Get checkout

Get checkout DEFAULT

Git Checkout Commit

Whenever you want to check when a specific behavior was introduced into your code, checking out a commit can be the perfect solution.

We’re going to walk through how to Git checkout a commit using the cross-platform GitKraken Git GUI before showing you how to perform the action in the command line.

Checkout commits in just 2 clicks with GitKraken. ⬇️

How do you Git checkout a commit with GitKraken?

Checking out commits in GitKraken is fast and straightforward. Simply right-click on a commit from the central graph and select  from the context menu.

Yes, it’s that easy.

No commit hashes needed when checking out commits with GitKraken.💥

How do you Git checkout a commit in the command line?

To checkout a Git commit, you will need the commit hash. If you’re using the terminal, you don’t have immediate visual access to your commit information. To pull up a list of your commits and their associated hashes, you can run the  command.

To checkout a previous commit, you will use the Git checkout command followed by the commit hash you retrieved from your Git log.

Make the process of checking out commits easier with the GitKraken Git GUI for Windows, Mac, and Linux. The visual context allows you to checkout commits in just two clicks, without worrying about hashes.

Sours: https://www.gitkraken.com/learn/git/problems/git-checkout-commit

git checkout

The "checkout" command can switch the currently active branch - but it can also be used to restore files.

The most common use case for "checkout" is when you want to switch to a different branch, making it the new HEAD branch.

Another use case for "checkout" is when you want to restore a historic version of a specific file. Thereby, you can reset single files to earlier revisions - while keeping the rest of the project untouched.

Important Options

<branch-name>

The name of a local branch that you want to switch to. By specifying the name of a local branch, you will switch to this branch and make it the current "HEAD" branch.

-b <new-branch>

Creates a new local branch and directly switches to it. This can be used as a shortcut instead of the following two commands:
git branch <new-branch-name>
git checkout <new-branch-name>.

-b <new-branch> --track <remote-branch>

Creates a new local branch - and sets up an "upstream" configuration. This way, the new local branch has a tracking relationship with its remote counterpart. This allows you to more easily see when the two aren't in sync (i.e. when unpushed commits in the local branch or unpulled commits in the remote exist).

<file-path> <commit-hash>

Restores a historic revision of a given file. By providing HEAD as the revision, you can restore the last committed version of a file - effectively undoing any local changes that happened since then. If you want to restore a specific earlier revision you can provide that revision's SHA-1 hash.

Usage Examples

In its simplest (and most common) form, only the name of an existing local branch is specified:

This will make the given branch the new HEAD branch. If, in one go, you also want to create a new local branch, you can use the "-b" parameter:

By using the "--track" parameter, you can use a remote branch as the basis for a new local branch; this will also set up a "tracking relationship" between the two:



Another use case for "checkout" is when you want to restore an old revision of a file:

If you specify "HEAD" as the revision, you will restore the last committed version of the file, effectively undoing any local changes that you current have in that file:

Tip

Quick Checkout in Tower

In case you are using the Tower Git client, using checkout becomes easy as pie. Simply double-click a branch in the sidebar to make it the new HEAD branch - or choose a branch from a list.

Learn More

Sours: https://www.git-tower.com/learn/git/commands/git-checkout
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Check out a branch

When working in your local repository, you may want to checkout and work on branch code rather than the main code line. Just as with the main code line, when you push branch code to Bitbucket Cloud, it tracks that branch for you. To see which branches you or others on your workspace pushed, see the Branches list in your repository.

Branching is an advanced technique. The information on this page is not a definitive guide for either Git or Mercurial. It merely provides a pointer to help you understand how Bitbucket supports branches. If you plan to use branches a lot or want to know more, we recommend you learn more by visiting a site or buying a book devoted to the DVCS you are using (Git or Mercurial).

Ask Bitbucket for your checkout command

When you checkout a branch, you should already have a local clone of the parent repository. The Bitbucket interface gives you the basic command for checking out a branch. If you're using Sourcetree, Bitbucket gives you a single button checkout.

