Get ou powershell

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PowerShell Get-ADOrganizationalUnit cmdlet gets one or more active directory Organizational Unit (OU). Get-ADOrganizationalUnit used to get multiple OU based on search criteria.

In this article, I will explain how to use PowerShell Get-ADOrganizationalUnit with additional properties to specific OU or multiple OU’s in PowerShell.

Get-ADOrganizationalUnit Syntax

PowerShell Get-ADOrganizationalUnit active directory cmdlet retrieves information about one or more organizational unit (OU) in active directory.

Get-ADOrganizationalUnit [-AuthType <ADAuthType>] [-Credential <PSCredential>] -Filter <String> [-Properties <String[]>] [-ResultPageSize <Int32>] [-ResultSetSize <Int32>] [-SearchBase <String>] [-SearchScope <ADSearchScope>] [-Server <String>] [<CommonParameters>] Get-ADOrganizationalUnit [-AuthType <ADAuthType>] [-Credential <PSCredential>] [-Identity] <ADOrganizationalUnit> [-Partition <String>] [-Properties <String[]>] [-Server <String>] [<CommonParameters>] Get-ADOrganizationalUnit [-AuthType <ADAuthType> [-Credential <PSCredential>] -LDAPFilter <String> [-Properties <String[]>] [-ResultPageSize <Int32>] [-ResultSetSize <Int32>] [-SearchBase <String>] [-SearchScope <ADSearchScope>] [-Server <String>] [<CommonParameters>]

Let’s understand each of the Get- ADOrganizationalUnit key parameters as below:

AuthType – authentication method to use based on either Basic (or 1) or Negotiate (or 0). It has Negotiate default authentication method.

SSL (Secure Socket Layer) connection is required to use Basic Authentication method.

Credential PSCredential – It specifies user credentials required to perform Get-ADGroup search for group. It default accepts credentials of logged on users.

To use Credential parameter, use username as User1 or domain\User1 or you can create and use object by using cmdlet.

-Identity – It specifies Active Directory group object to get OU search using distinguished name, GUID , security identifier or SAMAccountName

-Partition – It specifies the distinguished name of an active directory partition.

Filter – It specifies a query string (PowerShell Expression Language Syntax) to retrieves Active Directory objects. PowerShell wildcards other than * are not supported by syntax.

-LDAPFilter – LDAPFilter query string is used to filter Active Directory objects.

Using Get-ADOrganizationalUnit Filter parameter (wildcard)

If you want to search for specific OU or multiple OU’s in active directory, use filter or LDAPFilter .

cmdlet filter parameter with wildcard (asterisk) for search and lists all OU’s available in Active Directory

Get-ADOrganizationalUnit -Filter *

Above cmdlet, Filter parameter with wild character (*) returns all the OU available in domain. Filter parameter uses PowerShell expression language to write query string for Active Directory.

Cool Tip: How to create Organizational Unit in PowerShell!

Lets understand PowerShell Active Directory Get-ADOrganizationalUnit cmdlet with examples.

Get-ADOrganizationalUnit to Get all OUs in a Domain

To get all OUs in domain, run below command

Get-ADOrganizationalUnit -Filter 'Name -like "*"' | Format-Table Name, DistinguishedName -A

Above PowerShell Get-ADOrganizationalUnit cmdlet use parameter with search condition where OU name like to get all OUs in a domain.

Output of above using get-adorganizationalunit command as below

Cool Tip: how to use PowerShell Set-ADUser to modify Active Directory user attributes.

Get-ADOrganizationalUnit to Get OU using Distinguished Name

If you want to get an OU using distinguished name, run below command

Get-ADOrganizationalUnit -Identity "OU=SALES,DC=SHELLPRO,DC=LOCAL" | Format-Table Name,DistinguishedName,ObjectClass

In the above PowerShell script, Get-ADOrganizationalUnit cmdlet returns the OU specified by distinguishedname in Identity parameter and format results parameters to table as below

Cool Tip: how to get-aduser using userprincipalname in PowerShell!

Conclusion

I hope above article on PowerShell Get-ADOrganizationalUnit cmdlet to gets one or more Organizational Unit (OU) in active directory.

