Taro medication

Taro medication DEFAULT

 
Find out how to get your flu shot today
*Availability may fluctuate based on provincial supply; wait times will vary.

     

TARO DOCUSATE SODIUM, 100MG, CAPSULE

Common uses

This medication is a stool softener. Typically, it is used to ease constipation. It requires several days to take effect.

How to use this medication

This medication is typically used only once a day. However, your doctor or pharmacist may have suggested a different schedule that is more appropriate for you. It is not advisable to chew, crush or open the capsule of this medication since it has an unpleasant taste.

This medication may be taken with or without food. It is recommended to drink plenty of water while using this medication.

Possible side effects

In addition to its desired action, this medication may cause some side effects, notably:

  • it may cause stomach ache and cramps.
Each person may react differently to a treatment. If you think this medication may be causing side effects (including those described here, or others), talk to your doctor or pharmacist. He or she can help you to determine whether or not the medication is the source of the problem.

Storage information

As with most medications, this product should be stored at room temperature. Store it in a secure location where it will not be exposed to excessive heat, moisture or direct sunlight. Keep it out of reach of young children. Make sure that any leftover portion is disposed of safely.

General information

It is important to tell the health professionals you consult:

  • if you have a history of any other medical condition, whether you smoke and for women, if you are or want to become pregnant or breastfeeding;
  • if you have allergies to any medications or any other allergies (e.g. to food, latex, etc.);
  • all medications you are taking, prescription and non-prescription, including vitamins and natural products and supplements.

This document contains useful information for those taking this medication. It is not intended, in any way, to replace the advice of a trained health professional. For more information, consult the manufacturer's literature, where you will find additional information about uncommon side effects as well as contraindications associated with this product.

© Copyright Vigilance Santé

The patient information leaflets are provided by Vigilance Santé Inc. This content is for information purposes only and does not in any manner whatsoever replace the opinion or advice of your health care professional. Always consult a health care professional before making a decision about your medication or treatment.

Sours: https://www.medicineshoppe.ca/en/article/taro-docusate-sodium

Taro Pharmaceutical Industries

Banner 1

Growth Through Research

Taro's investments in research have enabled it to become a U.S. leader in topical prescription products (creams, ointments and gels). Approximately 1 in 8 tubes of such products sold in the U.S.

READ MORE ABOUT TARO

Banner 2

High-Quality Products

Taro develops high-quality, proprietary and off-patent pharmaceuticals for markets in the US, Canada, Israel and other countries around the world.

READ MORE

Banner 3

Leading Manufacturer

We are a leading manufacturer and supplier of topical dermatological products and also have a growing line of solid dosage form products used mainly in cardiology and neurology.

READ MORE

  • Research & Development
  • Taro       Products
  • Investor Relations

Taro is a research-based international pharmaceutical company that was established on the principal that research and development would be the cornerstone of its growth strategy. Providing quality products through scientific innovations, diligence and precision is the goal of all of Taro's research programs.

Taro develops high-quality, proprietary and off-patent pharmaceuticals for markets in the US, Canada, Israel and other countries around the world...

Read More

Established in 1950, Taro Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. is a research-based, international, specialty pharmaceutical company that develops, manufactures and markets prescription and over-the-counter pharmaceutical products. Taro’s research programs and niche strategy have enabled the Company to achieve leadership in dermatological products in the U.S.

ENTER

Sours: https://www.taro.com/
  1. Kevin cullen wife
  2. Navitas controller app
  3. Best tonal workouts
  4. Epic channel art
  5. Darling homes dfw

How does this medication work? What will it do for me?

Enalapril belongs to the class of medications called angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors. It is used to treat high blood pressure and congestive heart failure.

This medication works by relaxing blood vessels and by making the heart pump more efficiently. The injectable form is used to lower high blood pressure when the oral form cannot be used.

This medication may be available under multiple brand names and/or in several different forms. Any specific brand name of this medication may not be available in all of the forms or approved for all of the conditions discussed here. As well, some forms of this medication may not be used for all of the conditions discussed here.

Your doctor may have suggested this medication for conditions other than those listed in these drug information articles. If you have not discussed this with your doctor or are not sure why you are being given this medication, speak to your doctor. Do not stop using this medication without consulting your doctor.

Do not give this medication to anyone else, even if they have the same symptoms as you do. It can be harmful for people to use this medication if their doctor has not prescribed it.

What form(s) does this medication come in?

2.5 mg
Each white, oval-shaped tablet scored and engraved on one side with "T" and "2.5" contains 2.5 mg of enalapril maleate. Nonmedicinal ingredients: lactose, magnesium stearate, pregelatinized corn starch, sodium bicarbonate, and red or yellow iron oxides.