  1. From the repository's Branches tab, click the branch you want to checkout.

  2. Press the Check out button to display the appropriate check out command.

  3. Copy the command (or choose Check out in Sourcetree if you'd rather use Sourcetree).

  4. Open the terminal on your local machine and change to the root directory of your repository.

  5. At the command line, enter the copied command from Bitbucket and press ENTER.

Using Git to checkout a branch on the command line

For the purposes of these steps, <feature_branch> will refer to the name of your branch.

On your local system, make sure you have a local repository cloned from the remote repository. Then, do the following:

  1. Change to the root of the local repository.

    $ cd <repo_name>

  2. List all your branches:

    $ git branch -a

    You should see something similar to the following:

    * main   <feature_branch>
      remotes/origin/<feature_branch>
      remotes/origin/main

    Notice that it lists both the branches that are local and the remote branches on Bitbucket. Using the list as reference, choose the branch you want to checkout.  In this example, the feature branch is the branch.

  3. Checkout the branch you want to use.

    $ git checkout <feature_branch>

  4. Confirm you are now working on that branch:

    $ git branch

    You should see something similar to the following:

    $ git branch
    * <feature_branch>
      main

Going forward, all your Git commands apply to the branch.  When you push the changes to your remote Bitbucket repository, those changes apply to the repository's branch.

Sours: https://support.atlassian.com/bitbucket-cloud/docs/check-out-a-branch/
How To Make WooCommerce Checkout Like Shopify - Conversion Optimized, Oh And [ FREE ]

Checkout V2

GitHub Actions status

This action checks-out your repository under , so your workflow can access it.

Only a single commit is fetched by default, for the ref/SHA that triggered the workflow. Set to fetch all history for all branches and tags. Refer here to learn which commit points to for different events.

The auth token is persisted in the local git config. This enables your scripts to run authenticated git commands. The token is removed during post-job cleanup. Set to opt-out.

When Git 2.18 or higher is not in your PATH, falls back to the REST API to download the files.

  • Improved performance
    • Fetches only a single commit by default
  • Script authenticated git commands
    • Auth token persisted in the local git config
  • Supports SSH
  • Creates a local branch
    • No longer detached HEAD when checking out a branch
  • Improved layout
    • The input is always relative to $GITHUB_WORKSPACE
    • Aligns better with container actions, where $GITHUB_WORKSPACE gets mapped in
  • Fallback to REST API download
    • When Git 2.18 or higher is not in the PATH, the REST API will be used to download the files
    • When using a job container, the container's PATH is used

Refer here for previous versions.

- uses: actions/[email protected]: # Repository name with owner. For example, actions/checkout# Default: ${{ github.repository }}repository: ''# The branch, tag or SHA to checkout. When checking out the repository that# triggered a workflow, this defaults to the reference or SHA for that event.# Otherwise, uses the default branch.ref: ''# Personal access token (PAT) used to fetch the repository. The PAT is configured# with the local git config, which enables your scripts to run authenticated git# commands. The post-job step removes the PAT.## We recommend using a service account with the least permissions necessary. Also# when generating a new PAT, select the least scopes necessary.## [Learn more about creating and using encrypted secrets](https://help.github.com/en/actions/automating-your-workflow-with-github-actions/creating-and-using-encrypted-secrets)## Default: ${{ github.token }}token: ''# SSH key used to fetch the repository. The SSH key is configured with the local# git config, which enables your scripts to run authenticated git commands. The# post-job step removes the SSH key.## We recommend using a service account with the least permissions necessary.## [Learn more about creating and using encrypted secrets](https://help.github.com/en/actions/automating-your-workflow-with-github-actions/creating-and-using-encrypted-secrets)ssh-key: ''# Known hosts in addition to the user and global host key database. The public SSH# keys for a host may be obtained using the utility `ssh-keyscan`. For example,# `ssh-keyscan github.com`. The public key for github.com is always implicitly# added.ssh-known-hosts: ''# Whether to perform strict host key checking. When true, adds the options# `StrictHostKeyChecking=yes` and `CheckHostIP=no` to the SSH command line. Use# the input `ssh-known-hosts` to configure additional hosts.# Default: truessh-strict: ''# Whether to configure the token or SSH key with the local git config# Default: truepersist-credentials: ''# Relative path under $GITHUB_WORKSPACE to place the repositorypath: ''# Whether to execute `git clean -ffdx && git reset --hard HEAD` before fetching# Default: trueclean: ''# Number of commits to fetch. 0 indicates all history for all branches and tags.# Default: 1fetch-depth: ''# Whether to download Git-LFS files# Default: falselfs: ''# Whether to checkout submodules: `true` to checkout submodules or `recursive` to# recursively checkout submodules.## When the `ssh-key` input is not provided, SSH URLs beginning with# `[email protected]:` are converted to HTTPS.## Default: falsesubmodules: ''