Get- ADOrganizationalUnit cmdlet returns a default set of properties. To get additional properties of OU, use – parameter.

You can find more topics about PowerShell Active Directory commands and PowerShell basics on ShellGeek home page.

Categories PowerShellTags Active Directory, Get-ADOrganizationalUnit, OU in Active DirectorySours: https://shellgeek.com/get-adorganizationalunit-in-active-directory/

Get-ADOrganizationalUnit

Get one or more Active Directory organizational units.

Syntax Get-ADOrganizationalUnit [-Identity] ADOrganizationalUnit [-AuthType {Negotiate | Basic}] [-Credential PSCredential] [-Partition string] [-Properties string[]] [-Server string] [CommonParameters] Get-ADOrganizationalUnit -Filterstring [-ResultPageSize int] [-ResultSetSize Int32] [-SearchBase string] [-SearchScope {Base | OneLevel | Subtree}] [-AuthType {Negotiate | Basic}] [-Credential PSCredential] [-Partition string] [-Properties string[]] [-Server string] [CommonParameters] Get-ADOrganizationalUnit -LDAPFilterstring [-ResultPageSize int] [-ResultSetSize Int32] [-SearchBase string] [-SearchScope {Base | OneLevel | Subtree}] [-AuthType {Negotiate | Basic}] [-Credential PSCredential] [-Partition string] [-Properties string[]] [-Server string] [CommonParameters] Key -AuthType {Negotiate | Basic} The authentication method to use: Negotiate (or 0), Basic (or 1) A Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) connection is required for Basic authentication. -Credential PSCredential The user account credentials to use to perform this task. The default credentials are those of the currently logged on user unless the cmdlet is run from an Active Directory PowerShell provider drive. If the cmdlet is run from such a provider drive, the account associated with the drive is the default. Type a user name, such as "User64" or "Domain64\User64" or specify a PSCredential object such as one generated by Get-Credential If a user name is specified, the cmdlet will prompt for a password. -Filter string A query string that retrieves Active Directory objects. This string uses the PowerShell Expression Language syntax: filter ::= "{" FilterComponentList"}" FilterComponentList ::= FilterComponent | FilterComponent JoinOperator FilterComponent | NotOperator FilterComponentFilterComponent ::= attr FilterOperator value | "(" FilterComponent")" FilterOperator ::= "-eq" | "-le" | "-ge" | "-ne" | "-lt" | "-gt"| "-approx" | "-bor" | "-band" | "-recursivematch" | "-like" | "-notlike" JoinOperator ::= "-and" | "-or" NotOperator ::= "-not" attr ::= PropertyName | LDAP_Name_of_the_attributevalue::= <compare this value with an attr by using the specified FilterOperator> -Identity ADOrganizationalUnit An AD organizational unit object. Most often this will be a Distinguished Name (e.g. OU=demo,DC=SS64,DC=com) The identity may also be given as a GUID, Security Identifier or sAMAccountName. The cmdlet searches the default naming context or partition to find the object. If two or more objects are found, the cmdlet returns a non-terminating error. The ADGroup object may also be passed through the pipeline or set via a variable. -LDAPFilter string An LDAP query string that is used to filter AD objects. Use this parameter to run existing LDAP queries. See also Help about_ActiveDirectory_Filter. For example to search an OU for names beginning with "Teresa". -LDAPFilter "(name=Teresa*)" -SearchScope Subtree -SearchBase "DC=demo,DC=SS64,DC=com" -Partition string The distinguished name of an AD partition. string must be one of the naming contexts on the current directory server. The cmdlet searches this partition to find the object defined by the -Identity parameter. Examples: -Partition "CN=Configuration,DC=Europe,DC=Test,DC=SS64,DC=COM" -Partition "CN=Schema,CN=Configuration,DC=Europe,DC=Test,DC=SS64,DC=COM" In many cases, a default value will be used for -Partition if no value is specified. -Properties string[] The properties of the output object to retrieve from the server (comma-separated list). Use this parameter to retrieve properties that are not included in the default set. To discover the properties available, use Get-Member To display all of the attributes that are set on the object, specify * (asterisk). Specify the property Name or for non default/extended properties, the LDAP provider Name of the attribute. -ResultPageSize int The number of objects to include in each page for an AD Domain Services query. default = 256 -ResultSetSize Int32 The maximum number of objects to return for an AD Domain Services query. To receive all objects, set this to $null. Ctrl+c will stop the query and return of objects. default = $null. -SearchBase string An Active Directory path to search under. e.g. -SearchBase "ou=training,dc=demo,dc=ss64,dc=com" -SearchScope The scope of an AD search. Possible values for this parameter are: Base or 0 Search only the current path or object. OneLevel or 1 Search the immediate children Subtree or 2 Search the current path/object and all children -Server string The AD Domain Services instance to connect to, this may be a Fully qualified domain name, NetBIOS name, Fully qualified directory server name (with or without port number)

