Chainsaw keeps dying

Chainsaw keeps dying DEFAULT

Why does my chainsaw dies when I give it gas?

An engine stalls when it's getting too much or not enough fuel from the carburetor. Stihl chainsaw carburetors usually have three adjustment screws: one each for idle, low speed and high speed. If the saw is stalling when you pull the throttle trigger or it doesn't reach its full power, adjust the high-speed (H) screw.

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Correspondingly, why does my chainsaw bog down when I give it gas?

The Job of the CarburetorWithout the right amount of air and fuel in the piston cylinder, the 2-cycle engine in a Stihl chain saw runs inefficiently and the saw loses power. When the saw bogs down during cutting, it's usually the high-speed screw you need to adjust.

One may also ask, why does my chainsaw not stay running? This sticky fuel can clog up the carburetor and cause the chainsaw engine to stall. If the carburetor is clogged, try cleaning it with carburetor cleaner. If cleaning the carburetor isn't effective, rebuild or replace the entire carburetor. A clogged fuel filter is often caused by leaving old fuel in the chainsaw.

Thereof, why does my chainsaw dies at full throttle?

If your chainsaw engine dies at full throttle, check the following parts: the carburetor, fuel lines, fuel filter, air filter, and muffler. When the carb becomes clogged (which is often the result of old fuel sitting in it over a long period of time, like over the winter), it will not perform this task effectively.

What is the T adjustment on chainsaw?

Adjust the screw labeled 'L' until the chainsaw accelerates smoothly and sounds smooth. Place the flat-head screwdriver on top of the idle-speed adjustment screw which is labeled 'T. ' Turn the screw in a clockwise direction until the chain starts moving.

Sours: https://askinglot.com/why-does-my-chainsaw-dies-when-i-give-it-gas

chainsaw starts then after few cuts shuts down

I have a Poulan Chainsaw rebadged as a McCullock here in Australia.

I had numerous problems with it all fuel related.
Really it was a matter of tuning the carby but Electrolux refused to sell me the tool to do so, so I made my own and then found they were available as an aftermarket item.

One of the biggest problems was that I would use it for a few minutes and then go to idle and it would stall and refuse to start till it cooled down.

The problem was it was running to lean and over heating. Once I adjusted the carby it was fine.

Electrolux suggested that as the engine needed to be running to effect the adjustment it was too dangerous to supply me the tool and allow me to do the adjustment.
I took this as an insult as I had been doing just that for forty years. They said take it to a dealer and he would do a tune up free of charge. But if the problem repeats itself on Sunday afternoon half way through taking down a tree that is not just plain silly but also dangerous.

Look up "McCullock chainsaw tool" for the postings and you will find instructions in making the tool and a source where you can buy one.

Next time buy a Stihl I know I will be.

Regards
Dock.

Sours: https://www.houzz.com/discussions/1615333/chainsaw-starts-then-after-few-cuts-shuts-down
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Chain Saw: Engine Will Idle But Dies At Full Throttle

A carb kit can be purchased to help clean and rebuild a plugged carburetor. For more information, as to how a carburetor can cause this symptom, please see our carburetor section. When dismantling your carburetor for rebuilding, it’s a good idea to take photos as you go, to make reassembly easier. Start with the air filter housing filter and air filter, and take off the bolts holding down the carb and gasket. Take care when removing the fuel lines with a twisting and pulling motion, and take off the carburetor linkage. Unscrew the screws at the bottom of the carb and remove it, pulling the bottom off and removing he gasket and diaphragm. Next take off the primer bulb and cover, and make a note of how the lever, spring, and hinge pin go together on the inside of the carb. Clean the internal parts of your carburetor now with...

A carb kit can be purchased to help clean and rebuild a plugged carburetor. For more information, as to how a carburetor can cause this symptom, please see our carburetor section. When dismantling your carburetor for rebuilding, it’s a good idea to take photos as you go, to make reassembly easier. Start with the air filter housing filter and air filter, and take off the bolts holding down the carb and gasket. Take care when removing the fuel lines with a twisting and pulling motion, and take off the carburetor linkage. Unscrew the screws at the bottom of the carb and remove it, pulling the bottom off and removing he gasket and diaphragm. Next take off the primer bulb and cover, and make a note of how the lever, spring, and hinge pin go together on the inside of the carb. Clean the internal parts of your carburetor now with carb cleaner, using a soft brush to get inside all the holes. It’s at this point you’ll need to look out for corrosion or wear on the internal parts of the carburetor. If you notice damage or corrosion, it’s time to abandon the maintenance and simply purchase a new carburetor, as this one is beyond repair.