Fetch all history for all tags and branches

- uses: actions/[email protected]: fetch-depth: 0

Checkout a different branch

- uses: actions/[email protected]: ref: my-branch

Checkout HEAD^

- uses: actions/[email protected]: fetch-depth: 2 - run: git checkout HEAD^

Checkout multiple repos (side by side)

- name: Checkoutuses: actions/[email protected]: path: main - name: Checkout tools repouses: actions/[email protected]: repository: my-org/my-toolspath: my-tools

Checkout multiple repos (nested)

- name: Checkoutuses: actions/[email protected] - name: Checkout tools repouses: actions/[email protected]: repository: my-org/my-toolspath: my-tools

Checkout multiple repos (private)

- name: Checkoutuses: actions/[email protected]: path: main - name: Checkout private toolsuses: actions/[email protected]: repository: my-org/my-private-toolstoken: ${{ secrets.GitHub_PAT }} # `GitHub_PAT` is a secret that contains your PATpath: my-tools
  • is scoped to the current repository, so if you want to checkout a different repository that is private you will need to provide your own PAT.

Checkout pull request HEAD commit instead of merge commit

- uses: actions/[email protected]: ref: ${{ github.event.pull_request.head.sha }}

Checkout pull request on closed event

on: pull_request: branches: [main]types: [opened, synchronize, closed]jobs: build: runs-on: ubuntu-lateststeps: - uses: actions/[email protected]

Push a commit using the built-in token

on: pushjobs: build: runs-on: ubuntu-lateststeps: - uses: actions/[email protected] - run: | date > generated.txt git config user.name github-actions git config user.email [email protected] git add . git commit -m "generated" git push

The scripts and documentation in this project are released under the MIT License

Sours: https://github.com/actions/checkout

Checkout get

Cloning a repository

About cloning a repository

You can clone a repository from GitHub.com to your local computer to make it easier to fix merge conflicts, add or remove files, and push larger commits. When you clone a repository, you copy the repository from GitHub.com to your local machine.

Cloning a repository pulls down a full copy of all the repository data that GitHub.com has at that point in time, including all versions of every file and folder for the project. You can push your changes to the remote repository on GitHub.com, or pull other people's changes from GitHub.com. For more information, see "Using Git".

You can clone your existing repository or clone another person's existing repository to contribute to a project.

Cloning a repository

  1. On GitHub.com, navigate to the main page of the repository.

  2. Above the list of files, click Code. "Code" button

  3. To clone the repository using HTTPS, under "Clone with HTTPS", click . To clone the repository using an SSH key, including a certificate issued by your organization's SSH certificate authority, click Use SSH, then click . To clone a repository using GitHub CLI, click Use GitHub CLI, then click . The clipboard icon for copying the URL to clone a repository

    The clipboard icon for copying the URL to clone a repository with GitHub CLI

  4. Open TerminalTerminalGit Bash.

  5. Change the current working directory to the location where you want the cloned directory.

  6. Type , and then paste the URL you copied earlier.

  7. Press Enter to create your local clone.

To clone a repository locally, use the subcommand. Replace the parameter with the repository name. For example, , , or . If the portion of the repository argument is omitted, it defaults to the name of the authenticating user.

You can also use the GitHub URL to clone a repository.

  1. On GitHub.com, navigate to the main page of the repository.
  2. Above the list of files, click Code. "Code" button
  3. Click Open with GitHub Desktop to clone and open the repository with GitHub Desktop. "Open with GitHub Desktop" button
  4. Follow the prompts in GitHub Desktop to complete the clone.

