Marine propane cooktop

Marine propane cooktop DEFAULT

Propane cooktop

My wife, a great cook, is looking at induction for our new stovetop (in our house on land). Here's a link (no affiliation) about induction cooking on boats. The author has an open mind (it's an older article): https://theboatgalley.com/induction-cooktop-on-boat/

Here's a more recent overview of all types from Cruising World (2017): Upgrading your Galley

Maybe induction is the future.

In my early 20s, sailing in a Herreshoff 29, we had a propane oven and cooktop on gimbals. One vacation cruise, nobody noticed when the oven went out cooking, I think, a roast. So the skipper (otherwise, a very good and very safe sailor) re-lit the oven -- and whoomph!!! And just enough whoomph to consume the gas in the air around the stove, frighten the hell out of all of us, and singe his eyebrows and the hair on his arms. Thankfully, no gas had sunk into the bilges. But we did take everything up, all the floor boards, and aired the boat for 24 hours. It was very scary, but also a learning experience.

What I learned is that safety is not just about the location of the propane tank, in a separate, ventilated space. But also about the quality and health of all lines, fittings, and burners. I don't think we knew, as 20-somethings, that these should be as carefully checked, every season, as everything else on board. She was a new-ish boat. Perhaps that was the reason. But it's no excuse.

 

Sours: https://downeastboatforum.com/threads/propane-cooktop.25833/

Imagine the scent of bacon, eggs and freshly-brewed coffee wafting through the boat in the morning.

When it comes to cooking onboard, most boaters are content to use a good old portable grill. But what do you crave more than hot dogs, burgers and the occasional BBQ chicken?

If you liveaboard or plan to be on your boat for an extended time, you’ll probably want to save a little money and calories by preparing some of your own meals. Dining out while traveling, especially by boat, is wonderful. But sometimes it’s nice just to stay put.

If your boat’s big enough for a galley (kitchen in boat talk), then you’ll wanna brush up on marine stove knowledge. Regardless of how big the galley is, you can find a marine stove to fit your needs for sautéing, baking or just boiling a pot of water.

On the market is a wide range (pun intended) of marine stoves available. Depending on your boat galley’s available space, you can find stoves with just a cooktop or with an oven. Whether you’re replacing a current stove or searching for one to add to your home on the water, scroll on down to discover safe and efficient marine stoves for your trawler, cabin cruiser, sailboat or canal boat.

What Makes a Marine Stove Different From a Regular Stove?

While marine stoves bake and fry the same way as regular stoves, they do have some features that make them unique:

  • Compact in size – One noticeable difference in marine stoves are their size. Boat galleys are not as spacious as the kitchen in your house, so the stove (as well as other appliances) needs to fit into tighter spaces.
  • Gimbaled – Since boats are nearly always moving, a marine stove must pivot to stay level. This is called gimbaled. The stove has two pivot points that allow it to swing, which keeps pots or pans from sliding off onto the floor. Typically, sailboats have gimbaled stoves. Powerboats usually do not have gimbaled stoves, as they tend to stay steadier than sailboats.
  • Pot restraints – Metal brackets or clamps go around the pot to hold it in place.
  • Securely latched doors – Doors are kept shut by secure restraints so they don’t just fall open on their own.
  • Stainless steel – Marine stoves are usually made from non-corrosive materials such as stainless steel, making them less susceptible to rust.

Considerations for Cooking on Board a Boat

marine stoves

Cooking on board, like other actions on a boat, require new approaches to everyday kitchen practices. First and foremost, keep those knives in a drawer.

  • Eliminate glass – This one doesn’t need an explanation. And don’t worry, you don’t need to stick with Solo cups and paper plates. A variety of brands make quality acrylic and non-shattering dishes and drinkware. Tervis (check prices on Amazon) is one of my favorites.
  • Purchase non-slip products – Non-slip is your new best friend. This goes for cutting boards, knives, dishes and anything imaginable.
  • Allow ventilation – Your boat galley’s confined space is going to produce extra heat. Open a window or leave the hatch open for a nice breeze.
  • Condense food and storage – Your boat galley’s limited space also means you’ll need to put on your creative thinking cap when it comes to food and accessory storage.

Types of Marine Stove Fuels

I was surprised to discover just how many marine stoves are available. The main differing factor being the type of fuel they use. Combustible fuel, as well as electricity, are two energy sources that provide power for marine stoves.

Alcohol

Alcohol marine stoves, which heat by way of pressurized tanks or non-pressurized burners, come in a wide variety. Alcohol marine stoves are a safe choice; if there’s a fire, it can be extinguished with water.

On the downside, alcohol lacks in providing a high level of heat, which puts it on the less efficient side. It’s also expensive and gives off an unpleasant odor.

Diesel

Diesel marine stoves are mainly used in commercial boats. Diesel burns very hot and is cheaper than alcohol.

However, on the negative side, it can leave soot when burning and puts off a terrible odor.

Electric

Without an open flame, electric stoves are the safest choice out there.

Unfortunately, they’re also the most expensive because they require a large amount of electricity from generators or marina shore power. But if your boat has an AC genset, you’re good to go with an electric marine stove.