5 mg
Each white, rounded triangle-shaped tablet scored on one side and engraved "Taro" over "5" on the other contains 5 mg of enalapril maleate. Nonmedicinal ingredients: lactose, magnesium stearate, pregelatinized corn starch, sodium bicarbonate, and red or yellow iron oxides.

10 mg
Each pink, rounded triangle-shaped tablet scored on one side and engraved "Taro" over "10" on the other contains 10 mg of enalapril maleate. Nonmedicinal ingredients: lactose, magnesium stearate, pregelatinized corn starch, sodium bicarbonate, and red or yellow iron oxides.

20 mg
Each peach, rounded triangle-shaped tablet scored on one side and engraved "Taro" over "20" on the other contains 20 mg of enalapril maleate. Nonmedicinal ingredients: lactose, magnesium stearate, pregelatinized corn starch, sodium bicarbonate, and red or yellow iron oxides.

How should I use this medication?

The recommended starting dose for high blood pressure is 2.5 mg to 5 mg taken once a day. The usual treatment dose ranges from 2.5 mg once daily to 20 mg twice daily, depending on the needs and circumstances of the person using the medication. The dose may need to be adjusted according to how well the kidneys are functioning and the effectiveness of the medication.

The starting dose for children less than 16 years of age is based on body weight and will be calculated by your child’s doctor.

The recommended starting dose to treat congestive heart failure is 2.5 mg taken once a day. The dose may be increased gradually to a maximum of 40 mg daily, depending on the effectiveness of the medication.

Many things can affect the dose of medication that a person needs, such as body weight, other medical conditions, and other medications. If your doctor has recommended a dose different from the ones listed here, do not change the way that you are using the medication without consulting your doctor.

It is important to use this medication exactly as prescribed by your doctor. If you miss a dose, and it is within 6 hours of your regularly scheduled time, administer it as soon as possible and continue with your regular schedule. If more than 6 hours has passed, skip the missed dose and continue with your regular dosing schedule. Do not administer a double dose to make up for a missed one.If you are not sure what to do after missing a dose, contact your doctor or pharmacist for advice.

Store this medication at room temperature, protect it from moisture and keep out of reach of children.

Do not dispose of medications in wastewater (e.g. down the sink or in the toilet) or in household garbage. Ask your pharmacist how to dispose of medications that are no longer needed or have expired.

Who should NOT take this medication?

Do not take this medication if you:

  • are allergic to enalapril or any ingredients of the medication
  • are pregnant or planning to get pregnant
  • have been diagnosed with hereditary angioedema
  • have had angioedema (a serious allergic reaction which causes the area around the throat and tongue to swell) after taking any other ACE inhibitors (e.g., captopril, enalapril, ramipril)
  • have diabetes or kidney disease and are taking aliskiren

What side effects are possible with this medication?

Many medications can cause side effects. A side effect is an unwanted response to a medication when it is taken in normal doses. Side effects can be mild or severe, temporary or permanent.

The side effects listed below are not experienced by everyone who takes this medication. If you are concerned about side effects, discuss the risks and benefits of this medication with your doctor.

The following side effects have been reported by at least 1% of people taking this medication. Many of these side effects can be managed, and some may go away on their own over time.

Contact your doctor if you experience these side effects and they are severe or bothersome. Your pharmacist may be able to advise you on managing side effects.

  • abdominal pain
  • cough (dry, persistent)
  • diarrhea
  • fatigue
  • headache
  • loss of appetite
  • nausea
  • rash
  • sore throat
  • vomiting

Although most of these side effects listed below don't happen very often, they could lead to serious problems if you do not seek medical attention.

Check with your doctor as soon as possible if any of the following side effects occur:

  • chest pain
  • dizziness, lightheadedness, or fainting (signs of low blood pressure)
  • flu-like symptoms (sudden lack of energy, fever, cough, sore throat)
  • shortness of breath
  • signs of  liver problems (e.g., nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, loss of appetite, weight loss, yellowing of the skin or whites of the eyes, dark urine, pale stools)
  • signs of too much potassium in the body (e.g., confusion; irregular heartbeat; nervousness; numbness or tingling in the hands, feet, or lips; shortness of breath or difficulty breathing; weakness or heaviness of legs)
  • symptoms of low blood sugar (e.g., cold sweat, cool pale skin, headache, fast heart beat, weakness

Stop taking the medication and seek immediate medical attention if any of the following occur:

  • signs of angioedema (e.g., swelling of face, mouth, hands, or feet)

Some people may experience side effects other than those listed. Check with your doctor if you notice any symptom that worries you while you are taking this medication.

Are there any other precautions or warnings for this medication?

HEALTH CANADA ADVISORY

February 4, 2014

Health Canada has issued new restrictions concerning the use of enalapril. To read the full Health Canada Advisory, visit Health Canada's web site at www.hc-sc.gc.ca.