For more information, see "Cloning a repository from GitHub to GitHub Desktop."

Cloning an empty repository

An empty repository contains no files. It's often made if you don't initialize the repository with a README when creating it.

  1. On GitHub.com, navigate to the main page of the repository.

  2. To clone your repository using the command line using HTTPS, under "Quick setup", click . To clone the repository using an SSH key, including a certificate issued by your organization's SSH certificate authority, click SSH, then click . Empty repository clone URL button

    Alternatively, to clone your repository in Desktop, click Set up in Desktop and follow the prompts to complete the clone. Empty repository clone desktop button

  3. Open TerminalTerminalGit Bash.

  4. Change the current working directory to the location where you want the cloned directory.

  5. Type , and then paste the URL you copied earlier.

  6. Press Enter to create your local clone.

Troubleshooting cloning errors

When cloning a repository it's possible that you might encounter some errors.

If you're unable to clone a repository, check that:

Further reading

Sours: https://docs.github.com/en/repositories/creating-and-managing-repositories/cloning-a-repository
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-q
--quiet

Quiet, suppress feedback messages.

--progress
--no-progress

Progress status is reported on the standard error stream by default when it is attached to a terminal, unless is specified. This flag enables progress reporting even if not attached to a terminal, regardless of .

-f
--force

When switching branches, proceed even if the index or the working tree differs from . This is used to throw away local changes.

When checking out paths from the index, do not fail upon unmerged entries; instead, unmerged entries are ignored.

--ours
--theirs

When checking out paths from the index, check out stage #2 (ours) or #3 (theirs) for unmerged paths.

Note that during and , ours and theirs may appear swapped; gives the version from the branch the changes are rebased onto, while gives the version from the branch that holds your work that is being rebased.

This is because is used in a workflow that treats the history at the remote as the shared canonical one, and treats the work done on the branch you are rebasing as the third-party work to be integrated, and you are temporarily assuming the role of the keeper of the canonical history during the rebase. As the keeper of the canonical history, you need to view the history from the remote as (i.e. "our shared canonical history"), while what you did on your side branch as (i.e. "one contributor’s work on top of it").

-b <new_branch>

Create a new branch named and start it at ; see git-branch[1] for details.

-B <new_branch>

Creates the branch and start it at ; if it already exists, then reset it to . This is equivalent to running "git branch" with "-f"; see git-branch[1] for details.

-t
--track

When creating a new branch, set up "upstream" configuration. See "--track" in git-branch[1] for details.

If no option is given, the name of the new branch will be derived from the remote-tracking branch, by looking at the local part of the refspec configured for the corresponding remote, and then stripping the initial part up to the "*". This would tell us to use as the local branch when branching off of (or , or even ). If the given name has no slash, or the above guessing results in an empty name, the guessing is aborted. You can explicitly give a name with in such a case.

--no-track

Do not set up "upstream" configuration, even if the configuration variable is true.

--guess
--no-guess

If is not found but there does exist a tracking branch in exactly one remote (call it ) with a matching name, treat as equivalent to

$ git checkout -b <branch> --track <remote>/<branch>

If the branch exists in multiple remotes and one of them is named by the configuration variable, we’ll use that one for the purposes of disambiguation, even if the isn’t unique across all remotes. Set it to e.g. to always checkout remote branches from there if is ambiguous but exists on the origin remote. See also in git-config[1].

is the default behavior. Use to disable it.

The default behavior can be set via the configuration variable.

-l

Create the new branch’s reflog; see git-branch[1] for details.

-d
--detach

Rather than checking out a branch to work on it, check out a commit for inspection and discardable experiments. This is the default behavior of when is not a branch name. See the "DETACHED HEAD" section below for details.

--orphan <new_branch>

Create a new orphan branch, named , started from and switch to it. The first commit made on this new branch will have no parents and it will be the root of a new history totally disconnected from all the other branches and commits.

The index and the working tree are adjusted as if you had previously run . This allows you to start a new history that records a set of paths similar to by easily running to make the root commit.