Propane

Propane, also known as Liquid Petroleum Gas, has become the fuel of choice for many marine stoves. It has a high heat factor, lights quickly and has no offensive odor. The major safety factor with propane is that it can ignite and cause an explosion. However, safety features like a  propane fume detector (check price on Amazon) should be put in place to alleviate this worry.

The Best Marine Stoves

Preview

Whale Seaward Princeess 2 Burner Frameless Cooktop - 240V - Pe. [2247-AC-5200]
Dickinson Marine Two Burner Propane Drop in Cooktop
Avanti GR2013CSS Gas Range, 20", Black,Stainless Steel

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Whale Seaward Princeess 2 Burner Frameless Cooktop - 240V - Pe. [2247-AC-5200]

Dickinson Marine Two Burner Propane Drop in Cooktop

Avanti GR2013CSS Gas Range, 20", Black,Stainless Steel

Preview

Whale Seaward Princeess 2 Burner Frameless Cooktop - 240V - Pe. [2247-AC-5200]

Item

Whale Seaward Princeess 2 Burner Frameless Cooktop - 240V - Pe. [2247-AC-5200]

Preview

Dickinson Marine Two Burner Propane Drop in Cooktop

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Dickinson Marine Two Burner Propane Drop in Cooktop

Preview

Avanti GR2013CSS Gas Range, 20", Black,Stainless Steel

Item

Avanti GR2013CSS Gas Range, 20", Black,Stainless Steel

Let’s discuss the different brands and features of marine stoves. Depending on the galleys’ size, you can keep it simple or go full-on gourmet if you so choose.

Eno Stoves

marine-stoves

Eno Stoves are available in two-burner gimbaled cooktops, three-burner built-in propane cooktops, wall mount ovens and three-burner stoves. Features include pot holders, gas shutoffs and raised flame guards surrounding the top, which is also handy for keeping pots and pans where they belong.

Force 10

marine-stoves

Force 10 has made marine stoves for more than 30 years. They make gimballed, built-in and cooktop marine stoves. Two, three, four and five-burner versions are available in gas or electric models. Features include stainless steel construction, ceramic glass cooktops, thermocouple protection on burners, removable top grates and slide away oven doors.

Dometic Origo

Along with cooktops and stoves, Dometic Origo (check prices on Amazon) makes a variety of marine stove accessories such as pot holders, flame spreaders and stove gimbals. Pressure-free gourmet stoves feature spacious ovens, adjustable oven racks, roasting pans, gimbals and two burners. You can enjoy that Thanksgiving turkey or Christmas ham on the water. Two and one-burner stovetops are also available.

Seaward by Whale Marine

If you’re searching for a cooktop, Seaward offers great choices. They make three-burner and two-burner cooktops (check price on Amazon) with marine-grade steel housings and aluminum top burners. Thermocouple valves shut off if the burners are extinguished. The cooktop heats quickly and the smooth glass wipes clean.

Dickinson Marine Two-Burner Cooktop

This Dickinson Marine two-burner drop-in propane cooktop (check price on Amazon) offers a is quite an efficient stove with a powerful “Triple style” 11,000 and a 7,000 BTU burner. The cooktop is also a breeze to install and includes under-counter brackets.

Avanti GR2013CSS Gas Range

For a boat with not much galley space, this Avanti 20-inch wide freestanding gas range marine stove (check price on Amazon) is the perfect option. It might not be ideal for monohull sailboats that tend to sway, as it lacks gimbals (although you could install your own), but it could work for a trawler or more stable catamaran. It also offers automatic electronic ignition and a glass oven door with a light to check on meals.

What to Cook With Your Marine Stove

marine stoves

Preview

The Boat Galley Cookbook: 800 Everyday Recipes and Essential Tips for Cooking Aboard: 800 Everyday Recipes and Essential Tips for Cooking Aboard
Boat Food: The Cookbook for Boaters
The One-Pan Galley Gourmet : Simple Cooking on Boats
Margaritaville: The Cookbook: Relaxed Recipes For a Taste of Paradise

Item

The Boat Galley Cookbook: 800 Everyday Recipes and Essential Tips for Cooking Aboard: 800 Everyday Recipes and Essential Tips for Cooking Aboard

Boat Food: The Cookbook for Boaters

The One-Pan Galley Gourmet : Simple Cooking on Boats

Margaritaville: The Cookbook: Relaxed Recipes For a Taste of Paradise

Preview

The Boat Galley Cookbook: 800 Everyday Recipes and Essential Tips for Cooking Aboard: 800 Everyday Recipes and Essential Tips for Cooking Aboard

Item

The Boat Galley Cookbook: 800 Everyday Recipes and Essential Tips for Cooking Aboard: 800 Everyday Recipes and Essential Tips for Cooking Aboard

Preview

Boat Food: The Cookbook for Boaters

Item

Boat Food: The Cookbook for Boaters

Preview

The One-Pan Galley Gourmet : Simple Cooking on Boats

Item

The One-Pan Galley Gourmet : Simple Cooking on Boats

Preview

Margaritaville: The Cookbook: Relaxed Recipes For a Taste of Paradise

Item

Margaritaville: The Cookbook: Relaxed Recipes For a Taste of Paradise

They say every meal tastes better on a boat. And with all this talk of stoves, ovens and cooktops—I’m getting hungry.

