Monotouch dialogviewcontroller

Monotouch dialogviewcontroller DEFAULT

Pushing a DialogViewController onto a ViewController onto NavigationController stack gives 2 pages

I fixed it in the following way:

I created a custom class for my TableViewController (containing a TableView with static cells):

Here is the code for the TableViewDelegate:

I override the RowSelected method in the tableview delegate class and check if the currently selected row equals index 2, the index of the TableViewCell I want to have show my MonoTouch DialogViewController (called AccountDialogViewController). If true, I push a new instance of my AccountDialogViewController onto the navigation stack via the NavigationController property of the parent TableViewController passed in through the constructor.

Here is my AccountDialogViewController:

So, there it is. No more weird blank screens :-)

answered Feb 26 '15 at 9:56

CorstiaanCorstiaan

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Sours: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/28707216/pushing-a-dialogviewcontroller-onto-a-viewcontroller-onto-navigationcontroller-s
//// DialogViewController.cs: drives MonoTouch.Dialog//// Author:// Miguel de Icaza////usingSystem;usingSystem.Collections.Generic;usingFoundation;usingUIKit;usingCoreGraphics;usingNSAction=global::System.Action;namespaceMonoTouch.Dialog{/// <summary>/// The DialogViewController is the main entry point to use MonoTouch.Dialog,/// it provides a simplified API to the UITableViewController./// </summary>publicclassDialogViewController : UITableViewController {publicUITableViewStyleStyle=UITableViewStyle.Grouped;publiceventAction<NSIndexPath> OnSelection;#if!__TVOS__UISearchBarsearchBar;#endifUITableViewtableView;RootElementroot;boolpushing;booldirty;boolreloading;/// <summary>/// The root element displayed by the DialogViewController, the value can be changed during runtime to update the contents./// </summary>publicRootElementRoot {get {returnroot; }set {if (root==value)return;if (root!=null)root.Dispose ();root=value;root.TableView=tableView; ReloadData (); } } EventHandlerrefreshRequested;/// <summary>/// If you assign a handler to this event before the view is shown, the/// DialogViewController will have support for pull-to-refresh UI./// </summary>publiceventEventHandlerRefreshRequested {add {if (tableView!=null)thrownewArgumentException ("You should set the handler before the controller is shown");refreshRequested+=value; }remove {refreshRequested-=value; } }// If the value is true, we are enabled, used in the source for quick computationboolenableSearch;publicboolEnableSearch {get {returnenableSearch; }set {if (enableSearch==value)return;// After MonoTouch 3.0, we can allow for the search to be enabled/disableif (tableView!=null)thrownewArgumentException ("You should set EnableSearch before the controller is shown");enableSearch=value; } }// If set, we automatically scroll the content to avoid showing the search bar until // the user manually pulls it down.publicboolAutoHideSearch { get; set; }publicstringSearchPlaceholder { get; set; }/// <summary>/// Invoke this method to trigger a data refresh. /// </summary>/// <remarks>/// This will invoke the RerfeshRequested event handler, the code attached to it/// should start the background operation to fetch the data and when it completes/// it should call ReloadComplete to restore the control state./// </remarks>publicvoidTriggerRefresh () {TriggerRefresh (false); }voidTriggerRefresh (boolshowStatus) {if (refreshRequested==null)return;if (reloading)return;reloading=true;refreshRequested (this, EventArgs.Empty); }/// <summary>/// Invoke this method to signal that a reload has completed, this will update the UI accordingly./// </summary>publicvoidReloadComplete () {if (!reloading)return;reloading=false;#if!__TVOS__RefreshControl.EndRefreshing ();#endif }/// <summary>/// Controls whether the DialogViewController should auto rotate/// </summary>publicboolAutorotate { get; set; }#if!__TVOS__publicoverrideboolShouldAutorotateToInterfaceOrientation (UIInterfaceOrientationtoInterfaceOrientation) {returnAutorotate||toInterfaceOrientation==UIInterfaceOrientation.Portrait; }publicoverridevoidDidRotate (UIInterfaceOrientationfromInterfaceOrientation) {base.DidRotate (fromInterfaceOrientation);//Fixes the RefreshView's size if it is shown during rotationReloadData (); }#endifSection [] originalSections;Element [][] originalElements;/// <summary>/// Allows caller to programatically activate the search bar and start the search process/// </summary>publicvoidStartSearch () {if (originalSections!=null)return;#if!__TVOS__searchBar.BecomeFirstResponder ();#endiforiginalSections=Root.Sections.ToArray ();originalElements=newElement [originalSections.Length][];for (inti=0; i<originalSections.Length; i++)originalElements [i] =originalSections [i].Elements.ToArray (); }/// <summary>/// Allows the caller to programatically stop searching./// </summary>publicvirtualvoidFinishSearch () {if (originalSections==null)return;Root.Sections=newList<Section> (originalSections);originalSections=null;originalElements=null;#if!__TVOS__searchBar.ResignFirstResponder ();#endifReloadData (); }publicdelegatevoidSearchTextEventHandler (objectsender, SearchChangedEventArgsargs);publiceventSearchTextEventHandlerSearchTextChanged;publicvirtualvoidOnSearchTextChanged (stringtext) {if (SearchTextChanged!=null)SearchTextChanged (this, newSearchChangedEventArgs (text)); }publicvoidPerformFilter (stringtext) {if (originalSections==null)return;OnSearchTextChanged (text);varnewSections=newList<Section> ();for (intsidx=0; sidx<originalSections.Length; sidx++){SectionnewSection=null;varsection=originalSections [sidx];Element [] elements=originalElements [sidx];for (inteidx=0; eidx<elements.Length; eidx++){if (elements [eidx].Matches (text)){if (newSection==null){newSection=newSection (section.Header, section.Footer){FooterView=section.FooterView,HeaderView=section.HeaderView };newSections.Add (newSection);
Sours: https://github.com/migueldeicaza/MonoTouch.Dialog/blob/master/MonoTouch.Dialog/DialogViewController.cs
  1. Hellcat charger years
  2. Engineer cake design
  3. Vermeer trucks
  4. Quickbooks remoteapp