Get-ADOrganizationalUnit gets an OU object or performs a search to retrieve multiple OUs.

The -Identity parameter specifies the AD OU to retrieve. Identify an organizational unit by its distinguished name (DN) or GUID. Alternatively set the parameter to an organizational unit object variable or pass an organizational unit object through the pipeline.

To search for and retrieve more than one organizational unit, use the -Filter or -LDAPFilter parameters. The Filter parameter uses the PowerShell Expression Language to write query strings for Active Directory. For more information about the Filter parameter syntax, see help about_ActiveDirectory_Filter. If you have existing LDAP query strings, you can use the LDAPFilter parameter.

This cmdlet retrieves a default set of organizational unit object properties. To retrieve additional properties use the -Properties parameter.

Examples

Get all the Organizational Units in the domain:

PS C:\> Get-ADOrganizationalUnit -Filter 'Name -like "*"' | FT Name, DistinguishedName -A

Gets the Organizational Unit with DistinguishedName 'OU=Sydney,OU=Demo,DC=SS64,DC=COM':

PS C:\> Get-ADOrganizationalUnit -Identity 'OU=Sydney,OU=Demo,DC=SS64,DC=COM' | FT Name,Country,PostalCode,City,StreetAddress,State -A

Gets OUs underneath the 'Sydney' Organizational Unit using an LDAP filter:

PS C:\> Get-ADOrganizationalUnit -LDAPFilter '(name=*)' -SearchBase 'OU=Sydney,OU=Demo,DC=SS64,DC=COM' -SearchScope OneLevel | FT Name,Country,PostalCode,City,StreetAddress,State

“Go where he will, the wise man is at home” ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson

Related PowerShell Cmdlets:

New-adOrganizationalUnit - Create a new AD OU.
Remove-adOrganizationalUnit - Remove an AD OU.
Set-adOrganizationalUnit - Modify an AD OU.


 

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In this article, I’ll show you how to create and manage Organizational Units using Windows PowerShell.

Organizational Units (OUs) are special containers in Active Directory (AD) that can be used to help you manage objects like computers and users. For example, you might create an OU to manage all SQL database servers or domain controllers. Using PowerShell, you can create, rename, move, and delete OUs. You can also use PowerShell to move AD objects between OUs and link Group Policy Objects to them.

Create an OU

Let’s start off by creating a new OU using New-ADOrganiaztionalUnit. You need to run the following commands on a device that has the Active Directory module for PowerShell installed and you must be logged in with an account that has permission to modify AD. The command below creates an OU called Finance, which is protected from accidental deletion, in the Departments OU located in the ad.contoso.com domain.

Both the -Path and -ProtectedFromAccidentalDeletion parameters are optional. If you don’t include a path, then the new OU will be created in the AD root. You can remove accidental deletion protection on an OU using Set-ADOrganizationalUnit:

Move an OU

Use the Move-ADObject cmdlet to move an OU as shown below. If the OU you want to move has its ‘Protected from accidental deletion’ flag set to ‘True’, before running the move command you’ll need to disable the flag using Set-ADOrganizationalUnit. The command moves the Finance OU from the Departments to the Sensitive OU.