Put that new marine stove to good use and collect a few cookbooks (all available on Amazon):

Hopefully, this post sheds some light on any marine stove questions or concerns you might have.

Happy baking, broiling or frying!


Sandy Allen is a freelance writer based in Richmond, Virginia. Her specialties range from hotels, islands and yacht charters to theme parks and family fun. She enjoys boating, snorkeling and jet-skiing along the waterways of Virginia, Florida and North Carolina’s Outer Banks. Follow her adventures at Somewhere in the Sand.

Sours: https://betterboat.com/boating/marine-stoves/
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Cooking meals safely on your boat.

Cooking on a boat is very different than cooking on land. You must know how to maneuver around the galley while the boat is moving. Even anchored in calm waters, unsuspecting waves can cause the boat to move erratically causing items to fall or spill. If you own a sailboat, installing a setup that is gimbaled means the stove and oven will rock counter to the boat's movement, helping to prevent hot pans from sliding and liquids from spilling as the boat heels.

Marine stoves use one of several combustible fuels or electricity to produce heat for cooking onboard. They require certain specifications in order to prevent fires and explosions from happening. To minimize the risk of this happening, cooking appliances must be firmly secured. It's a good idea for gimbaled cooking appliances to be secure at all angles of heel. Also, boat oven doors have a secure latch so they cannot be forced open if the boat does heel.

For detailed information about the different types of marine stoves and ovens and how to best select one for your boat, see our West Advisor article Stove Selection Advice.

Sours: https://www.westmarine.com/
Propane Tank \u0026 Cooktop Install - Camp EZ Teardrop

Lighting a Propane Stove

New to using a propane stove? If you’re not familiar with them — and particularly their safety devices — you can think that the stove doesn’t work when in fact it does.

Thermocouple

Cooking on a boat is different, with a much smaller workspace and often no convenient stores. Make the transition easier with my FREE online course, Cooking for Adventures.

Propane stoves have a device called a thermocouple that shuts off the propane flow to a burner if it isn’t lit. This is very important so that if a burner blows out or if you accidentally bump a knob and turn the burner on (without lighting it), propane doesn’t flow or leak and create a fire or explosion risk.

Think of it as a tiny valve that opens when hot and closes otherwise (it will fail closed). It’s right beside a burner and the burner will heat it so it opens . . . and the burner thus stays lit. (NOTE: This is the non-technical description of how it works . . . it’s actually a relay to a valve.)

How to light a boat or RV propane stove and how the safety mechanisms work. If you're having problems getting yours to light, read this!

Okay, that’s great when the stove is lit. But how do you get it to open in the first place when you’re lighting the stove?

Push the burner knob in, light the burner, and keep holding the knob in for 5 to 10 seconds.

Pushing the knob in will open the valve, and you have to hold it in long enough for the burner to heat up the thermocouple so it will stay open. If you release the knob and the burner goes out, you need to hold it in longer on your next try.

Solenoid

The other safety feature to be aware of is the solenoid. It is — most often — a switch or push-button near the stove and there is usually a light to show when it’s on. It’s a 12-volt switch that goes to a valve very near the propane tank. The solenoid is normally closed (and it fails closed for safety) and is pulled open by an electromagnet when you turn the power to it on.

Almost all boats are equipped with a solenoid and you must turn it on before you’ll be able to light the stove. (Also make sure that the tank itself is open — it’s the screw handle on top of the tank. Turn all the way counter-clockwise to open.)

Basic Lighting Procedure

There are six steps to lighting a burner or the oven:

  1. Make sure the tank is on (and isn’t empty . . . ).
  2. Turn the solenoid on if it isn’t already.
  3. Turn the burner knob to the start position (if it’s  not marked and you don’t have an owner’s manual, turn it to high).
  4. If using a long-nose lighter, light it and hold it next to the burner.
  5. Push the burner knob in and hold. Propane will start flowing immediately (if using a built in lighter on the stove, start pressing it as soon as you press the knob). The burner should light immediately.
  6. Count to 10 and then release the knob. Make sure the burner stays lit and then you can turn it to the desired setting.

A Note on Lighters

Many propane stoves, especially newer ones, come with push-button lighters. Some work well; others don’t. Many require batteries, which can go dead. In short, don’t be surprised if the built-in lighter on the stove doesn’t work — on our boats plus all the trips I’ve done on charter boats and friends’ boats, only one has really been reliable.

Using a built-in lighter. You may have to press the button two or three times in quick succession. If it doesn’t work, release the stove knob and try again using a butane lighter. You don’t want to let propane flow very long without it lighting — it’s invisible but will puddle and be a fire/explosion hazard.

Learn more about cooking off-grid with The Boat Galley’s FREE course:

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Filed Under: Food & CookingTagged With: Chartering, Cook Adv, Cooking on a Boat, Stay Safe in the Galley

Sours: https://theboatgalley.com/lighting-a-propane-stove/

Propane cooktop marine

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