MonoTouch.Dialog

MonoTouch.Dialog is a foundation to create dialog boxes and show table-based information without having to write dozens of delegates and controllers for the user interface. Table support Pull-to-Refresh as well as built-in searching.

screenshot

This was created with the following code:

It is also possible to create user interfaces using a local or remote Json objects, this can be useful to create interfaces driven by data generated on a server. See the section below "Json" for more information.

In addition to being a simple way to create dialogs, it also has been growing to contains a number of utility functions that are useful for iPhone development.

MonoTouch.Dialog is a retained system for implementing UITableViews as opposed to the on-demand nature of UITableView.

Currently this supports creating Dialogs based on navigation controllers that support both basic and advanced cells.

Some basic cells include:

  • On/Off controls
  • Slider (floats)
  • String informational rendering
  • Text Entry
  • Password Entry
  • Jump to HTML page
  • Radio elements
  • Dates, Times and Dates+Times
  • Pull-to-refresh functionality.
  • Activity indicators

Advanced cells include:

  • Container for arbitrary UIViews
  • Mail-like message displays
  • Styled cells, with optional image downloading

The entire UI for TweetStation (http://github.com/migueldeicaza/TweetStation) an app published on the AppStore was built entirely using MonoTouch.Dialog.

You can download the app from the AppStore, and read the code to learn about some advanced used cases of MonoTouch.Dialog.

Miguel ([email protected])

Additional user-contributed elements are now available in

http://github.com/xamarin/monotouch-element-pack

MonoTouch.Dialog core entry point is a UIViewController called the MonoTouch.Dialog.DialogViewController. You initialize instances of this object from an object of type "RootElement" or "JsonElement".

RootElements can be created either manually with the "Elements" API by creating the various nodes necessary to render the information. You would use this if you need control, if you want to extend the features supported by MonoTouch.Dialogs or if you want to dynamically generate the content for your dialog. This is what is used for example in TweetStation for the main timeline views.