Before you begin using a medication, be sure to inform your doctor of any medical conditions or allergies you may have, any medications you are taking, whether you are pregnant or breast-feeding, and any other significant facts about your health. These factors may affect how you should use this medication.

Angioedema: Angioedema (a serious allergic reaction that causes the area around the throat and tongue to swell) may occur with ACE inhibitors, including enalapril, although uncommonly. If you experience swelling of the face, tongue, or throat, you should stop taking this medication at once and get immediate medical attention. People who have had angioedema caused by other substances may be at increased risk of angioedema while receiving an ACE inhibitor such as enalapril.

Cough: People taking enalapril may develop a dry, persistent cough that usually disappears only after stopping or lowering the enalapril dose. Be sure to tell your doctor of any cough that does not seem to be related to a usual cause.

Diabetes: Enalapril may cause a loss of blood glucose control, and glucose tolerance may change.People with diabetes may find it necessary to monitor their blood sugar more frequently while using this medication. If you have diabetes or are at risk for developing diabetes, discuss with your doctor how this medication may affect your medical condition, how your medical condition may affect the dosing and effectiveness of this medication, and whether any special monitoring is needed.

Kidney function: Changes in kidney function have been seen in certain people taking this medication. The use of diuretics (water pills) or aliskiren may further increase the risk of kidney problems for those already at risk for this problem. If you have kidney disease, discuss with your doctor how this medication may affect your medical condition, how your medical condition may affect the dosing and effectiveness of this medication, and whether any special monitoring is needed.

Liver function: Changes in liver function have occurred in people with or without preexisting liver problems during treatment with this medication. In most cases, the changes were reversed when the medication was stopped. If you experience symptoms of liver problems such as fatigue, feeling unwell, loss of appetite, nausea, yellowing of the skin or whites of the eyes, dark urine, pale stools, abdominal pain or swelling, and itchy skin, contact your doctor immediately.

Low blood pressure: Occasionally, blood pressure drops too low after taking enalapril. This usually happens after the first or second dose or when the dose is increased. It is more likely to occur in those who take aliskiren, are on dialysis, are experiencing diarrhea or vomiting, are sweating excessively and not drinking enough fluids, have a salt-restricted diet, or are taking water pills. People with these conditions should be monitored closely by their doctor for the first weeks of treatment and whenever the dose of the medication is increased. To reduce the risk of dizziness, get up slowly from a lying down or sitting position. If low blood pressure causes you to faint or feel lightheaded, contact your doctor.

Excessive sweating and lack of fluid intake may lead to an excessive fall in blood pressure because of reduced fluid in your blood vessels. Vomiting or diarrhea may also lead to a fall in blood pressure. Consult your doctor if you feel your blood pressure is too low.

Potassium levels: Increases in blood levels of potassium occur for a small percentage of people taking enalapril. This rarely causes problems, but potassium levels should be monitored by your doctor. Avoid using salt substitutes that contain potassium while you are taking enalapril.

Pregnancy: ACE inhibitors such as enalapril may cause severe harm or death to the developing fetus if taken by the mother during pregnancy. This medication should not be used during pregnancy. If you become pregnant while taking this medication, contact your doctor immediately.

Breast-feeding: This medication passes into breast milk in small amounts. If you are a breast-feeding mother and are taking enalapril, it may affect your baby. Talk to your doctor about whether you should continue breast-feeding.

Children: The safety and effectiveness of this medication have not been established for infants and children with decreased kidney function.

Seniors: Seniors have an increased risk of experiencing side effects when taking enalalpril due to reduced kidney function. Lower doses may be necessary to minimize side effects.

What other drugs could interact with this medication?

There may be an interaction between enalapril and any of the following:

  • acetylsalicylic acid (ASA)
  • aldesleukin
  • aliskiren
  • allopurinol
  • alpha blockers (e.g., alfuzosin, doxazosin, tamsulosin)
  • alpha agonists (e.g., clonidine, methyldopa)
  • amifostine
  • amiodarone
  • amphetamines (e.g., dextroamphetamine, lisdexamphetamine)
  • angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs; e.g., candesartan, losartan)
  • antidiabetes medications (e.g., insulin, metformin, glyburide)
  • atypical anti-psychotics (e.g., clozapine, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone)
  • azathioprine
  • barbiturates (e.g., butalbital, pentobarbital phenobarbital)
  • beta-adrenergic blockers (e.g., atenolol, propranolol, sotalol)
  • brimonidine
  • bromocriptine
  • calcium channel blockers (e.g., amlodipine, diltiazem, nifedipine, verapamil)
  • canagliflozin
  • ciprofloxacin
  • conivaptan
  • diuretics (water pills; e.g., furosemide, hydrochlorothiazide, triamterene)
  • drospirenone
  • duloxetine
  • eplerenone
  • everolimus
  • "gliptin" diabetes medications (e.g., linagliptin, saxagliptin, sitagliptin)
  • grass pollen allergen extract
  • guanfacine
  • heparin
  • iron dextran complex
  • iron gluconate
  • levodopa
  • lithium
  • low-molecular-weight heparins (e.g., dalteparin, enoxaparin, tinzaparin)
  • medications that increase potassium levels (e.g., potassium supplements, spironolactone, amiloride, and salt substitutes containing potassium)
  • metformin
  • methylphenidate
  • minoxidil
  • nitrates (e.g., nitroglycerin, isosorbide dinitrate, isosorbide mononitrate)
  • nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs; e.g., ibuprofen, indomethacin, naproxen)
  • other angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs; e.g., captopril,  ramipril)
  • pentoxifylline
  • phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors (e.g., sildenafil, tadalafil, vardenafil)
  • pregabalin
  • quinine
  • ropinirole
  • sacubitril
  • selegiline
  • sirolimus
  • sodium phosphates
  • temsirolimus
  • tizanidine
  • tolcapone
  • tolvaptan
  • trimethoprim
  • yohimbine