This can be useful when you want to publish the tree from a commit without exposing its full history. You might want to do this to publish an open source branch of a project whose current tree is "clean", but whose full history contains proprietary or otherwise encumbered bits of code.

If you want to start a disconnected history that records a set of paths that is totally different from the one of , then you should clear the index and the working tree right after creating the orphan branch by running from the top level of the working tree. Afterwards you will be ready to prepare your new files, repopulating the working tree, by copying them from elsewhere, extracting a tarball, etc.

--ignore-skip-worktree-bits

In sparse checkout mode, would update only entries matched by and sparse patterns in . This option ignores the sparse patterns and adds back any files in .

-m
--merge

When switching branches, if you have local modifications to one or more files that are different between the current branch and the branch to which you are switching, the command refuses to switch branches in order to preserve your modifications in context. However, with this option, a three-way merge between the current branch, your working tree contents, and the new branch is done, and you will be on the new branch.

When a merge conflict happens, the index entries for conflicting paths are left unmerged, and you need to resolve the conflicts and mark the resolved paths with (or if the merge should result in deletion of the path).

When checking out paths from the index, this option lets you recreate the conflicted merge in the specified paths.

When switching branches with , staged changes may be lost.

--conflict=<style>

The same as option above, but changes the way the conflicting hunks are presented, overriding the configuration variable. Possible values are "merge" (default) and "diff3" (in addition to what is shown by "merge" style, shows the original contents).

-p
--patch

Interactively select hunks in the difference between the (or the index, if unspecified) and the working tree. The chosen hunks are then applied in reverse to the working tree (and if a was specified, the index).

This means that you can use to selectively discard edits from your current working tree. See the “Interactive Mode” section of git-add[1] to learn how to operate the mode.

Note that this option uses the no overlay mode by default (see also ), and currently doesn’t support overlay mode.

--ignore-other-worktrees

refuses when the wanted ref is already checked out by another worktree. This option makes it check the ref out anyway. In other words, the ref can be held by more than one worktree.

--overwrite-ignore
--no-overwrite-ignore

Silently overwrite ignored files when switching branches. This is the default behavior. Use to abort the operation when the new branch contains ignored files.

--recurse-submodules
--no-recurse-submodules

Using will update the content of all active submodules according to the commit recorded in the superproject. If local modifications in a submodule would be overwritten the checkout will fail unless is used. If nothing (or ) is used, submodules working trees will not be updated. Just like git-submodule[1], this will detach of the submodule.

--overlay
--no-overlay

In the default overlay mode, never removes files from the index or the working tree. When specifying , files that appear in the index and working tree, but not in are removed, to make them match exactly.

--pathspec-from-file=<file>

Pathspec is passed in instead of commandline args. If is exactly then standard input is used. Pathspec elements are separated by LF or CR/LF. Pathspec elements can be quoted as explained for the configuration variable (see git-config[1]). See also and global .

--pathspec-file-nul

Only meaningful with . Pathspec elements are separated with NUL character and all other characters are taken literally (including newlines and quotes).

<branch>

Branch to checkout; if it refers to a branch (i.e., a name that, when prepended with "refs/heads/", is a valid ref), then that branch is checked out. Otherwise, if it refers to a valid commit, your becomes "detached" and you are no longer on any branch (see below for details).

You can use the syntax to refer to the N-th last branch/commit checked out using "git checkout" operation. You may also specify which is synonymous to .

As a special case, you may use as a shortcut for the merge base of and if there is exactly one merge base. You can leave out at most one of and , in which case it defaults to .

<new_branch>

Name for the new branch.

<start_point>

The name of a commit at which to start the new branch; see git-branch[1] for details. Defaults to .

As a special case, you may use as a shortcut for the merge base of and if there is exactly one merge base. You can leave out at most one of and , in which case it defaults to .

<tree-ish>

Tree to checkout from (when paths are given). If not specified, the index will be used.

As a special case, you may use as a shortcut for the merge base of and if there is exactly one merge base. You can leave out at most one of and , in which case it defaults to .

--

Do not interpret any more arguments as options.

<pathspec>…​

Limits the paths affected by the operation.

Sours: https://git-scm.com/docs/git-checkout

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