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Introduction to Cisco Nexus Switches – Nexus Product Family. Differences Between Nexus NX-OS & Catalyst IOS. Comparing High-End Nexus & Catalyst Switches

Introduction to Cisco Nexus Data Center SwitchesThis article introduces the Cisco Nexus product family (Nexus 9000, Nexus 7000, Nexus 5000, Nexus 3000, Nexus 2000, Nexus 1000V and MDS 9000). We explain the differences between Nexus and Catalyst switches but also compare commands, naming conventions, hardware capabilities etc. between Nexus NX-OS and Catalyst IOS operating systems. To provide a comprehensive overview we explain where each Nexus model is best positioned in the Data Center and directly compare high-end Nexus switches (Nexus 9000/7000) with high-end Catalyst switches (Catalyst 6800 / 6500) examining specifications, bandwidth – capacity, modules and features (High-Availability, Port Scalability, VDC, vPC – VSS, OTV, VXLAN, etc).

For our readers convenience we have made available for free download over 90 different datasheets in our Cisco Data Center download section.

Following are the topics covered in this article:

Additional Reading:

  • Cisco Nexus 7000 Module Shutdown and Removal Procedure
  • Complete Guide to Nexus Checkpoint & Rollback Feature. Fast Recovery from Nexus Misconfiguration. Nexus 9000, 7000, 5000, 3000
  • NEXUS NX-OS: Useful Commands, CLI Scripting, Hints & Tips, Python Scripting and more
  • The Complete Cisco Nexus vPC Guide. Features & Advantages, Design Guidelines, Configuration, Failure Scenarios, Troubleshooting, VSS vs vPC

Cisco Nexus Product Family

The Cisco Nexus Family of products has become extremely popular in small and large data centers thanks to their capability for unifying storage, data and networking services. Thanks to the Cisco Fabric Interconnect they are able not only to support all these services but also provide a rock-solid programmable platform that fully supports any virtualized environment.  The Cisco Nexus family includes a generous number of different Nexus models to meet the demands of any Data Center environment. Let’s take a look at what the Nexus Family has to offer!

The Nexus Product Family

The Nexus Product Family

Cisco Nexus 9000 Series Switches

These data center switches can operate in Cisco NX-OS Software or Application Centric Infrastructure (ACI) modes. The main features of the new Cisco Nexus 9000 Series are: support of Fabric Extender Technology (FEX), virtual Port Channel (vPC), and Virtual Extensible LAN (VXLAN). There are a few key differences between the Cisco Nexus 7000 Series and Nexus 9000 DC switches. The Nexus 9000 supports Application Centric Infrastructure (ACI) in contrast to the Nexus 7000 switches.  However, the Cisco Nexus 9000 switches do not support the VDCs (Virtual Device Context) technology like the Nexus 7000 and the Nexus 9000 Series doesn't support storage protocols, in contrast to the Nexus 7000. Finally, it is foreseen that the Nexus 9000 will complement the Nexus 7000 as data centers transition to ACI.

The Nexus 9000 Series Data Center Switches

The Nexus 9000 Series Data Center Switches

The Nexus 9000 switches are available in a variety of models and configurations starting from the Nexus 9200 series (1 RU) Cloud Scale - standalone, Nexus 9300 series (1RU), Nexus 9300-EX (1RU) Cloud Scale standalone/ACI, Nexus 9500-EX (1RU) Cloud Scale Modules to the Nexus 9500 Cloud Scale switches (4, 8, 16 slots).

You can compare all available modes at the following URL:

http://www.cisco.com/c/en/us/products/switches/nexus-9000-series-switches/models-comparison.html

Download complete data sheets: Nexus 9500 series, Nexus 9300-EX series, Nexus 9300 series and Nexus 9200 series

Cisco Nexus 7000 Series Switches

They can provide an end-to-end data center architecture on a single platform, including data center core, aggregation, and access layer. The N7k series provides high-density 10, 40, and 100 Gigabit Ethernetinterfaces. The main features of the Cisco Nexus 7000 Series are: support for FEX, virtual Port Channel (vPC), VDC, MPLS and Fabricpath. In addition, the N7K supports fairly robust and established technologies for multi-DC interconnect (DCI) such as OTV and LISP.  The N9K does not support these well-established DCI technologies, but a newer DCI technology, VXLAN, BGP, EVPN, that can be deployed for site-to-site DCI.

The Nexus 7000 Series Data Center Switches

The Nexus 7000 Series Data Center Switches

The Nexus 7000 series consists of the 7000 and 7700 series switches, the latter being an updated series to the original 7000 series. The Nexus 7700 series offers higher bandwidth per slot (1.3Tbps compared to 550Gbps), greater performance and ability to support up to an impressive 192 100GE ports (7700 – 18 slot) compared to 96 100GE ports (7000 – 18 slot).