If you are taking any of these medications, speak with your doctor or pharmacist. Depending on your specific circumstances, your doctor may want you to:

  • stop taking one of the medications,
  • change one of the medications to another,
  • change how you are taking one or both of the medications, or
  • leave everything as is.

An interaction between two medications does not always mean that you must stop taking one of them. Speak to your doctor about how any drug interactions are being managed or should be managed.

Medications other than those listed above may interact with this medication. Tell your doctor or prescriber about all prescription, over-the-counter (non-prescription), and herbal medications you are taking. Also tell them about any supplements you take. Since caffeine, alcohol, the nicotine from cigarettes, or street drugs can affect the action of many medications, you should let your prescriber know if you use them.

All material copyright MediResource Inc. 1996 – 2021. Terms and conditions of use. The contents herein are for informational purposes only. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Source: www.medbroadcast.com/drug/getdrug/Taro-Enalapril

Sours: https://www.medbroadcast.com/drug/getdrug/taro-enalapril
Medication Types

How does this medication work? What will it do for me?

Warfarin belongs to the class of medications called anticoagulants. It is sometimes referred to as a "blood thinner," although it does not actually thin the blood.

Warfarin helps to prevent blood clots from forming or from getting bigger, but it does not dissolve blood clots. Warfarin is used for the treatment of blood clots in the veins, arteries, lungs, and heart. It is also used to prevent clots for people with conditions that put them at an increased risk of developing blood clots (e.g., some abnormal heart rhythms [atrial fibrillation], leg circulation problems, heart attack or congestive heart failure). It is also used to reduce the risk of blood clots due to surgical procedures or trauma.

Blood clots in the circulation are dangerous because they can cause medical problems such as heart attacks, stroke, and pulmonary embolism. Warfarin helps to reduce blood clotting within 24 hours of taking the medication. The full effect may take 72 to 96 hours to occur.

Warfarin works by partially blocking the reuse of vitamin K in your liver. Vitamin K is needed to make clotting factors that help the blood to clot and prevent bleeding. Vitamin K is found naturally in foods such as leafy, green vegetables, and certain vegetable oils. If you are taking warfarin, you may continue to eat these foods, but do not make any drastic changes to your diet.

This medication may be available under multiple brand names and/or in several different forms. Any specific brand name of this medication may not be available in all of the forms or approved for all of the conditions discussed here. As well, some forms of this medication may not be used for all of the conditions discussed here.

Your doctor may have suggested this medication for conditions other than those listed in these drug information articles. If you have not discussed this with your doctor or are not sure why you are taking this medication, speak to your doctor. Do not stop taking this medication without consulting your doctor.

Do not give this medication to anyone else, even if they have the same symptoms as you do. It can be harmful for people to take this medication if their doctor has not prescribed it.

What form(s) does this medication come in?

1 mg
Each pink, single-scored tablet, with "WARFARIN1" on one side and "TARO" on the other, contains 1 mg of warfarin sodium. Nonmedicinal ingredients: D&C Red No. 6 Lake, lactose, magnesium stearate, and pregelatinized cornstarch.

2 mg
Each lavender, single-scored tablet, with "WARFARIN2" on one side and "TARO" on the other, contains 2 mg of warfarin sodium. Nonmedicinal ingredients: FD&C Blue No. 2 Lake, FD&C Red No. 40 Lake, lactose, magnesium stearate, and pregelatinized cornstarch.

2.5 mg
Each green, single-scored tablet, with "WARFARIN2½" on one side and "TARO" on the other, contains 2.5 mg of warfarin sodium. Nonmedicinal ingredients: D&C Yellow No. 10 Lake, FD&C Blue No. 2 Lake, lactose, magnesium stearate, and pregelatinized cornstarch.