Additionally, there is a trivial Reflection-based constructor that can be used for quickly putting together dialogs, for example, creating an account page is as trivial as:

Which produces this UI:

Rendering of AccountInfo

This is what the Elements API usage looks like, it is a more flexible API and the one I suggest you use for anything that requires customizations and goes beyond the basics of the Reflection-based attributes:

To create nested UIs that provide automatic navigation, you would just create an instance of that class.

Autorotation is supported by default by setting the Autorotate property in the DialogViewController. Setting this value will propagate to the various components that are shiped with MonoTouch.Dialog like the WebView and the date and time pickers

Pull to Refresh Support

Pull to Refresh is a visual effect originally found in Tweetie2 which became a popular effect among many applications.

To add automatic pull-to-refersh support to your dialogs, you only need to do two things: hook up an event handler to be notified when the user pulls the data and notify the DialogViewController when the data has been loaded to go back to its default state.

Hooking up a notification is simple, just connect to the RefreshRequested event on the DialogViewController, like this:

Then on your method OnUserRequestedRefresh, you would queue some data loading, request some data from the net, or spin a thread to compute the data. Once the data has been loaded, you must notify the DialogViewController that the new data is in, and to restore the view to its default state, you do this by calling ReloadComplete:

Search Support

To support searching, set the EnableSearch property on your DialogViewController. You can also set the SearchPlaceholder property to use as the watermark text in the search bar.

Searching will change the contents of the view as the user types, it searches the visible fields and shows those to the user. The DialogViewController exposes three methods to programatically initiate, terminate or trigger a new filter operation on the results:

The system is extensible, so you can alter this behavior if you want, details are below.

Samples Included

The sample program exercises various features of the API and should be a useful guide on how to implement certain features. One of the demos uses the Elements API to replicate the "Settings" application on the iPhone.

The Reflection-based dialog construction is used by creating an object of class MonoTouch.Dialog.BindingContext, the method takes three parameters:

  • An object that will be used to resolve Tap targets.

  • The object that will be edited.

A very simple dialog that contains a checkbox is shown here:

The above will generate a page that contains a single item with the caption "Airplane Mode" and a on/off switch. The caption is computed based on the field name. In this case "AirplaneMode" becomes "Airplane Mode". MonoTouch.Dialogs supports other conventions so "AirplaneMode", "airplaneMode" and "airplane_mode" all produce the same caption "Airplane Mode".

If you need to control the actual caption (for example to include special characters, use a different spelling or you are reusing an existing class) you just need to attach the [Caption] attribute to your variable, like this:

The dialog contents are rendered in the same order that the fields are declared in the class. You can use the [Section] attribute to group information in sections that make sense. You can use the [Section] attribute in a few ways:

Creates a new section, with no headers or footers.

Creates a new section, with the specified header and no footer.

Creates a new section with the specified header and footer.

These are the current widgets supported by the Reflection API:

String constants and Buttons.

Use the string type. If the type has a value, in addition to showing the caption, it will render its value on the right.

You can add the [OnTap] attribute to your string to invoke a method on demand.

You can add the [Multiline] attribute to your string to make the cell render in multiple lines. And you can use the [Html] attribute on a string, in that case the value of the string should contain the url to load in the embedded UIWebView.

The [Aligntment] attribute takes a parameter a UITextAlingment that determines how the string should be rendered

Examples:

Text Entry and Password Entries.###

Use the string type for your field and annotate the string with the [Entry] attribute. If you provide an argument to the [Entry] attribute, it will be used as the greyed-out placeholder value for the UITextField.

Use the [Password] attribute instead of [Entry] to create a secure entry line.

Examples:

You can also specify both the Placeholder and the keyboard type to use on the Entry using a few of the Entry attributes:

On/off switches

Use a bool value to store an on/off setting, by default you will get an On/off switch, but you can change this behavior to just show a checkbox instead by using the [Checkbox] attribute:

Examples:

Float values

Using a float in your source will provide a slider on the screen. You can control the ranges of the values by using the [Range (low,high)] attribute. Otherwise the default is to edit a value between 0 and 1.