The Nexus 7000 is offered in 4, 9, 10 and 18 slot models while the 7700 comes in 2, 6, 10 and 18 slot models.

You can compare all available models at the following URL:

http://www.cisco.com/c/en/us/products/switches/nexus-7000-series-switches/models-comparison.html

Download complete data sheets: Nexus 7700 series or Nexus 7000 series

Cisco Nexus 5000 Series Switches

This product line is ideal for the DC access layer (End of Row), providing architectural support for virtualization and Unified Fabric environments. Cisco Nexus 5000 Series (N5k) can support VXLAN and comprehensive Layer 2 and 3 features for scaling data center networking. It supports Native Fibre Channel, Ethernet, and FCoE interfaces. The default system software includes most Cisco Nexus 5000 Platform features, such as Layer 2 security and management features. Licensed features include: Layer 3 routing, IP multicast, and enhanced Layer 2 (Cisco Fabric Path).

The Nexus 5000 Series Data Center Switches

The Nexus 5000 Series Data Center Switches

The Nexus 5000 series switches are available in two platforms: 10 Gbps and 40 Gbps. The 5600 Series 10 Gbps platform is capable of delivering up to 2.56 Tbps switching capacity while the 5600 Series 40 Gbps platform can squeeze up to an impressive 7.68 Tbps.

All units except the Nexus 5696Q (40 Gbps) occupy between 1 and 2 RUs space whereas the Nexus 5696Q requires a generous 4 RU of rack space.

Full comparison of all available models can be found here: www.cisco.com/c/en/us/products/switches/nexus-5000-series-switches/index.html

Download complete data sheets: Nexus 5500 series or Nexus 5600 series

Cisco Nexus 3000 Series Switches

The product family offers features such as latency of less than a microsecond, line-rate at Layer 2 & 3 unicastmulticast switching, and the support of 40 Gigabit Ethernet interfaces. The Cisco Nexus 3000 Series switches are positioned for use in environments with ultra-low latency requirements such as financial High-Frequency Trading (HFT), High-Performance Computing (HPC) and automotive crash-test simulation Applications.

The Nexus 3000 Series Data Center Switches

The Nexus 3000 Series Data Center Switches

The Cisco Nexus 3000 platform offers more than 15 models to satisfy all the switching needs an organization might have. The Nexus 3000 series offers switches starting with 1GE ports (Nexus 3000) and scales all the way up to 32 port 100GE ports with the Nexus 3232C model. Environments sensitive to delays will surely benefit from this series as they have been designed to practically eliminate any switching latency while at the same time offering large buffer spaces per port. Some models also have the ability to monitor their latency.

Full comparison can be found here: http://www.cisco.com/c/en/us/products/switches/nexus-3000-series-switches/models-comparison.html#~nexus3500

Download complete data sheets: Nexus 3000 series

Cisco Nexus 2000 Series Switches 

These integrate into existing data center networking infrastructures as well as the Cisco ACI setup. The Cisco Nexus 2000 Series (N2k) utilizes FEX technology to provide flexible data center deployment models and to meet the growing server demands. This series is a flexible and low cost solution to add access and server ports to a data center. The parent switch of an N2k switch can be a Nexus 5000, Nexus 7000 or Nexus 9000 series switch. With FEX technology deployed, all the configuration and management is performed on the parent switch. In particular the N2k, with FEX technology, acts as a remote line card of the parent switches.

The Nexus 2000 series switches

The Cisco Nexus 2000 platform offers over 10 models starting with a 24-port 1GE (Nexus 2224TP) all the way up to 48-port 1/10GE SFP/SFP+ (Nexus 2300).

Download complete data sheets: Nexus 2000 series

Cisco Nexus 1000v Series Switches

The Cisco Nexus 1000V Series (N1KV) is a software-based switch. It operates inside the VMware ESX hypervisor and utilizes the NX-OS Software. The Nexus 1000v architecture has two components: the Virtual Ethernet Module (VEM) and the Virtual Supervisor Module (VSM). These two components together make up the Cisco Nexus 1000V Series Switch, with the VSM providing the management plane and the VEM providing the data plane.

It should be noted that the Nexus 1000V Essential license is available at no cost and can provide various Layer 2 networking features.

Download complete data sheets: Nexus 1000v series

Cisco MDS 9000 SAN Switches

Cisco MDS 9000 Series Multilayer Switches are used to support Data Center SAN infrastructure. This series offers director-class platforms and Fabric switches. It utilizes the Cisco NX-OS software. Finally, the MDS 9000 can offer native fibre channel, storage services, and FCoE.

Download complete data sheets: MDS 9000 series

The Nexus Operating System – NX-OS Software

The Cisco NX-OS Software is a data center-class operating system that is built with modularity, resilience, and serviceability as its foundation. It is ideal for implementation within mission-critical data center environments where reliability and fault tolerance are very important. 