3 mg
Each tan, single-scored tablet, with "WARFARIN3" on one side and "TARO" on the other, contains 3 mg of warfarin sodium. Nonmedicinal ingredients: D&C Yellow No. 10 Lake, FD&C Blue No. 2 Lake, FD&C Red No. 40 Lake, lactose, magnesium stearate, and pregelatinized cornstarch.

4 mg
Each blue, single-scored tablet, with "WARFARIN4" on one side and "TARO" on the other, contains 4 mg of warfarin sodium. Nonmedicinal ingredients: FD&C Blue No. 1 Lake, lactose, magnesium stearate, and pregelatinized cornstarch.

5 mg
Each peach, single-scored tablet, with "WARFARIN5" on one side and "TARO" on the other, contains 5 mg of warfarin sodium. Nonmedicinal ingredients: D&C Red No. 6 Lake, D&C Yellow No. 10 Lake, lactose, magnesium stearate, and pregelatinized cornstarch.

6 mg
Each teal, single-scored tablet, with "WARFARIN6" on one side and "TARO" on the other, contains 6 mg of warfarin sodium. Nonmedicinal ingredients: FD&C Blue No. 2 Lake, FD&C Yellow No. 10 Lake, lactose, magnesium stearate, and pregelatinized cornstarch.

7.5 mg
Each yellow, single-scored tablet, with "WARFARIN7½" on one side and "TARO" on the other, contains 7.5 mg of warfarin sodium. Nonmedicinal ingredients: D&C Yellow No. 10 Lake, lactose, magnesium stearate, and pregelatinized cornstarch.

10 mg
Each white, single-scored tablet, with "WARFARIN10" on one side and "TARO" on the other, contains 10 mg of warfarin sodium. Nonmedicinal ingredients: lactose, magnesium stearate, and pregelatinized cornstarch. The 10 mg does not contain dye.

How should I use this medication?

The dose of warfarin is individualized by your doctor according to blood clotting time. Blood clotting time is determined by a laboratory test, called an INR, which should be performed at regular intervals. It is very important to keep your lab appointments, as there is a narrow range between too much and too little of the medication. Too much medication may cause you to bleed more. Too little medication may lead to harmful clots forming.

Different circumstances in your life (e.g., eating certain foods or using certain medications) can cause the medication to work more or less effectively. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for a list of these foods and medications.

It is important to manage your lifestyle and habits appropriately when taking warfarin:

  • do not make drastic changes in your diet, such as eating large amounts of green, leafy vegetables
  • do not attempt to change your weight by dieting without first checking with your doctor or pharmacist
  • do not participate in any activity or sport that may result in serious injury
  • avoid drinking alcohol
  • avoid drinking cranberry juice or consuming other products that contain cranberries
  • avoid cutting yourself

It is very important that you take warfarin exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Take your dose of warfarin at the same time each day. If you miss a dose of warfarin, notify your health care provider right away. Take the missed dose as soon as possible and continue with your regular schedule. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and continue with your regular dosing schedule. Do not take a double dose to make up for a missed one. If you are not sure what to do after missing a dose, contact your doctor or pharmacist for advice.

Store this medication at room temperature, protect it from light and moisture, and keep it out of the reach of children.

Do not dispose of medications in wastewater (e.g. down the sink or in the toilet) or in household garbage. Ask your pharmacist how to dispose of medications that are no longer needed or have expired.

Who should NOT take this medication?

Do not take warfarin if you:

  • are allergic to warfarin or any ingredients of the medication
  • are pregnant
  • are undergoing certain types of surgery
  • do not have access to an adequate lab facility to get regular blood tests done
  • have a high risk of abortion, eclampsia, and preeclampsia (complications of pregnancy often associated with sudden onset of very high blood pressure)
  • have bleeding tendencies associated with active ulcers or overt bleeding of the stomach, genitourinary, or respiratory tracts; heart infection; brain aneurysm; or bleeding associated with many other medical conditions
  • have certain blood disorders
  • have malignant hypertension
  • have recently had or are planning to have surgery of the central nervous system or the eye or surgery associated with trauma resulting in large open surfaces
  • have senility, alcoholism, or psychosis, or other conditions where you may not be able to cooperate with taking the medication and having the necessary lab tests on a regular basis

Anticoagulation (blood thinning) should not take place in any situation where the risk of bleeding might be greater than the potential benefits of anticoagulation.

What side effects are possible with this medication?

Many medications can cause side-effects. A side effect is an unwanted response to a medication when it is taken in normal doses. Side effects can be mild or severe, temporary or permanent.

The side effects listed below are not experienced by everyone who takes this medication. If you are concerned about side effects, discuss the risks and benefits of this medication with your doctor.