Rename an OU

The following command renames the Finance OU to Accounts:

Link a Group Policy Object to an OU

Organizations commonly manage servers and end-user devices with Group Policy. You can link Group Policy Objects (GPOs) to OUs using the New-GPLink cmdlet. The command below links a GPO, called ‘Sensitive PCs’, to the Accounts OU. The -LinkEnabled and -Enforced parameters control whether the GPO will be processed on objects in the OU and whether it can be blocked by GPOs linked to a lower container or OU.

Optionally, the -Order parameter lets you specify a number between one and the number of GPO links on the target OU, site, or domain. The higher the number, the higher priority the GPO gets during processing. The code below lists any GPOs linked to the Accounts OU, starting with the GPO that has the lowest priority.

Move AD Objects to an OU

Again, using the Move-ADObject cmdlet, you can move computer and user objects to an OU. Note here that CN is used instead of OU in front of the username object and Users container name. The command moves David Smith’s user account from the Users container to the Accounts OU.

Delete an OU

Finally, let’s delete the Accounts OU using the Remove-ADOrganizationalUnit cmdlet.

The -Recursive parameter removes all child objects regardless of whether they are protected from deletion. Unless the OU has no child objects, you must specify the -Recursive parameter.

Conclusion

An important part of managing OUs is being able to determine whenever any unwanted changes are made to the OUs themselves or the surrounding permissions. PowerShell is very limited when it comes to this kind of organizational unit change auditing. Lepide Active Directory Auditor (part of Lepide Data Security Platform) will enable you to track all modifications and permission changes to OUs, to ensure that nothing untoward is taking place in your critical Active Directory environment.

Download Lepide Active Directory Auditor

Related PowerShell How-tos

Sours: https://www.lepide.com/how-to/managing-ous-with-windows-powershell.html
Using PowerShell - Find all computers belong an OU

PowerShell - Get a list of my domain Organizational Units

Quick post, last week my coworker Andrey needed to list all the Organization Units in the domain by Canonical Name. I thought sharing the PowerShell One-Liner magic could save time to some people out there.

In the following examples two methods to retrieve the information usingActive Directory and ADSI/NET.

Active Directory Module

I found two ways to get this information using this module

    First we need to verify if the module is loaded and then search for Cmdlet that could meet our needs.

    Get_a_list_of_my_domain_Organizational_Units

    Get-ADOrganizationalUnit

    The Get-ADOrganizational unit cmdlet gets an organizational unit object or performs a search to retrieve multiple organizational units.

    Straight forward, we look for the properties available to us.

    Output:

    Now we just have to filter on the property .

    Output:

    The cmdlet gets an Active Directory object or performs a search to retrieve multiple objects.

    Get_a_list_of_my_domain_Organizational_Units

    Output:

    Finally, the ADSI method! This technique is a bit more complex, but this does not require any module/snapin and can be run from PowerShell without any pre-requisites.

    Get_a_list_of_my_domain_Organizational_Units

    Sours: https://lazywinadmin.com/2014/04/powershell-get-list-of-my-domain.html

    Powershell get ou

    Get-ADOrganizationalUnit

    Gets one or more Active Directory organizational units.

    Syntax

    Description

    The Get-ADOrganizationalUnit cmdlet gets an organizational unit (OU) object or performs a search to get multiple OUs.

    The Identity parameter specifies the Active Directory OU to get. You can identify an OU by its distinguished name or GUID. You can also set the parameter to an OU object variable, such as or pass an OU object through the pipeline to the Identity parameter.

    To search for and retrieve more than one OU, use the Filter or LDAPFilter parameters. The Filter parameter uses the PowerShell Expression Language to write query strings for Active Directory. PowerShell Expression Language syntax provides rich type conversion support for value types received by the Filter parameter. For more information about the Filter parameter syntax, type . If you have existing Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) query strings, you can use the LDAPFilter parameter.

    This cmdlet gets a default set of OU object properties. To get additional properties, use the Properties parameter. For more information about the how to determine the properties for computer objects, see the Properties parameter description.

    Examples

    Example 1: Get all of the OUs in a domain

    This command gets all of the OUs in a domain.

    Example 2: Get an OU by its distinguished name

    This command gets the OU with the distinguished name OU=AsiaPacific,OU=Sales,OU=UserAccounts,DC=FABRIKAM,DC=COM.