The NX-OS architecture can perform three different main functions of a Data Center by being able to process Layer 2, Layer 3, and storage protocols. Each service (feature) in NX-OS runs as a separate independent protected process. In particular, each non-kernel process runs in its own protected memory space, providing fault tolerance while isolating any issues that arise with that process. For instance, if a Layer 2 service such as RSTP (Rapid Spanning-Tree Protocol) fails, it will not affect any other services running at that time such as the Layer 3 EIGRP service. In addition, NX-OS is based on the Linux kernel taking advantage of the characteristics offered by the most reliable OS.

Most NX-OS features are not enabled by default to achieve optimum processing and memory utilization, so if it is needed to deploy a technology like UDLD, this feature should be enabled manually. It should be mentioned that NX-OS offers feature testing for a 120-day grace period. Using the grace period enables customers to test a feature prior to purchasing a license. 

A network engineer who is familiar with the traditional Cisco IOS command-line interface (CLI) will not face difficulties in using the NX-OS CLI for basic operations. The official Cisco Tool, Cisco IOS to NXOS Configuration Converter, can be helpful for the translation between CISCO IOS and NX-OS. This online tool is free and supports Catalyst 4900-6500 IOS configurations, which can be translated to NS-OS configuration for the Nexus 3000, Nexus 5000, Nexus 6000, Nexus 7000 and Nexus 9000 series.

Nexus NX-OS – Catalyst IOS Key Differences

There are key differences that should be understood prior to getting involved with the Cisco Nexus Operating System (NX-OS), these are highlighted below:

  • NX-OS uses a feature-based license model. Features such as Unidirectional Link Detection (UDLD) and Fibre Channel over Ethernet (FCoE) can be enabled via the feature configuration command. Configuration and verification commands for a specific feature are not available until that feature has been enabled.
  • NX-OS supports VDCs for Nexus 7000 platforms, which enables a physical device to be partitioned into logical devices. The default VDC is used when you log in for the first time.
  • By default, Secure Shell version 2 (SSHv2) is enabled and Telnet is disabled.
  • The default login administrator user is admin. It is no longer possible to login with just a password.
  • NX-OS uses a kickstart image and a system image. The kickstart image provides the Linux kernel and the system image provides the Layer 2/3 functionalities and features such as OTV, DHCP etc.
  • NX-OS supports Checkpoint & Rollback feature that allows the creation of configuration snapshots with the ability to rollback changes at any point without interrupting system functionality.
  • All Ethernet interfaces are called Ethernet. The FastEthernet, GigabitEthernet, TenGigabitEthernet interface naming conventions no longer exist.
  • The EtherChannel(IOS) naming convention has been replaced by Port-Channel (NX-OS).
  • The Write memory command is no longer available and has been replaced with the copy running-config startup-config.
  • Show commands can be executed identically from both the exec and config mode. e.g:

N7K (config)# show version

  • Show commands have parser help even in configuration mode.
  • Slash (forward-slash) notation supported for all IPv4/IPv6 masks. For instance:

N5K (config)# int e1/1  
N5K (config-if)# ip address 10.1.1.1/24
N5K (config-if)# ipv6 address ::1/120

  • Two configuration models exist for the routing protocols:

       - IGPs follow interface-centric model

       - BGP follows neighbor-centric model

In any case the NX-OS alias command syntax can be used to create an alias for a shortcut. For instance, to use the write IOS command in NX-OS to save the running configuration, the next alias can be used:

N5K (config)#cli alias name write copy running-config startup-config

This alias executing the write command will run the command copy running-config startup-config

High-End Switches: Nexus vs Catalyst

The Nexus product family is tailored mainly for Data Center environments and offers the following advantages over Catalyst Core switches:

  • Interfaces: Only the Nexus 7000 series has 100GbE line cards available. Catalyst 6500 & 6800 Core switches offer interfaces up to 40GbE.
  • Capacity: Nexus 7000 series (Nexus 7700) has a maximum system capacity ~42Tbps and the Nexus 9000 (9500 model) 60Tbps. In contrast, the maximum system capacity of the Catalyst 6800 is much lower ~6Tbps.
  • Port Scalability: The Nexus family is much more scalable than the Catalyst 6500/6800 regarding maximum port density of 1G, 10G & 40G ports.
  • High Availability (HA): Nexus products can utilize vPC technology, which is one of the most commonly used Nexus HA features and is similar to the Catalyst VSS mode. It is used to provide multi-chassis link aggregation. The key difference is that vPC does not rely on a unified control plane as the VSS setup, so both Nexus switches can operate independently.
  • The Nexus 7000 VDC feature offers the capability to partition the Nexus switch into multiple independent logical switches. There is no possible way for VDCs to communicate with each other, aside from physically connecting a physical port in one VDC to a port in another VDC. A maximum number of four VDC for a Supervisor 1 (SUP1) - or Supervisor 2 (SUP2) based system, and up to eight for a Supervisor 2 Enhanced (SUP2E) based system is supported. The VDC feature actually implements a separate control plane for each context. The VDC virtual technology feature offers the advantage of consolidating several network physical devices.
  • The Nexus 5000, 7000 9000 series family support the use of the Nexus 2000 Series Fabric Extenders to additionally expand the system and provide a large-scale virtual chassis in the data center. This unique feature of the Nexus switches can greatly simplify the management and operation of a data center network.
  • The Nexus 7000 series can support several DC interconnection technologies which are not applicable to the Catalyst 6500 6800 Core Switches. In particular, the Nexus 7000 Series supports the well-established technologies OTV, VXLAN and Fabric path.
  • The NX-OS is much more robust operating system than IOS. NX-OS is built with modularity, resilience, and service ability as its foundation.
  • The Nexus 7000 and 5000 series switches can implement Converge LAN/SAN Network setup by supporting storage protocols (FCFCoE) which are not supported by the Catalyst 6500 6800 switches.
  • The Nexus switches cannot accept service module line cards such as Firewall (FWSM) or Wireless (WISM) Service modules like the Catalyst 6500 6800 switches.
  • Finally, the Nexus switches do not support the NAT feature in contrast to the Catalyst 6500 6800

Nexus Basic Design Aspects – Where The Nexus and MDS Switches Fit In a Data Center

This section identifies the typical placement of the Cisco Nexus and MDS Families series switches in a Cisco Data Center.

Single-Tier Nexus Data Center Design

The Cisco Nexus 7000 Series can be used for both access and core layer connectivity in the single-tier data center architecture. The access layer connectivity for the servers can be provided with low cost 48-port Gigabit Ethernet linecards or with the 32-port 10 Gigabit Ethernet linecards if 10GE interfaces are required.

Single-Tier Nexus Data Center Topology

Single-Tier Nexus Data Center Topology

The single-tier data center architecture (shown above) can be expanded by connecting Cisco Nexus 2000 fabric extenders to Cisco Nexus 7000 Series switches to provide connectivity for the servers. It should be mentioned that the Nexus 2000 can be used only to provide connectivity to servers or end hosts and should not be connected with switches.  This setup would provide a Top-of-Rack (ToR) solution for the servers with a Cisco Nexus 7000 Series switch acting as the management point, and collapsing the accessaggregation, & core layers. It should be highlighted that if the budget is limited then the Nexus 9000 is the best alternative to the Nexus 7000. A pair of Nexus 5000 switches in a single-tier setup is a common low cost solution for small Data Centers.

Two-Tier Nexus Data Center Design

The two-tier data center option connects the Cisco Nexus 2000 Fabric Extenders to an upstream Cisco Nexus 5000 Series switch. The Cisco Nexus 5000 functions as an End-of-Row (EORaccess switch and is connected via multiple links to a pair of Cisco Nexus 7000 switches. This topology provides an access layer and a collapsed core and aggregation layer.

Two-Tier Nexus Data Center Topology

Two-Tier Nexus Data Center Topology

Three-Tier Nexus Data Center Design

The three-tier data center is similar to the two-tier data center architecture regarding the access layer and the placement of the Nexus 5000 and Nexus 2000 switches. However, multiple Nexus 7000 switches are used to the aggregation layer. The core layer is provided by a pair of Cisco Nexus 7000 Series switches:

Three-Tier Nexus Data Center Topology

Three-Tier Nexus Data Center Topology

The Nexus 9000 switches, due to their exceptional performance and comprehensive feature set, are versatile platforms that can be deployed in multiple scenarios such as  layered access-aggregation-core designsLeaf-and-spine architecture and Compact aggregation-layer solutions.

The Cisco MDS 9000 Series Multilayer Switches can provide the SAN connectivity at the accesslayer and the storage core layer. Connectivity between the SAN and LAN infrastructures to support FCoE would be supported through the Cisco Nexus 7000or 5000 seriesswitches and the Cisco MDS 9000 Series core layer.

Summary

This article introduced the Cisco Nexus product family. We explained how the Nexus platform differentiates from the well-known Catalyst switches and examined key-differences in the two platforms and operating systems (NX-OS – IOS).  We analyzed each Nexus series including the well-known MDS 9000 and showed how Single-Tier, Two-Tier and Three-Tier Data Center topologies make use of the Nexus platform. For more information including technical articles visit our Cisco Data Center section.