The following side effects have been reported by at least 1% of people taking this medication. Many of these side effects can be managed, and some may go away on their own over time.

Contact your doctor if you experience these side effects and they are severe or bothersome. Your pharmacist may be able to advise you on managing side effects.

  • changes in skin colour
  • diarrhea
  • dizziness
  • fatigue
  • general feeling of being unwell
  • headache
  • nausea
  • weakness

Although most of the side effects listed below don't happen very often, they could lead to serious problems if you do not seek medical attention.

Check with your doctor as soon as possible if any of the following side effects occur:

  • heavier-than-normal menstrual bleeding
  • numbness or tingling of hands, feet, or face
  • rash or itching
  • signs of anemia (low red blood cells; e.g., dizziness, pale skin, unusual tiredness or weakness, shortness of breath)
  • signs of clotting problems (e.g., unusual nosebleeds, bruising, blood in urine, coughing blood, bleeding gums, cuts that don't stop bleeding)
  • signs of "purple toe syndrome" (e.g., changing, mottled colour of toes, pain and tenderness of toes, sores that don't heal)
  • signs of liver damage (i.e., yellowing of skin or eyes, dark urine, light-coloured stools)
  • signs of serious skin damage (e.g., sores, changed skin colour or temperature)
  • sudden shortness of breath
  • unusual pain or swelling

Stop taking the medication and seek immediate medical attention if any of the following occur:

  • fainting
  • signs of a serious allergic reaction (i.e., swelling of face or throat, hives, or difficulty breathing)
  • signs of bleeding (dark, tarry stools, bleeding in eye, blood in stools, blood in vomit or vomit that looks like coffee grounds, blood in urine, coughing up blood)
  • signs of bleeding in the brain (e.g., sudden or severe headache; sudden loss of coordination; vision changes; sudden slurring of speech; or unexplained weakness, or numbness)

Some people may experience side effects other than those listed. Check with your doctor if you notice any symptom that worries you while you are taking this medication.

Are there any other precautions or warnings for this medication?

Before you begin using a medication, be sure to inform your doctor of any medication conditions or allergies you may have, any medications you are taking, whether you are pregnant or breast-feeding, and any other significant facts about your health. These factors may affect how you should use this medication.

Bleeding: The most serious risk associated with warfarin is bleeding in any tissue or organ. The risk of bleeding is related to how much is taken and for how long.

It is extremely important to have regular blood tests (as recommended by your doctor) to ensure that the correct level of blood thinning is occurring. These blood tests measure your INR level to determine the dose of warfarin. Your health care provider will adjust the dose of warfarin depending on the INR level to ensure you are not receiving too little medication (which may result in blood clots forming) or too much medication (which may result in bleeding).

Congestive heart failure: People with congestive heart failure may be more sensitive to the effects of warfarin. If you have any heart problems, discuss with your doctor how this medication may affect your medical condition, how your medical condition may affect the dosing and effectiveness of this medication, and whether any special monitoring is needed.

Dental or surgical treatment: It may be necessary to stop taking warfarin briefly before scheduled dental or surgical procedures. Make sure that everyone involved in your health care is aware that you are taking this medication.

Liver function: Liver disease or reduced liver function may cause this medication to build up in the body, causing side effects, including severe bleeding. If you have liver problems, discuss with your doctor how this medication may affect your medical condition, how your medical condition may affect the dosing and effectiveness of this medication, and whether any special monitoring is needed.

Medical conditions and other medications: If you have other medical conditions and are taking medications, discuss with your doctor how this medication may affect your medical condition, how your medical condition may affect the dosing and effectiveness of this medication, and whether any special monitoring is needed.

Some conditions and medications affect the way warfarin works and may affect the dosing of warfarin. Your doctor will recommend you get regular lab tests done.

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications (NSAIDs): It is recommended that anyone taking NSAIDs such as acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) or ibuprofen should be closely monitored to ensure that no change in anticoagulation dosage is required. NSAIDs can cause stomach ulcers or bleeding. If you notice any signs of bleeding, such as frequent nosebleeds, unexplained bruising, or black and tarry stools, notify your doctor as soon as possible.

Purple toes syndrome: Purple toes syndrome is a complication of warfarin treatment and consists of a dark, purplish or mottled colour of the toes, usually occurring 3 to 10 weeks (or later) after starting treatment with warfarin. Major features of this syndrome include:

  • increasing and decreasing of the colour over time
  • pain and tenderness of the toes
  • purple colour of bottom surfaces and sides of the toes that turns white under moderate pressure and fades with elevation of the legs

Inform your doctor at once if you notice these symptoms.

Pregnancy: Warfarin should not be used during pregnancy. It may pass to the developing fetus and cause birth defects or death as a result of bleeding. If you become pregnant while taking this medication, contact your doctor immediately.