    Example 3: Get child OUs

    This command gets OUs underneath the Sales OU using an LDAP filter.

    Parameters

    -AuthType

    Specifies the authentication method to use. The acceptable values for this parameter are:

    • Negotiate or 0
    • Basic or 1

    The default authentication method is Negotiate.

    A Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) connection is required for the Basic authentication method.

    Type:ADAuthType
    Accepted values:Negotiate, Basic
    Position:Named
    Default value:None
    Accept pipeline input:False
    Accept wildcard characters:False

    -Credential

    Specifies the user account credentials to use to perform this task. The default credentials are the credentials of the currently logged on user unless the cmdlet is run from an Active Directory module for Windows PowerShell provider drive. If the cmdlet is run from such a provider drive, the account associated with the drive is the default.

    To specify this parameter, you can type a user name, such as User1 or Domain01\User01 or you can specify a PSCredential object. If you specify a user name for this parameter, the cmdlet prompts for a password.

    You can also create a PSCredential object by using a script or by using the Get-Credential cmdlet. You can then set the Credential parameter to the PSCredential object.

    If the acting credentials do not have directory-level permission to perform the task, Active Directory module for Windows PowerShell returns a terminating error.

    Type:PSCredential
    Position:Named
    Default value:None
    Accept pipeline input:False
    Accept wildcard characters:False

    -Filter

    Specifies a query string that retrieves Active Directory objects. This string uses the PowerShell Expression Language syntax. The PowerShell Expression Language syntax provides rich type-conversion support for value types received by the Filter parameter. The syntax uses an in-order representation, which means that the operator is placed between the operand and the value. For more information about the Filter parameter, type .

    Syntax:

    The following syntax uses Backus-Naur form to show how to use the PowerShell Expression Language for this parameter.

    <filter> ::= "{" <FilterComponentList> "}"

    <FilterComponentList> ::= <FilterComponent> | <FilterComponent> <JoinOperator> <FilterComponent> | <NotOperator> <FilterComponent>

    <FilterComponent> ::= <attr> <FilterOperator> <value> | "(" <FilterComponent> ")"

    <FilterOperator> ::= "-eq" | "-le" | "-ge" | "-ne" | "-lt" | "-gt"| "-approx" | "-bor" | "-band" | "-recursivematch" | "-like" | "-notlike"

    <JoinOperator> ::= "-and" | "-or"

    <NotOperator> ::= "-not"

    <attr> ::= <PropertyName> | <LDAPDisplayName of the attribute>

    <value>::= <compare this value with an <attr> by using the specified <FilterOperator>>

    For a list of supported types for <value>, type .

    Note: PowerShell wildcards other than *, such as ?, are not supported by the Filter syntax.

    Note: To query using LDAP query strings, use the LDAPFilter parameter.

    Type:String
    Position:Named
    Default value:None
    Accept pipeline input:False
    Accept wildcard characters:False

    -Identity

    Specifies an Active Directory organizational unit object by providing one of the following values. The identifier in parentheses is the LDAP display name for the attribute. The acceptable values for this parameter are:

    • A distinguished name
    • A GUID (objectGUID)
    • A security identifier (objectSid)
    • A Security Account Manager account name (sAMAccountName)

    The cmdlet searches the default naming context or partition to find the object. If two or more objects are found, the cmdlet returns a non-terminating error.

    This parameter can also get this object through the pipeline or you can set this parameter to an object instance.

    Type:ADOrganizationalUnit
    Position:0
    Default value:None
    Accept pipeline input:True
    Accept wildcard characters:False

    -LDAPFilter

    Specifies an LDAP query string that is used to filter Active Directory objects. You can use this parameter to run your existing LDAP queries. The Filter parameter syntax supports the same functionality as the LDAP syntax. For more information, see the Filter parameter description or type .

    Type:String
    Position:Named
    Default value:None
    Accept pipeline input:False
    Accept wildcard characters:False

    -Partition

    Specifies the distinguished name of an Active Directory partition. The distinguished name must be one of the naming contexts on the current directory server. The cmdlet searches this partition to find the object defined by the Identity parameter.