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Sours: https://www.ereplacementparts.com/
Top Reasons Chainsaw Starts, Then Stalls — Chainsaw Troubleshooting

My STIHL Saw Keeps Stalling

If your Stihl chainsaw starts up with a reassuring puttering sound, but dies when you pull the throttle trigger, there likely is an issue with the fuel, but the carburetor could need adjustment. If the saw stalls while it's idling, it's almost surely a misadjusted carburetor. Before you adjust the carburetor or change the fuel, though, it's important to make sure the engine is getting all the air it needs for proper fuel combustion.

Check the Filters

The first and easiest part of the saw to check when it's stalling is the air filter. If the saw has been in use for many hours, it isn't unusual for it to clog and prevent air getting into the carburetor. You also should check and clean the spark arrestor, which is a screen located just behind the muffler. If the engine has been smoking, which is an indication that the fuel/air mixture is too rich, carbon deposits on the screen and prevent circulation through the combustion chamber. Finally, replace the fuel filter, which is in the gas tank.

Fuel Issues

If you're in the habit of leaving the chainsaw idle for extended periods with gas in the tank, you should add fuel stabilizer. Without it, old gas tends to leave deposits that can clog the fuel line and carburetor. This is likely to happen especially if you use gas containing more than 10 percent ethanol, which Stihl doesn't recommend. Ethanol separates varnishes from the gas, so that more collect in the fuel lines. It also combines with water from the air, which inhibits combustion, and settles at the bottom of the gas tank and in the carburetor.

Carburetor Adjustment

An engine stalls when it's getting too much or not enough fuel from the carburetor. Stihl chainsaw carburetors usually have three adjustment screws: one each for idle, low speed and high speed. If the saw stalls while it's idling, adjusting the idle screw, which usually is marked LA, should help. If the saw is stalling when you pull the throttle trigger or it doesn't reach its full power, adjust the high-speed (H) screw. Adjusting the low-speed (L) screw also may help with smoother idling or if the saw cuts out at the moment you pull the throttle.

Tuning Up

Cleaning the filters and adjusting the carburetor are part of a tune-up procedure that you should conduct regularly to keep your saw running well. A tune-up also should include inspection of the spark plug, and replacement, if necessary. If the plug's electrodes are full of carbon deposits, it's an indication that the fuel mixture is too rich, and the plug itself may be misfiring. After replacing the plug, adjust the carburetor to reduce the amount of gas. If the electrodes are burnt, on the other hand, the fuel is burning too hot. That's a sign of too much ethanol in the gasoline.

References

Writer Bio

Chris Deziel has a bachelor's degree in physics and a master's degree in humanities. Besides having an abiding interest in popular science, Deziel has been active in the building and home design trades since 1975. As a landscape builder, he helped establish two gardening companies.

Sours: https://homeguides.sfgate.com/stihl-saw-keeps-stalling-96855.html

Keeps dying chainsaw

My Chainsaw Runs Then Stalls

If your chainsaw stalls instead of producing the reassuringly high-pitched sound of a healthy engine when you press the throttle trigger, something is interfering with efficient fuel combustion. The problem could be a lack of air or a misfiring spark plug, and both of these problems are easy to check and remedy. Things might be a little more complicated if the problem is related to fuel delivery or to the composition of the fuel itself.

Check the Filters

A chainsaw has two filters to regulate air circulation and one to keep debris out of the fuel, and all of them need regular servicing. A dirty air filter -- which filters air coming through the intake port -- or spark arrestor -- which filters the exhaust -- impedes air circulation and kills the engine. The air filter is under a cover on the engine housing, and the spark arrestor is between the exhaust port and the muffler. Both are easy to remove and service. A dirty fuel filter restricts fuel flow, which also kills the engine. The fuel filter is usually in the gas tank and easily removable and replaceable.