Back to Cisco Data Center Section

Sours: https://www.firewall.cx/cisco-technical-knowledgebase/cisco-data-center/1201-introduction-nexus-family-nx-os-ios-differences.html

Cisco Nexus switches

The Cisco Nexus series switches are modular and fixed port network switches designed for the data center. Cisco Systems introduced the Nexus Series of switches on January 28, 2008. The first chassis in the Nexus 7000 family is a 10-slot chassis with two supervisor engine slots and eight I/O module slots at the front, as well as five crossbar switch fabric modules at the rear. Beside the Nexus 7000 there are also other models in the Nexus range.

All switches in the Nexus range run the modular NX-OS firmware/operating system on the fabric. NX-OS has some high-availability features compared to the well-known Cisco IOS. This platform is optimized for high-density 10 Gigabit Ethernet.

The Nexus switching range[edit]

The Nexus 7000 is the high-end model in the Nexus range of datacenter switches. Other models are:[1]

Nexus 1000v[edit]

The 1000v is a virtual switch for use in virtual environments including both VMware vSphere and Microsoft Hyper-V[2] It is as such not a physical box but a software application that interacts with the hypervisor so you can virtualize the networking environment and be able to configure your system as if all virtual servers have connections to a physical switch and include the capabilities that a switch offers such as multiple VLANs per virtual interface, layer-3 options, security features etc. Per infrastructure/cluster you have one VM running the Nexus 1000v as virtual appliance, this is the VSM or Virtual Supervisor Module and then on each node you would have a 'client' or Virtual Ethernet Module (VEM) a vSwitch which replaces the standard vSwitch.

The VEM uses the vDS API, which was developed by VMware and Cisco together[3] VMware announced in May 2017, vDS API support will be removed from vSphere 6.5 Update 2 and later. Therefore Nexus 1000v can no longer be used. VMware KB https://kb.vmware.com/s/article/2149722https://www.theregister.co.uk/2017/03/31/vmware_to_end_support_for_thirdparty_virtual_switches/

Besides offering the NX-OS interface to configure, manage and monitor the virtual switch it also supports LACP link aggregation where the standard virtual switches only support static LAGs[4]

The configuration of VEMs is done via the VSM NX-OS Command-line interface.

Nexus 1010 / 1010x / 1100x[edit]

The Virtual Supervisor Module or VSM would normally run as a virtual appliance in an ESX/ESXi cluster but it is possible to run the VSM on dedicated hardware: the Nexus 1010, 1010x and 1100. For organisations where there is a very strict boundary between network management and server management, network administrators can avoid the dependency on the VSM running as virtual machine within the ESX cluster. The capabilities and limitations of a VSM running on a Nexus1010 are the same as a VSM running as virtual appliance under ESX. A Nexus 1100 can host up to 14 VSMs and it also allows additional services such as a Network Analysis Module to be run.

Nexus 2000 series[edit]

The Nexus 2000 series are fabric extenders (FEX): 'top of rack' 1U high system that can be used in combination with higher end Nexus switches like the 5000, 6000 or 7000 series: the 2000 series is not a 'stand-alone' switch but needs to be connected to a parent and should be seen as a 'module' or 'remote line card' but then installed in a 19" rack instead of in a main switch-enclosure. The interconnection between this 'remote line card' and the 5000 or 7000 parent switch uses either proprietary interfaces (CX-1 for copper or the short or long range Cisco Fabric Extender Transceiver (FET) interfaces), or standard interfaces (Cisco SFP+ SR and LR fibre interface modules or SFP+ Twinax cables). In combination with the 5000/6000/7000 mother-switch you can create a so-called Distributed Modular System.

The 2000 series consists of 4 different models. Three models offer 24 or 48 Gbit/s only or 1 Gbit/s/fastethernet copper interfaces and up to four 10 Gigabit uplink interfaces on copper or fibre. The Nexus 2232PP offers thirty-two 1/10 Gbit/s ethernet and FCoE interfaces.[5] The Nexus 2248PQ offers forty-eight 1/10 Gbit/s ethernet and FCoE interfaces.

For the HP BladeSystem C3000 and C7000 server blade chassis, the Cisco Nexus B22HP fabric extender exists. (October 2011)[6]

The Fujitsu PRIMERGY BX400 and BX900 blade server chassis uses the B22F fabric extender. (July 2012)[7]
For the Dell M1000e blade server chassis, the Cisco Nexus B22Dell fabric extender was released in January 2013, which is 2.5 years after the initially planned release. Due to a disagreement between Dell and Cisco, Cisco stopped development of the FEX for the M1000e in 2010[8]

The Nexus B22FEX offer 16 x 10 Gbase-KR internal 10 Gbit/s link to each blade-server interface and up to 8 SFP+ ports for uplink with a Nexus 5010, 5548 or 5596 switch. The maximum distance between the FEX and the mother-switch is 3 kilometer when it is only used for TCP/IP traffic and 300 meter when carrying also FCoE traffic.[9]

Nexus 3000 series[edit]

The model 3064 is currently the only Nexus switch in the 3000-series utilizing merchant silicon. The 1U rack-switch with 1, 10 and 40 Gbit/s ethernet interfaces is designed for use in colo center. Offers layer2 and layer3 capabilities at wire-speed for all 64 interfaces running in 10 Gbit/s. Layer3 routing protocols supported include static routes, RIP v2, OSPF and BGP-4. The switch-fabric can switch 2.28 Tbit/s and forward up to 950 million packets per second. The switch is capable of building a route-table with up to 16000 prefixes, 8000 host-entries and 4000 multicast routes and up to 4096 VLANs are supported. On top of that a high number of ingress or egress ACLs can be configured.