Examples:

Date Editing

Use a "DateTime" object in your class to present a date picker.

By default this will provide a date and time editor, if you only want to edit the date, set the [Date] attribute, if you only want to edit the time, set the [Time] attribute:

Examples:

Enumeration value

Monotouch.Dialogs will automatically turn an enumeration into a radio selection. Merely specify the enumeration in your file:

Examples:

Additionally, the [Caption] attribute can be applied to the individual elements of an enumeration value to customize how they are rendered.

Images

Variables with type UIImage will render the image as a thumbnail and will invoke the image picker if tapped on.

Examples:

Ignoring Some Fields

If you want to ignore a particular field just apply the [Skip] attribute to the field.

Examples: [Skip] Guid UniquId;

Nested Dialogs

To create nested dialogs just use a nested class, the reflection binder will create the necessary navigation bits based on the container model.

The value for a nested dialog must not be null.

Examples:

To initialize:

IEnumerable as a Radio Source

You can use any type that implements IEnumerable, including generics (which implement IEnumerable) as a source of values for creating a one-of-many selector, similar to the radio-like selection that you get from an enumeration.

To use this, you will need an int value that has the [RadioSelection] attribute set to hold the value that will be selected on startup and also to hold the new value when done.

For example:

The value rendered is the value rendered by calling ToString() on the value returned by IEnumerable.

Creating a Dialog From the Object

Once you have created your class with the proper attributes, you create a binding context, like this:

This will render the information. To fetch the values back after editing you need to call context.Fetch (). You can do this from your favorite handler, and at that point you can also call context.Dispose() to assist the GC in releasing any large resources it might have held.

All that the Reflection API does is create a set of nodes from the Elements API.

First a sample of how you would create a UI taking advantage of C# 3.0 initializers:

You will need a RootElement to get things rolling. The nested structure created by Sections() and Elements() are merely calls to either RootElement.Add () or Section.Add() that the C# compiler invokes for us.

The basic principle is that the DialogViewController shows one RootElement, and a RootElement is made up of Sections which in turn can contain any kind of Element (including other RootElements).

RootElements inside a Section when tapped have the effect of activating a nested UI on a new DialogViewController.

Another advantage of the C# 3.0 syntax is that it can be integrated with LINQ, you can use integrated queries to generate the user interface based on your data. The following example is taken from the MIX Conference:

This generates the user interface for the sessions on a given day

The hierarchy of Elements looks like this:

Additionally notice that when adding elements to a section, you can use either Elements or UIViews directly. The UIViews are just wrapped in a special UIViewElement element.

You can also create your own Elements by subclassing one of the above elements and overriding a handful of methods.

RootElement

RootElements are responsible for showing a full configuration page.

At least one RootElement is required to start the MonoTouch.Dialogs process.

If a RootElement is initialized with a section/element value then this value is used to locate a child Element that will provide a summary of the configuration which is rendered on the right-side of the display.

RootElements are also used to coordinate radio elements. The RadioElement members can span multiple Sections (for example to implement something similar to the ring tone selector and separate custom ring tones from system ringtones). The summary view will show the radio element that is currently selected. To use this, create the Root element with the Group constructor, like this:

The name of the group in RadioGroup is used to show the selected value in the containing page (if any) and the value, which is zero in this case, is the index of the first selected item.

Root elements can also be used inside Sections to trigger loading a new nested configuration page. When used in this mode the caption provided is used while rendered inside a section and is also used as the Title for the subpage. For example:

In the above example, when the user taps on "Desert", MonoTouch.Dialog will create a new page and navigate to it with the root being "Desert" and having a radio group with three values.

In this particular sample, the radio group will select "Chocolate Cake" in the "Desert" section because we passed the value "2" to the RadioGroup. This means pick the 3rd item on the list (zero-index).

Sections are added by calling the Add method or using the C# 4 initializer syntax. The Insert methods are provided to insert sections with an animation.