Fuel Issues

If your chainsaw has been in storage, the fuel may need to be replaced. When gasoline is left standing in the fuel lines and carburetor, it partially evaporates, leaving behind a varnish-like substance that clogs the fuel system. The fuel may also have moisture in it, and the moisture mixes with ethanol in the gasoline and settles at the bottom of the tank, which is where the fuel line is located. The ethanol-water mixture clogs the fuel system. When you remove the old fuel, you should disassemble the fuel lines and spray them with carburetor cleaner to dissolve deposits.

Adjusting the Carburetor

An important part of diagnosis of engine stalling is to remove and examine the spark plug. If the plug is excessively coated with carbon deposits, it's a sign that the fuel mixture in the combustion chamber is too rich. You'll probably also find excess deposits on the spark arrestor. On many chainsaw models, you can control the amount of fuel that the carburetor sprays into the combustion chamber by turning one of its adjustment screws. If the engine dies while idling, the idle adjustment needs to be tightened. If the engine doesn't stall until you depress the throttle, tighten either the low-or high-speed adjustment screw to improve performance.

Persistent Stalling

If you fail to improve performance by replacing filters or adjusting the carburetor. You may have to remove the carburetor, disassemble it, clean each part with carburetor cleaner and rebuild it. A carburetor kit will helps with this. Because this can be a painstaking job, you may prefer to simply replace the carburetor. If that doesn't get the saw running smoothly, it's probably time to bring it in for servicing. Worn crankcase seals and malfunctions of moving parts inside the engine itself can cause stalling. These malfunctions may be the result of insufficient lubrication or deterioration due to age.

References

Writer Bio

Chris Deziel has a bachelor's degree in physics and a master's degree in humanities. Besides having an abiding interest in popular science, Deziel has been active in the building and home design trades since 1975. As a landscape builder, he helped establish two gardening companies.

Sours: https://homeguides.sfgate.com/chainsaw-runs-then-stalls-95897.html
Husqvarna chainsaw won't stay running.

Chain Saw: Starts But Immediately Dies

The carburetor is a part that, when plugged or improperly adjusted, can cause your chainsaw to start up, but immediately die. Many carburetors have adjustment screws, and you may be able to use them to get your engine working properly again. If you’ve worked to adjust to the carburetor and it’s still causing this problem, it is probably plugged. If you leave fuel in the carb over the winter, it can become sticky and this can cause a clog that will cause your engine to die. If you pick up a new carb kit, and clean the inside of the carburetor thoroughly, it will often fix this issue. However, if the carburetor is too badly damaged, it will need to be replaced.

The carburetor is a part that, when plugged or improperly adjusted, can cause your chainsaw to start up, but immediately die. Many carburetors have adjustment screws, and you may be able to use them to get your engine working properly again. If you’ve worked to adjust to the carburetor and it’s still causing this problem, it is probably plugged. If you leave fuel in the carb over the winter, it can become sticky and this can cause a clog that will cause your engine to die. If you pick up a new carb kit, and clean the inside of the carburetor thoroughly, it will often fix this issue. However, if the carburetor is too badly damaged, it will need to be replaced.

Sours: https://www.ereplacementparts.com/

Now discussing:

Are you struggling to fix a chainsaw that won’t stay running? Does your chainsaw die just after staying a couple of seconds at idle? Does your chainsaw run and then stop? Well, there are a couple of factors that are responsible for preventing your chainsaw from staying running.

In this article, we will be discussing all the possible reasons for the aforementioned problems. The troubleshooting of these problems is not that much difficult. We hope that you will be able to fix your chainsaw on your own.

To make the troubleshooting process convenient for you, we are going to place the problems along with their solutions sequentially. If required, you are welcome to skip one or more steps.

Required Tools and Items:

  • A screwdriver
  • A wrench & drift
  • Alcohol/kerosene
  • Grease

Contents

Probable Reasons & Solutions: A Chainsaw Won’t Stay Running

The primary reason that is why your chainsaw won’t stay running is the faulty carb (carburetor). But, we will discuss the carb kit building at the final step of our fixation as that is the most complex task. Moreover, several reasons may cause stalling/shutting down the engine. To keep things simpler, we have discussed the most common factors that frequently produce the engine stalls. Read the article carefully and apply one troubleshooting at a time to avoid damaging your chainsaw.

