whole,” a loopy and mind-boggling synthesis of thrash-metal drive, progressive riffs, djenty groove and industrial harshness. A supercharged, glitchy breakdown erupts roughly one minute before the end of the track, mirroring and deconstructing the dominant riff. The breakdown marks a temporary closure to the whole only to rise again, like a futuristic mechanical phoenix, at the start of the following song.

Polaris – “Pray For Rain”

Beauty lies in simplicity. Right? Sometimes. But how about musicians who are able to create the most complex material and make it sound free-flowing and simple? That’s the kind of extraordinary beauty that shines in the breakdown in “Pray For Rain.” Here, Polaris handle syncopated rhythms and radiantly embellished guitar layers with an almost easycore approach. This sets the tone for The Death Of Me—melancholic yet persistent with a vividly expressed constant of light.

Sharptooth – “153”

A high-energy, hardcore punk-leaning feminist power anthem, “153” is a true standout on Sharptooth’s latest album Transitional Forms. Storming toward the peak point with fast riffs and Lauren Kashan’s heavy metal-esque clean vocals, the track takes an unexpected turn at the second half. Kashan’s gradually angrier singing changes into a prolonged scream as the tempo abruptly drops and fast guitar riffs get transformed into unsettling high-pitched squeals. With that comes a heavy, chugging breakdown—both the ending point and the culmination of the track.

Pressure Cracks – “Big T Youth”

Whether it’s fast-as-hell hardcore punk, forward-rushing thrashy riffing or melodic passages, Pressure Cracks have the unique ability to tear all of that apart when you least expect it. “Big T Youth,” the closing track on their This Is Called Survival EP, is an excellent instance of that. The breakdown comes early in the track, allowing Jason Aalon Butler to push his outrageous vocal performance to the edge. Later on, primed by prebreakdown callout moments or pauses, you might expect another breakdown to happen. But things just keep moving forward.

Spiritbox – “Blessed Be”

In “Blessed Be,” Spiritboxsmoothly traverse from one emotional note to another. The single opens with grand djenty riffs only to be replaced by synth atmospheres and a melodic, progressive theme with Courtney LaPlante’s enchanting clean singing. Later on, the atmosphere thickens, followed by a slowdown that interrupts the poppy flow of the song and clears the stage for a massive, dissonant breakdown layered with growls and screams. And then, completely unexpectedly, the melodic chorus returns like nothing even happened.

END – “Absence”

Ready for some black metal…core? Well, ready or not, END are here to arrest your mind with electric blast beats and ghostly screams in “Absence.” Soon enough, though, the supergroup ditch the bleak vibe and proceed with metallic hardcore-punk style, as if it was as easy as flipping a coin. This duality is crowned with a dense and majestic closing breakdown that will make you go back to the start of the track to figure out how they got there in three-and-a-half minutes.

Crystal Lake – “Disobey”

If you have a thing for jaw-dropping opening riffs, you might entirely lose yours for the one on “Disobey” by Crystal Lake. And then lose it again when the two-folded breakdown, essentially a transformed, inverted version of that riff, comes right after the command “Disobey!” and proceeds with a rapid scream blast beat exchange. Before you realize what just happened, you’ll find yourself in a pitch-black ambiance of mumbled chants, scattered screams and doomy guitars.

Make Them Suffer – “Bones”

Speaking of show-stopping opening riffs, the one in “Bones” from Make Them Suffer will automatically make your head nod as your lip corners go as low as they physically can. Transformed, remolded and reimagined, the riff will continue reappearing throughout the track and make you forget a breakdown is even supposed to come. But it does, as a momentary yet powerful detour that makes the final entrance of the chorus even more dramatic.

Loathe – “New Faces In The Dark”

It’s harder than metalcore itself to pick one breakdown from Loathe’s I Let It In And It Took Everything. But even if you have the album playing in the background, the breakdown in “New Faces In The Dark” will have you pause whatever you’re doing. Interchangeably groovy and melodic, the track reaches its climactic point when its djenty theme is broken down into a piercing and noisy industrial-like pattern.

156/Silence – “Conflict Of Interest”

Did someone just turn on the fire alarm? Nope, it’s the breakdown in the seventh track on 156/Silence’s Irrational Pull, an album that challenges a broad spectrum of genres, from math to post-hardcore to groovy deathcore. So does “Conflict Of Interest,” where straightforward riffs and melodic hooks that lead up to the alarming breakdown make it truly shine in all its heaviness. This might not be the most technical section on the record, but it’s surely the most fun.

Volumes – “holywater”

If you like your breakdowns technical, glitchy and synth-heavy, “holywater” will make your day (or night). With this track, Volumes announced the return of vocalist Michael Barr, who defined “holywater” as “a new chapter.” And it sure sounds so until the last section of the song, where only a suspenseful synth lead—the uppermost layer of the djenty breakdown—is left to end the track, like a sonic question mark. What a cliffhanger.

Lotus Eater – “Narco”

If you’re not into conventional song structures or predictable breakdown placements, congratulations. You’re in the right place at the right time. “Narco,” the latest single from Lotus Eater, shows their flawless ability to manipulate expectations as they’re putting contrasting segments together and don’t shy away from pauses in between sections of haste. This dissonant breakdown will catch you by surprise, and so will what comes after.

Earthshatter – “W.T.M.”

While utilizing the full potential of crisp, grinding guitars, rough screams, sore basslines and aggressive drum patterns, Earthshatter still manage to place a super-sweet chorus here and there in “W.T.M.” You know, to distribute the chaos in small and healthy portions. But that’s just until the first breakdown, which tears the poor chorus to shreds. It’s followed by the second breakdown, which mercilessly destroys the first one, only to be eaten up by the third and final one—a slow but deathcore-heavy monstrosity.

Bring Me The Horizon – “Parasite Eve”

In “Parasite Eve,” Bring Me The Horizon continue toying with both a range of styles and the expectations of fans. The pandemic-themed, contrast-driven single unites a freshly cool again combination of alt-metal and nü metal in an electro-heavy way. But more than anything, it’s the second half of the track that teases the prospect of the band heading toward a heavier direction again as it echoes their metalcore past in a way that is enriched with the freedom and experimentation of their 2019 releases. The breakdown is brief yet effective enough to feed the hope of BMTH revisiting metalcore on BMTH8.

August Burns Red – “Dismembered Memory”

Throughout their nearly two-decade-long career, August Burns Redhave mastered the perfect formula for a great breakdown, both in terms of placement and the breakdown itself. First, they throw in a continuous thread of melody that you can rely on to keep things in place while the band dazzle you with their virtuosic techniques. The breakdown comes in exactly when you’re expecting it to, but it’s still utterly satisfying. Click play on “Dismembered Memory” to witness for yourself.

Giedre Matulaityte

Sours: https://www.altpress.com/features/best-metalcore-songs-2020/

2020 metalcore

And tomorrow I'm waiting for you. I'll be back here in the morning. And again a gentle, a little sad kiss.

Best Metalcore Songs of 2020

Me too, - she smiled a childish bewildered smile. I, probably, at that moment smiled like a big donkey. Are we neighbors. I thought. "She probably lives on a floor higher or lower.

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A thin reed, with an incredibly flexible body. Knowing the value of her face and body. Even at the institute, she realized that she had one perspective.



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