The 3064 has a single fan tray, two replaceable power-supplies on board and two separate out of band management interfaces. To connect the 3064 to the rest of the network the use of proprietary EtherChannel or Link aggregation using industry-standard LACP or IEEE 802.3ad is supported with up to 32 port-channels with each up to 16 physical interfaces.

The switch holds of 48 SFP+[10] for 1 Gbit/s or 10 Gbit/s ethernet interfaces and four QSFP+[11] each handling 4 x 10 Gbit/s interfaces allowing for 40 Gbit/s over a single fibre-pair[12]

Nexus 4000 series[edit]

The Nexus 4000 series consists of only the model 4001: a blade-switch module for IBM BladeCenter that has all 10 Gbit Fibre Channel over Ethernet or FCoE interfaces. This blade-switch had 14 server-facing downlinks running on 1 Gbit/s or 10 Gbit/s and six uplinks using 10 Gbit/s SFP+ modules. For out-of-band management three ethernet-interfaces are available: one external 10/100/1000 bit/s copper interface, one internal management interface for the AMM or Advanced Management Module and one in-band interface using the VLAN interface option. And this blade-switch also has a serial console cable for direct access to the CLI[13]
At present only switches for the IBM blade systems are available. When the Nexus 4000 series were announced in 2009 it was expected that there would be Nexus 4001 series for IBM and Dell (and not HP)[14] but in February 2010 it became clear that Cisco canceled the Nexus 4001d for the Dell M1000e[8]
For the HP blade system Cisco released a Fabric Extender, which compares with the Nexus 2000top of rack devices, but then in a blade-form factor.[6] The FEX that was developed for the Dell blade system, which was due to be released in the summer of 2010 was dropped at the same time as the Nexus 4001d in February of that year[8]

Nexus 5000 series[edit]

The Nexus 5000 series is a range of 5 models 1U or 2U rack-switches offering 20 to 96 interfaces running on 1 or 10 Gbit/s ethernet and 10 Gbit/s FCoE interfaces. They can be used with the above-mentioned Nexus 2000 series fabric extender. The 5000-series offer carrier-grade layer2 and layer3 switching as well as the mentioned FCoE capabilities[15]

The Nexus 5000 has 5 models:

Nexus 5010[edit]

  • A one rack-unit high switch with 20 fixed 10 Gbit/s supporting ethernet, FCoE and DCB interfaces and one expansion port offering one of the following modules:
8 ports with 1, 2 or 4 Gbit/s Fibre Channel
6 ports with 1, 2, 4 or 8 Gbit/s Fibre Channel
4 ports with 10 Gbit/s FCoE or DCB and 4 ports offering 1, 2 or 4 Gbit/s Fibre Channel
6 ports offering 10 Gbit/s FCoE or DCB

Nexus 5020[edit]

A two rack-unit high switch with 40 fixed 10 Gbit/s supporting ethernet, FCoE and DCB and two expansion ports each offering one of the modules

  • 8 ports with 1, 2 or 4 Gbit/s Fibre Channel
  • 6 ports with 1, 2, 4 or 8 Gbit/s Fibre Channel
  • 4 ports with 10 Gbit/s FCoE or DCB and 4 ports offering 1, 2 or 4 Gbit/s Fibre Channel
  • 6 ports offering 10 Gbit/s FCoE or DCB

Nexus 5548[edit]

The 5548 comes in two sub-models: the 5548P and 5548UP

  • Nexus 5548P switch: 1U chassis with 32 fixed non-unified ports and up to 16 additional ports using the expansion slot. The 5548 chassis can be the main fabric for the Nexus 2000 series fabric extenders. The interfaces in the expansion slots are:
  • 16 port unified offering 1-10 Gbit/s SFP+ slot for ethernet and FCoE OR 1,2,4 or 8 native fibre channel
  • 16 port SFP+ 10 Gbit/s ethernet and FCoE
  • 8 ports SFP+ 10 Gbit/s ethernet and FCoE plus 8 ports 1,2,4 or 8 native fibre-channel.[16]
  • Nexus 5548UP: also a 1U chassis with 32 fixed unified ports and up to 16 additional ports using the expansion slot. The difference between the 5548P and 5548UP is that the 5548Ps fixed (on-board) SFP+ slots are non-unified there where the same SFP+ slots on the UP chassis are unified.[16]