    In many cases, a default value is used for the Partition parameter if no value is specified. The rules for determining the default value are given below. Note that rules listed first are evaluated first and once a default value can be determined, no further rules are evaluated.

    In Active Directory Domain Services environments, a default value for Partition is set in the following cases:

    • If the Identity parameter is set to a distinguished name, the default value of Partition is automatically generated from this distinguished name.
    • If running cmdlets from an Active Directory provider drive, the default value of Partition is automatically generated from the current path in the drive.
    • If none of the previous cases apply, the default value of Partition is set to the default partition or naming context of the target domain.

    In Active Directory Lightweight Directory Services (AD LDS) environments, a default value for Partition is set in the following cases:

    • If the Identity parameter is set to a distinguished name, the default value of Partition is automatically generated from this distinguished name.
    • If running cmdlets from an Active Directory provider drive, the default value of Partition is automatically generated from the current path in the drive.
    • If the target AD LDS instance has a default naming context, the default value of Partition is set to the default naming context. To specify a default naming context for an AD LDS environment, set the msDS-defaultNamingContext property of the Active Directory directory service agent (DSA) object (nTDSDSA) for the AD LDS instance.
    • If none of the previous cases apply, the Partition parameter will not take any default value.
    Type:String
    Position:Named
    Default value:None
    Accept pipeline input:False
    Accept wildcard characters:False

    -Properties

    Specifies the properties of the output object to retrieve from the server. Use this parameter to retrieve properties that are not included in the default set.

    Specify properties for this parameter as a comma-separated list of names. To display all of the attributes that are set on the object, specify * (asterisk).

    To specify an individual extended property, use the name of the property. For properties that are not default or extended properties, you must specify the LDAP display name of the attribute.

    To retrieve properties and display them for an object, you can use the Get-* cmdlet associated with the object and pass the output to the Get-Member cmdlet.

    Type:String[]
    Aliases:Property
    Position:Named
    Default value:None
    Accept pipeline input:False
    Accept wildcard characters:False

    -ResultPageSize

    Specifies the number of objects to include in one page for an AD DS query.

    The default is 256 objects per page.

    Type:Int32
    Position:Named
    Default value:None
    Accept pipeline input:False
    Accept wildcard characters:False

    -ResultSetSize

    Specifies the maximum number of objects to return for an AD DS query. If you want to receive all of the objects, set this parameter to $Null (null value). You can use Ctrl+C to stop the query and return of objects.

    The default is $Null.

    Type:Int32
    Position:Named
    Default value:None
    Accept pipeline input:False
    Accept wildcard characters:False

    -SearchBase

    Specifies an Active Directory path to search.

    When you run a cmdlet from an Active Directory provider drive, the default value of this parameter is the current path of the drive.

    When you run a cmdlet outside of an Active Directory provider drive against an AD DS target, the default value of this parameter is the default naming context of the target domain.

    When you run a cmdlet outside of an Active Directory provider drive against an AD LDS target, the default value is the default naming context of the target AD LDS instance if one has been specified by setting the msDS-defaultNamingContext property of the Active Directory directory service agent object (nTDSDSA) for the AD LDS instance. If no default naming context has been specified for the target AD LDS instance, then this parameter has no default value.

    When the value of the SearchBase parameter is set to an empty string and you are connected to a global catalog (GC) port, all partitions are searched. If the value of the SearchBase parameter is set to an empty string and you are not connected to a GC port, an error is thrown.

    Type:String
    Position:Named
    Default value:None
    Accept pipeline input:False
    Accept wildcard characters:False

    -SearchScope

    Specifies the scope of an Active Directory search. The acceptable values for this parameter are:

    • Base or 0
    • OneLevel or 1
    • Subtree or 2

    A Base query searches only the current path or object. A OneLevel query searches the immediate children of that path or object. A Subtree query searches the current path or object and all children of that path or object.

    Type:ADSearchScope
    Accepted values:Base, OneLevel, Subtree
    Position:Named
    Default value:None
    Accept pipeline input:False
    Accept wildcard characters:False

    -Server

    Specifies the AD DS instance to connect to, by providing one of the following values for a corresponding domain name or directory server. The service may be any of the following: AD LDS, AD DS, or Active Directory snapshot instance.