Blocked or Damaged Idle Port

In your chainsaw, there is an idle port which is responsible to keep your chainsaw in idle position. But, this port becomes blocked or damaged due to extensive use, poorly designed metal, or deteriorated with the time. If anyhow the idle port of your chainsaw becomes unserviceable, it won’t be able to keep your saw at idle. As a result, the chainsaw won’t stay running.

Solution: Inspect the idle port to see the condition. Look through the porthole using torchlight and look for damage or blockage. If found blocked, clean it using alcohol or kerosene. If found damaged, buy a new idle port and replace the old one. To get going with the displaced/deteriorated port, turn the ideal port screw clockwise to tighten it to the fullest. Thus, the port will apply force to make your chainsaw stay running.

Spark Plug/Switches

Check to ensure that all the switches and spark plug of your chainsaw is in working conditions. Sometimes, a defective switch or blocked spark plug may produce the problem. So, you need to be very clear about the spark plug/switch conditions.

Problem with Bad Fuel

Another issue that may stop your chainsaw from running is bad/contaminated fuel. Usually, fuel remains in good condition for 8 weeks after purchasing from the pump. After this period, a few volatile agents may be evaporated from the fuel and caused the problems.

Solution: To get the optimum service from the engine of your chainsaw, you should always use premium fuel/gas. Using bad fuel can have a severe impact on your saw engine. Thus, bad fuel may cut your pocket and man-hour. Do not hesitate to replace this bad fuel with any premium fuel.

Clogged Air Filter

The air filter of your chainsaw ensures that the saw engine gets enough air to burn the fuel. When the air filter becomes clogged, the engine doesn’t get the required air to its combustion chamber. As a result, the engine stalls or shuts down immediately.

Solution: Remove the air filter from its bay. At first, clean the filter using air blow and then clean it using alcohol or kerosene. After that, insert the air filter into its bay. Now, give a functional run to see whether the problem exists or not. If exists, move on to the next step. You may consider buying a new air filter if the present one isn’t in working condition.

Faulty Gas/Fuel filter

Gas or fuel filter ensures that your chainsaw gets the filtered gas/fuel. The filter prevents any rust/dirt entering into the combustion chamber. If the filter becomes blocked, the engine won’t get any fuel to run. Moreover, if the filter becomes damaged/deteriorated, it will supply contaminated fuel to the engine. As a result, the engine will stop running.

Solution: Take out the gas/fuel filter from its bay and clean it following the same way as an air filter. After that, place the filter back to its position and give a functional test run. If the problem still exists, move on to the next step.

Hunter Tips: To get out of operational hazards, try to avoid ethanol gas. Instead, consider buying any premium or marina gas.

Rebuilding Carb Kit & O-rings

The carburetor of chainsaw controls and supplies fuel/gas into the combustion chamber. Depending on your throttle position, the carb increases/decreases the flow of gas/fuel into the combustion chamber. Any malfunction of the carb stops or oversupplies the fuel into the chamber. Sometimes, the defective carb offers an intermittent supply of fuel. The O-rings or washer seal may cause the problem if it becomes torn out or deteriorated. It is responsible to seal the fuel pump so that it doesn’t leak fuel.

Solution: Take out the carb using wrench and screwdriver. Check to see whether the carb has been damaged with the time. Inspect the condition of the O-rings. Clean the carb using kerosene and lubricate the thread or moveable portion with grease. After that insert the carb and O-rings back to their respective positions. Give the final function test run of your chainsaw. If the problem still exists, you have to buy the carb kit and replace the unserviceable one.

Note: To get going with the faulty carb kit, you may use carb cleaner during engine operation. Try to use recommended spraying carb cleaner into the carb while the saw engine is running.

Conclusion

The saw, be it professional or homeowner chainsaw is a handy tool to cut through. But, it can take away money from your pocket and produce unwanted annoying if not maintained properly. So, you have to maintain your tools and equipment in a way that, your tools do not get the scope to produce extra hazards. Like the proverb says “a stitch in time saves nine”, you have to be careful about the scheduled maintenance of your chainsaw. We hope that our coverage on “chainsaw won’t stay running” was helpful for you. If you have any queries, please feel free to drop a line via our comment box.

Sours: https://www.powertoolhunter.com/chainsaw-wont-stay-running/


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