Nexus 5596[edit]

The 5596 comes in two sub-models the UP and the T:

  • Nexus 5596UP: a two-RU chassis with 48 fixed unified ports and up to 48 additional interfaces in three expansion slots. Capabilities of the 5596UP is same as the 5548UP but this switch is two RU high and supports three expansion slots[16]
  • Nexus 5596T: a two-RU chassis with 48 fixed ports (32 of 10G Base-T + 16 SFP+) and up to 48 additional interfaces in three expansion slots. 5596T supports the upcoming 10G Base-T ports on the fixed as well as expansion slots along with supporting any other generic expansion modules that are supported on 5596UP.[16]

Next to the expansion modules all three Nexus 55xx switches offer the capability to insert a 160Gbit/s layer-3 routing engine

Nexus 6000 series[edit]

The Cisco Nexus 6000 range contains two models, the 6001 model and the 6004 model.[17] They can be used as layer2 and layer3 switches and can aggregate traffic from the Fabric Extenders (FEX) for different blade-server systems. Both models support either front to back or back to front airflow and they do support Fibre Channel over Ethernet in combination with a 'full' FCoE switch (e.g. Nexus 5500 or Brocade 8000 switch (which is same as Dell PowerConnect 8000e or blade version PCM 8428-k)).

Nexus 6001[edit]

The Nexus 6001 is a fixed 1 RU switch with 48 x 10 Gbit/s and 4 x 40 Gbit/s interfaces for uplinks. It can operate as both layer2 and as layer3 switch and in combination with FEX (fabric extenders) you can aggregate up to 1152 ports at 1 Gbit/s or 10 Gbit/s. System speed is wire-speed at layer2 and 1.28 Tbit/s for layer3 operation.

Nexus 6004 & 5696Q[edit]

The 2nd model in the Nexus 6000 series is a modular chassis, 4 Rack units high. The basic chassis offers 48 fixed QSFP+ ports at 40 Gbit/s each, each can be split in 4 x 10Gbit/s SFP+ ports. Besides the 48 QSFP+ ports the chassis can hold up to 4 expansion modules - each offering 12 additional 40Gbit/s QSFP+ ports - thus in total up to 96 QSFP+ ports or 384 SFP+/10Gbit/s ports and when aggregating FEX up to 1536 (blade)server ports at 1 or 10Gbit/s. As with the 6001 layer 2/layer 3 operation is at line-rate and total switching capacity of a chassis is 7,68Tbit/s. The Nexus 6004-EF switch is a modular device which provides the same features as the 6004 but with the use of expansion modules in all slots of the switch. The base configuration of the 6004-EF must have 2 x 12 port 40GbE expansion modules, delivering 24 ports of 40GbE or 96 ports of 10GbE. Additional capacity can be provided by installing further expansion modules.

For layer3 and FCoE operation additional licences are required[18]

Cisco released the Nexus 6004X switch and renamed it to the Nexus 5696Q. Previously, the Nexus 6000 series was meant to be focused on the Cisco 40G aggregation products, and the 5500 and 5600 series on 10G. However, these switches mostly shared common hardware components, ASICs, and the same software images, so recently the Cisco decided to merge the product portfolios.

Nexus 7000 series[edit]

Although the Nexus 5000 had some modular capabilities and you can attach the Nexus 2000 fabric extender to the 5500 range, the Nexus 7000 is the real modular switch in the Nexus family with six versions: one 4 slot, one 9 slot, two 10 slot and two 18 slot switches.[19] Unlike the other Nexus models, the 7000 series switches are the modular switches for campus core and data center access, aggregation and core. Some details on the models are detailed below. As with the Nexus 5000 series the Nexus 2000 Fabric Extenders can act as a remote line card on the 7000 series. 70xx and 77xx linecards and supervisor modules are not compatible.

Nexus 7004[edit]

  • 4 slots: 3-4 are line card slots, 1-2 are supervisor slots
  • 7 RU height
  • Supports 96 1 or 10 Gbit/s ports (48 per slot), 12 40 Gbit/s ports (6 per slot) or 4 100 Gbit/s ports (2 per slot), all non-blocking ports
  • 1.92 Tbit/s system bandwidth
  • 440 Gbit/s, 720 million pps (720 Mpps) per slot
  • Air flow is side to rear (input on right)
  • The chassis does not have fabric modules, the I/O modules connect directly through the backplane
  • Up to 4 power supplies.