    Specify the AD DS instance in one of the following ways:

    Domain name values:

    • Fully qualified domain name
    • NetBIOS name

    Directory server values:

    • Fully qualified directory server name
    • NetBIOS name
    • Fully qualified directory server name and port

    The default value for this parameter is determined by one of the following methods in the order that they are listed:

    • By using the Server value from objects passed through the pipeline
    • By using the server information associated with the AD DS Windows PowerShell provider drive, when the cmdlet runs in that drive
    • By using the domain of the computer running Windows PowerShell
    Type:String
    Position:Named
    Default value:None
    Accept pipeline input:False
    Accept wildcard characters:False

    Inputs

    None or Microsoft.ActiveDirectory.Management.ADOrganizationalUnit

    An OU object is received by the Identity parameter.

    Outputs

    ADOrganizationalUnit

    Returns one or more OU objects.

    This cmdlet returns a default set of ADOrganizational property values. To retrieve additional ADOrganizational properties, use the Properties parameter.

    To view the properties for an ADOrganizational object, see the following examples. To run these examples, replace <organizational unit> with an OU identifier such as the distinguished name of an OU.

    To get a list of the default set of properties of an ADOrganizational object, use the following command:

    <organizational unit>

    To get a list of all the properties of an ADOrganizational object, use the following command:

    <organizational unit>

    Related Links

    Sours: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/powershell/module/activedirectory/get-adorganizationalunit
    Easily Export Users from Active Directory OU with Powershell - Windows Server 2012 R2 / 2016

    We like to get a list of all the Organizational Units (OUs) in Active Directory and export it with PowerShell. Why do we need that? We like to clean up not used OUs. This article will teach you how to display and export a list of Organizational Units with PowerShell.

    Get a list of all Organizational Units with PowerShell

    Run PowerShell as administrator. Get a list of all the OUs in Active Directory. We will make use of the Get-ADOrganizationalUnit cmdlet. Let’s sort on CanonicalName. This will show us an OU breakdown structure and is easier to read.

    The output with all the OUs in AD is a good list. But how do we know if there are users present in the OU?

    Get a list of all Organizational Units including UserCount with PowerShell

    We like to get a list of the OUs, including user count with PowerShell. This will show us if there are users present in the OU. Copy and paste the below code. Run it in PowerShell ISE.

    It will show an output with a column UserCount. If the UserCount value is showing 0, it means that there are no users in the OU. Note: it will not show if there is a computer object in the OU. This will only check and show a count for users.

    Get a list of all Organizational Units including ComputerCount with PowerShell

    We like to get a list of the OUs, including computer count with PowerShell.

    The output will show a column ComputerCount.

    Export OUs in AD to a text file or CSV file with PowerShell

    Now that we have the list of OUs in AD shown, we like to export it to a file. The script will get the Organizational Units with PowerShell and export it to a text file.

    If you like to export to a CSV file, change the last line to:

    After running the above command, find the exported file in the C:\ drive. I opened the text file export_OUs.txt.

    Get Organizational Units (ous) with PowerShell text output

    Keep reading: Bulk move AD users to another OU with PowerShell »

    Conclusion

    To sum it up, you learned how to get Organizational Units with PowerShell. You also learned how to find empty OUs. As of last, you learned how to export OUs to a text file or CSV file with PowerShell.

    Did you enjoy this article? If so, you may like Hide mail-enabled security group from GAL with PowerShell. Don’t forget to follow us and share this article.

    Active DirectoryPowerShellWindowsWindows Server

    ALI TAJRAN

    ALI TAJRAN

    ALI TAJRAN is a passionate IT Architect, IT Consultant, and Microsoft Certified Trainer. He started Information Technology at a very young age, and his goal is to teach and inspire others. Read more »

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    Sours: https://www.alitajran.com/get-organizational-units-with-powershell/

    Similar news:

    Get-OrganizationalUnit

    This cmdlet is available in on-premises Exchange and in the cloud-based service. Some parameters and settings may be exclusive to one environment or the other.

    Use the Get-OrganizationalUnit cmdlet to view a list of organizational units (OUs) that exist in your organization.