Additionally, you can create RootElement by using LINQ, like this:

If you create the RootElement with a Group instance (instead of a RadioGroup) the summary value of the RootElement when displayed in a Section will be the cummulative count of all the BooleanElements and CheckboxElements that have the same key as the Group.Key value.

JsonElement

The JsonElement is a sublcass of RootElement that extends a RootElement to be able to load the contents of nested child from a local or remote url.

The JsonElement is a RootElement that can be instantiated in two forms. One version creates a RootElement that will load the contents on demand, these are created by using the JsonElement constructors, which take an extra argument at the end, the url to load the contents from:

The other form creates the data from a local file or an existing System.Json.JsonObject that you have already parsed:

See the section "Json Syntax" for the sample file format and the description of the Json objects.

Sections

Sections are used to group elements in the screen and they are the only valid direct child of the RootElement. Sections can contain any of the standard elements, including new RootElements.

RootElements embedded in a section are used to navigate to a new deeper level.

Sections can have headers and footers either as strings, or as UIViews. Typically you will just use the strings, but to create custom UIs you can use any UIView as the header or the footer. You can either use a string or a view, you would create them like this:

To use views, just pass the views to the constructor:

Standard Elements

MonoTouch.Dialog comes with various standard elements that you can use, the basics include:

  • BooleanElement
  • CheckboxElement
  • FloatElement
  • HtmlElement (to load web pages)
  • ImageElement (to pick images)
  • StringElement To render static strings To render strings with a read-only value. To be used as "buttons", pass a delegate for this.
  • StyledStringElement Similar to StringElement but allows for the Font, TextColor, images and accessories to be set on a per-cell basis.
  • MultilineElement Derives from StringElement, used to render multi-line cells.
  • RadioElements (to provide a radio-button feature).
  • EntryElement (to enter one-line text or passwords)
  • DateTimeElement (to edit dates and times).
  • DateElement (to edit just dates)
  • TimeElement (to edit just times)
  • BadgeElement To render images (57x57) or calendar entries next to the text.

The more sophisticated elements include:

  • MessageElement To show Mail-like information showing a sender, a date, a summary and a message extract with optional message counts and read/unread indicators.

  • OwnerDrawnElement Allows developers to easily create elements that are drawn on demand.

  • UIViewElement Can we used to host a standard UIView as an element, in this case no cell reuse will take place.

Values

Elements that are used to capture user input expose a public "Value" property that holds the current value of the element at any time. It is automatically updated as the user uses the application and does not require any programmer intervention to fetch the state of the control.

This is the behavior for all of the Elements that are part of MonoTouch.Dialog but it is not required for user-created elements.

StringElement

You can use this element to show static strings as a cell in your table, and it is possible to use them as buttons by providing the constructor with an NSAction delegate. If the cell is tapped, this method is invoked for example:

The cost of a StringElement is very low, it uses 8 bytes: 4 for the label alignment information, and 4 for the text to be displayed.

StyledStringElement

This class derives from StringElement but lets developers customize a handful of properties like the Font, the text color, the background cell color, the line breaking mode, the number of lines to display and whether an accessory should be displayed.

For example:

The StyledStringElement also can be configured at creation time to pick one of the four standard cell types to render information, for example:

See the Styled element sample for more information.

EntryElement

The EntryElement is used to get user input and is initialized with three values: the caption for the entry that will be shown to the user, a placeholder text (this is the greyed-out text that provides a hint to the user) and the value of the text.

The placeholder and value can be null, the caption can not.

At any point, the value of the EntryElement can be retrieved by accessing its Value property.

Additionally the KeyboardType property can be set at creation time to the keyboard type style desired for the data entry. This can be used to configure the keyboard for numeric input, phone input, url input or email address input (The values of UIKeyboardType).

Sours: https://github.com/migueldeicaza/MonoTouch.Dialog
Build Your First Android App with Visual Studio 2019 and Xamarin

I am currently using the advanced editing tableview as outlined in Monotouch.Dialog that allows a user to delete as well as edit the label of table elements. Is.