Breast-feeding: It is not known if warfarin passes into breast milk. If you are a breast-feeding mother and are taking this medication, it may affect your baby. Talk to your doctor about whether you should continue breast-feeding.

Children: The safety and effectiveness of this medication have not been established for children less than 18 years of age. However, the use of warfarin by children is necessary in certain situations.

What other drugs could interact with this medication?

There may be an interaction between warfarin and any of the following:

  • acetaminophen
  • acetylsalicylic acid (ASA)
  • adalimumab
  • alcohol
  • allopurinol
  • alteplase
  • aminosalicylic acid
  • amiodarone
  • anagrelide
  • androgens (e.g., danazol, oxandrolone, testosterone)
  • anticancer medications (e.g., carboplatin, cyclophosphamide, fluorouracil)
  • apixaban
  • aprepitant
  • atovaquone
  • azathioprine
  • "azole" antifungals (e.g., fluconazole, ketoconazole, voriconazole)
  • barbiturates (e.g., pentobarbital, phenobarbital)
  • bezafibrate
  • bicalutamide
  • birth control pills
  • bosentan
  • carbamazepine
  • cephalosporins (e.g., cefaclor, cefazolin, cefotetan, cefoxitin, cephalexin)
  • celecoxib
  • chloral hydrate
  • cholestyramine
  • cimetidine
  • clopidogrel
  • cobicistat
  • coenzyme Q10
  • colestipol
  • corticosteroids (e.g., dexamethasone, hydrocortisone, prednisone)
  • cranberry
  • dabigatran
  • dasatinib
  • deferasirox
  • dexmethylphenidate
  • dipyridamole
  • disulfiram
  • dong quai
  • dronedarone
  • entacapone
  • enzalutamide
  • erlotinib
  • estrogens (e.g., conjugated estrogen, estradiol, ethinyl estradiol)
  • ethacrynic acid
  • exenatide
  • ezetimibe
  • fenofibrate
  • garlic
  • gemfibrozil
  • ginger
  • ginkgo biloba
  • ginseng
  • glucagon
  • glucosamine
  • green tea
  • heparin
  • hepatitis C antivirals (e.g., daclatasvir, dasabuvir, ledipasvir, letermovir, ombitasvir, simeprevir, sofosbuvir)
  • HIV non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs; e.g., delavirdine, efavirenz, etravirine, nevirapine)
  • HIV protease inhibitors (e.g., atazanavir, indinavir, ritonavir, saquinavir)
  • imatinib
  • ivacaftor
  • leflunomide
  • linezolid
  • lomitapide
  • macrolide antibiotics (e.g., clarithromycin, erythromycin)
  • mefloquine
  • methimazole
  • methyl salicylate
  • methylphenidate
  • metronidazole
  • mifepristone
  • milk thistle
  • mirtazapine
  • multivitamins with vitamin A, E
  • nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs; e.g., diclofenac, ibuprofen, naproxen)
  • obinutuzumab
  • omega-3 fatty acids
  • orlistat
  • penicillins (e.g., ampicillin, penicillin G, piperacillin, ticarcillin)
  • pentoxifylline
  • phenytoin
  • phytonadione (Vitamin K)
  • prasugrel
  • primidone
  • progestins (e.g., dienogest, levonorgestrel, medroxyprogesterone, norethindrone)
  • proguanil
  • propafenone
  • propylthiouracil
  • proton pump inhibitors (PPIs; e.g., esomeprazole, lansoprazole, omeprazole)
  • quetiapine
  • quinidine
  • quinine
  • quinolone antibiotics (e.g., ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin, ofloxacin)
  • ranitidine
  • rifabutin
  • rifampin
  • ribavirin
  • rivaroxaban
  • romidepsin
  • ropinirole
  • St. John's wort
  • saw palmetto
  • selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs; e.g., citalopram, fluoxetine, paroxetine, sertraline)
  • serotonin/norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs; e.g., desvenlafaxine, duloxetine, venlafaxine)
  • sorafenib
  • "statins" (e.g., fluvastatin, lovastatin, simvastatin)
  • streptokinase
  • sucralfate
  • sulfasalazine
  • sulfonamide antibiotics (e.g., sulfadiazine, sulfamethoxazole)
  • sulfonylurea diabetes medications (e.g., chlorpropamide, gliclazide, glyburide, tolbutamide)
  • tamoxifen
  • tetracyclines (e.g., doxycycline, minocycline, tetracycline)
  • thyroid hormones (e.g., levothyroxine, liothyronine, thyroid)
  • ticagrelor
  • ticlopidine
  • tolterodine
  • tramadol
  • trazodone
  • tricyclic antidepressants (e.g., amitriptyline, clomipramine, desipramine, trimipramine)
  • urokinase
  • vitamin A
  • vitamin C
  • vitamin E
  • zafirlukast

If you are taking any of these medications, speak with your doctor or pharmacist. Depending on your specific circumstances, your doctor may want you to:

  • stop taking one of the medications,
  • change one of the medications to another,
  • change how you are taking one or both of the medications, or
  • leave everything as is.