    For information about the parameter sets in the Syntax section below, see Exchange cmdlet syntax.

    Syntax

    Description

    The Get-OrganizationalUnit cmdlet is used by the Exchange admin center to populate fields that display OU information.

    You need to be assigned permissions before you can run this cmdlet. Although this topic lists all parameters for the cmdlet, you may not have access to some parameters if they're not included in the permissions assigned to you. To find the permissions required to run any cmdlet or parameter in your organization, see Find the permissions required to run any Exchange cmdlet.

    Examples

    Example 1

    This example retrieves a list of the first level child OUs beneath the North America OU and formats the output so that only the Name and DistinguishedName properties are displayed.

    For more information about pipelining and the Format-Table cmdlet, see About Pipelines and Working with command output.

    Example 2

    This example retrieves a list of OUs that match the text string "Executives" and formats the output so that only the Name and DistinguishedName properties are displayed.

    For more information about pipelining and the Format-Table cmdlet, see About Pipelines and Working with command output.

    Parameters

    -DomainController

    This parameter is available only in on-premises Exchange.

    The DomainController parameter specifies the domain controller that's used by this cmdlet to read data from or write data to Active Directory. You identify the domain controller by its fully qualified domain name (FQDN). For example, dc01.contoso.com.

    Type:Fqdn
    Position:Named
    Default value:None
    Accept pipeline input:False
    Accept wildcard characters:False
    Applies to:Exchange Server 2010, Exchange Server 2013, Exchange Server 2016, Exchange Server 2019

    -Identity

    The Identity parameter specifies the OU or domain that you want to view. You can use any value that uniquely identifies the OU or domain. For example:

    • Name
    • Canonical name
    • Distinguished name (DN)
    • GUID

    You can use this parameter with the SearchText parameter.

    Type:ExtendedOrganizationalUnitIdParameter
    Position:1
    Default value:None
    Accept pipeline input:True
    Accept wildcard characters:False
    Applies to:Exchange Server 2010, Exchange Server 2013, Exchange Server 2016, Exchange Server 2019, Exchange Online

    -IncludeContainers

    The IncludeContainers switch instructs the command to return containers in the results. You don't need to specify a value with this switch.

    Type:SwitchParameter
    Position:Named
    Default value:None
    Accept pipeline input:False
    Accept wildcard characters:False
    Applies to:Exchange Server 2010, Exchange Server 2013, Exchange Server 2016, Exchange Server 2019, Exchange Online

    -ResultSize

    The ResultSize parameter specifies the maximum number of results to return. If you want to return all requests that match the query, use unlimited for the value of this parameter. The default value is 1000.

    Type:Unlimited
    Position:Named
    Default value:None
    Accept pipeline input:False
    Accept wildcard characters:False
    Applies to:Exchange Server 2013, Exchange Server 2016, Exchange Server 2019, Exchange Online

    -SearchText

    The SearchText parameter enables you to search the names of all OUs in your organization for the specified string. Only the OUs that match the string you specify are returned. If the string you specify contains spaces, enclose it in quotation marks (").

    You can't use this parameter with the Identity parameter.

    Type:String
    Position:Named
    Default value:None
    Accept pipeline input:False
    Accept wildcard characters:False
    Applies to:Exchange Server 2013, Exchange Server 2016, Exchange Server 2019, Exchange Online

    -SingleNodeOnly

    The SingleNodeOnly switch instructs the command to return only the first level child OUs beneath the OU specified in the Identity parameter. You don't need to specify a value with this switch.

    Type:SwitchParameter
    Position:Named
    Default value:None
    Accept pipeline input:False
    Accept wildcard characters:False
    Applies to:Exchange Server 2010, Exchange Server 2013, Exchange Server 2016, Exchange Server 2019, Exchange Online

    Inputs

    To see the input types that this cmdlet accepts, see Cmdlet Input and Output Types. If the Input Type field for a cmdlet is blank, the cmdlet doesn't accept input data.

    Outputs

    To see the return types, which are also known as output types, that this cmdlet accepts, see Cmdlet Input and Output Types. If the Output Type field is blank, the cmdlet doesn't return data.

    Sours: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/powershell/module/exchange/get-organizationalunit


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