The root element displayed by the DialogViewController the value can be changed during runtime to update the contents. RotatingFooterView. The footer view that.

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Fortunately there's MonoTouch Novell's.NET library that allows C# developers to write C# code that executes in iOS. Furthermore MonoTouch allows you to.

Fortunately there's MonoTouch Novell's.NET library that allows C# developers to write C# code that executes in iOS. Furthermore MonoTouch allows you to.

Fortunately there's MonoTouch Novell's.NET library that allows C# developers to write C# code that executes in iOS. Furthermore MonoTouch allows you to.

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Tools to simplify creating dialogs with the user using MonoTouch MonoTouch.Dialog/DemoReflectionApi.cs at master migueldeicaza/MonoTouch.Dialog.

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I am currently using the advanced editing tableview as outlined in Monotouch.Dialog that allows a user to delete as well as edit the label of.

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public enum Category { Travel Lodging Books } public class Expense A DialogViewController or DVC for short inherits from.

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Sours: https://www.adoclib.com/blog/monotouch-dialogviewcontroller-change-order-of-elements.html

Dialogviewcontroller monotouch

I want to use a DialogViewController inside of a UITabViewController.

Problem: Nested elements don't show a navigation bar, and so it is not possible to go back.

When I push my class (inherited from DialogViewController) to a UINavigationController, then the behavior is correct. If I use the same class in a tab of a UITabViewController (even with an underlying UINavigationController), then the behaviour is wrong.

Can anyone help me out?

Although the question is not assisted with some code sample, I made a small example hoping to solve your question. For this example I used the Tabbed Application template which comes with Xamarin.iOS and named it TabbingTest.

The following code goes in the AppDelegate. Change the method to contain:

Then add the following methods:

Create a class named TestDialogController and paste the following code inside.

Now run the application. You can see that even the nested elements show up nicely in the navigation bar. Even with multilevel nesting.

by   *


Source: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/16496183

Sours: https://www.titanwolf.org/Network/q/da8713b2-88a3-4ed8-a012-40ad02692e8d/y
Build Your First Android App with Visual Studio 2019 and Xamarin
return new RootElement ("Settings") { new Section (){ new BooleanElement ("Airplane Mode", false), new RootElement ("Notifications", 0, 0) { new Section (null, "Turn off Notifications to disable Sounds\n" + "Alerts and Home Screen Badges for the\napplications below."){ new BooleanElement ("Notifications", false) } }}, new Section (){ new RootElement ("Sounds"){ new Section ("Silent") { new BooleanElement ("Vibrate", true), }, new Section ("Ring") { new BooleanElement ("Vibrate", true), new FloatElement (null, null, 0.8f), new RootElement ("Ringtone", new RadioGroup (0)){ new Section ("Custom"){ new RadioElement ("Circus Music"), new RadioElement ("True Blood"), }, new Section ("Standard"){ from name in "Marimba,Alarm,Ascending,Bark".Split (',') (Element) new RadioElement (n) } }, new RootElement ("New Text Message", new RadioGroup (3)){ new Section (){ from name in "None,Tri-tone,Chime,Glass,Horn,Bell,Electronic".Split (',') (Element) new RadioElement (n) } }, new BooleanElement ("New Voice Mail", false), new BooleanElement ("New Mail", false), new BooleanElement ("Sent Mail", true), } }, new RootElement ("Brightness"){ new Section (){ new FloatElement (null, null, 0.5f), new BooleanElement ("Auto-brightness", false), } }, new RootElement ("Wallpaper"){ MakeWallPaper (); } }, new Section () { new EntryElement ("Login", "Your login name", "miguel"), new EntryElement ("Password", "Your password", "password", true), new DateElement ("Select Date", DateTime.Now), }, }
Sours: http://docs.go-mono.com/monodoc.ashx?link=N%3AMonoTouch.Dialog

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When I figured out the things, she beckoned me to the bathroom, where she made a triple enema: Aunt told you to. Be hungry today, and not to leave the house, - she smiled meaningfully. Then she inserted an expansion plug into my anus: Chur, do not take it out.



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