An interaction between two medications does not always mean that you must stop taking one of them. Speak to your doctor about how any drug interactions are being managed or should be managed.

Medications other than those listed above may interact with this medication. Tell your doctor or prescriber about all prescription, over-the-counter (non-prescription) and herbal medications that you are taking. Also tell them about any supplements you take. Since caffeine, alcohol, the nicotine from cigarettes, or illegal drugs can affect the action of many medications, you should let your prescriber know if you use them.

All material copyright MediResource Inc. 1996 – 2021. Terms and conditions of use. The contents herein are for informational purposes only. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Source: www.medbroadcast.com/drug/getdrug/Taro-Warfarin

Sours: https://www.medbroadcast.com/drug/getdrug/taro-warfarin

Medication taro

HAWTHORNE, N.Y., Jun 23, 2003 (BUSINESS WIRE) -- Taro Pharmaceuticals U.S.A., Inc., the U.S. affiliate of Taro Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. (Nasdaq:TARO), today announced plans for the August 2003 launch of a line of OTC cough and cold products based on the Company's patented NonSpil(TM) liquid drug delivery system. The products will be marketed under the ElixSure(TM) brand name.

The Company intends to launch single-symptom ElixSure(TM) medications for pain/fever, cough, and congestion during the 2003-2004 cough/cold season. The medications will utilize the Company's unique spill-resistant delivery system, which pours like a liquid but resists spilling. The spill-resistant pediatric formulations are designed to provide parents with increased ease and accuracy of dosing.

"Giving liquid medicines to children can be frustrating for parents, doctors and children at a time when the emphasis should be on comforting a sick child," said Barrie Levitt, M.D., Chairman of the Company. "An unpleasant struggle often develops, which can result in spills, stains and inaccurate dosages of medicine. ElixSure's spill-resistant formulations may go a long way towards solving this problem. Of course, the success of the launch will depend upon consumer acceptance of this new delivery system," said Dr. Levitt.

The ElixSure(TM) pain/fever formulation with acetaminophen will be available in bubble gum, grape, and cherry flavors. The congestion medication with pseudoephedrine HCl will come in a grape bubble gum flavor, and the cough formulation with dextromethorphan HBr will be available in a cherry bubble gum flavor. Taro is developing additional products using the NonSpil(TM) delivery system.

The ElixSure(TM) product line will be launched by the Taro Consumer Healthcare Products (TCHP) division. TCHP will support the launch with advertising in print and on radio and television. Earlier this year TCHP launched Kerasal(R), a unique, exfoliating moisturizer for the feet.

Taro is a multinational, science-based pharmaceutical company dedicated to meeting the needs of its customers through the discovery, development, manufacturing and marketing of the highest quality healthcare products.

Certain statements in this release are forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. These statements include, but are not limited to, statements that are not describing historical facts, such as comments describing what the Company or its officers "intend," "plan," or similar statements; and comments concerning Taro's expectations regarding the launch, packaging, formulation and flavor of Taro's ElixSure(TM) products. Although Taro believes the expectations reflected in such forward-looking statements are based on reasonable assumptions, it can give no assurance that its expectations will be attained. Factors that could cause actual results to differ include distribution of the products, consumer acceptance of the products, industry and market conditions, regulatory actions, slower than anticipated penetration of new markets, changes in the Company's financial position, and other risks detailed from time to time in the Company's SEC reports, including its Form 20-F for 2002.

SOURCE: Taro Pharmaceuticals U.S.A

Taro Pharmaceuticals Daniel Saks, 914/345-9000 ext. 208 or Kevin Connelly, 914/345-9000 ext. 338 http://www.businesswire.com Today's News On The Net - Business Wire's full file on the Internet with Hyperlinks to your home page.
Sours: https://taro.gcs-web.com/news-releases/news-release-details/taro-launch-elixsure-otc-medications-products-utilize-taros
How To Use Steroid Cream - How To Use Steroid Ointment - How To Use Steroid Cream For Eczema (2018)

Me cum inside it, thinking that the instrument was covered. But, of course, nothing happened. Rag, shower, dressing. Sveta is no longer putting on a frivolous robe, but an outfit befitting a respectable university teacher. We will call you, she answered, smiling at me with dimples on her cheeks, when we saw off, when and where we would meet next time if the.

You will also like:

This was the place I was looking for, but did not find. Having led a neighbor into the corner of the log house, I pressed her against. The wall and began to kiss. Antonina did not resist, on the contrary, responded to my kisses, snuggling closer to me.

These actions of the girl excited me.



716 717 718 719 720