Nexus 7009[edit]

  • 9 slots: 3-9 are line card slots, 1-2 are supervisor slots
  • 14 RU height
  • Supports 336 1 or 10 Gbit/s ports (48 per slot), 42 40 Gbit/s ports (6 per slot) or 14 100 Gbit/sc ports (2 per slot), all non-blocking ports
  • 8.8 Tbit/s system bandwidth
  • 550 Gbit/s, 720 Mpps per slot
  • Air flow is side to side (right to left)
  • Up to 5 Crossbar Fabric Modules
  • Up to 2 power supplies

Nexus 7010[edit]

  • 10 slots: 1-4 and 7-10 are line card slots, 5-6 are supervisor slots
  • 21 RU height
  • Supports 384 1 or 10 Gbit/s ports (48 per slot), 48 40 Gbit/s ports (6 per slot) or 16 100 Gbit/s ports (2 per slot), all non-blocking ports
  • 550 Gbit/s, 720 Mpps per slot
  • Air flow is front to back
  • Up to 5 Crossbar Fabric Modules
  • Up to 3 power supplies

Nexus 7018[edit]

  • 18 slots: 1-8 and 11-18 are line card slots, 9-10 are supervisor slots
  • 25 RU height
  • Supports 768 10 Gbit/s and/or 1 Gbit/s, all non-blocking ports
  • Supports 768 1 or 10 Gbit/s ports (48 per slot), 96 40 Gbit/s ports (6 per slot) or 32 100 Gbit/s ports (2 per slot), all non-blocking ports
  • 18.7 Tbit/s system bandwidth
  • 550 Gbit/s, 720 Mpps per slot
  • Air flow is side to side (right to left)
  • Up to 5 Crossbar Fabric Modules
  • Up to 4 power supplies

Nexus 7710[edit]

  • 10 slots: 1-4 and 7-10 are line card slots, 5-6 are supervisor slots
  • 14 RU height
  • Supports up to 384 10 Gbit/s ports, 192 40 Gbit/s ports or 96 100 Gbit/s ports, all non-blocking ports
  • 42 Tbit/s system bandwidth (21 Tbit/s full duplex)
  • 1.32 Tbit/s per slot
  • Air flow is front to back
  • Up to 6 switch fabric modules
  • Up to 8 power supplies (3 kW each)
  • 6 microsecond Latency

Nexus 7718[edit]

  • 18 slots: 1-8 and 11-18 are line card slots, 9-10 are supervisor slots
  • 26 RU height
  • Supports up to 768 10 Gbit/s ports, 384 40 Gbit/s ports or 192 100 Gbit/s ports, all non-blocking ports
  • 83 Tbit/s system bandwidth (42 Tbit/s full duplex)
  • 1.32 Tbit/s per slot
  • Air flow is front to back
  • Up to 6 switch fabric modules
  • Up to 16 power supplies (3 kW each)

Nexus 9000 series[edit]

The Nexus 9000 series is a range of many models 2U to 21U rack-switches offering 60 to 2304 interfaces running on 100Mb, 1Gb, 10Gb, 25Gb, 40Gb, 100Gb, 400Gb Ethernet, 10/25/40 Gb FCoE interfaces. They can be used with the above-mentioned Nexus 2000 series fabric extender.

The Nexus 9000 has many models:

Nexus 9396PX[edit]

  • A two rack-unit high switch with 48 SFP+ 10Gbit/s supporting ethernet, FCoE and DCB interfaces and one expansion port offering the modules
12 ports with 40Gb supporting ethernet, FCoE or DCB

Nexus 93128TX[edit]

  • A three rack-unit high switch with 96 fixed 1/10Gbit/s supporting ethernet, FCoE and DCB interfaces and one expansion port offering the modules
8 ports with 40 Gbit/s supporting ethernet, FCoE or DCB

Nexus 9504[edit]

  • 4 line card slots
  • 7 RU height
  • Supports 576 10 Gbit/s and/or 1 Gbit/s, all non-blocking ports
  • 15 Tbit/s system bandwidth

Nexus 9508[edit]

  • 8 line card slots
  • 13 RU height
  • Supports 1152 10 Gbit/s and/or 1 Gbit/s, all non-blocking ports
  • 30 Tbit/s system bandwidth

Nexus 9516[edit]

  • 16 line card slots
  • 21 RU height
  • Supports 2304 10 Gbit/s and/or 1 Gbit/s, all non-blocking ports
  • 60 Tbit/s system bandwidth

End-of-Life Switches[edit]

Base Model Form Factor Variants Available ports/Modules Number of power supplies Number/Type of supervisors Expansion type Sync End-of-life (only major notices listed) Comments

Current Switches[edit]

Base Model Form Factor Variants Available ports/Modules Number of power supplies Number/Type of supervisors Expansion type Sync End-of-life (only major notices listed) Comments
Nexus 2000 Series[20]Fixed2348
2332
2248
2232
2224
2148[21]
24 8P8C/2 SFP
48 8P8C/4 SFP[22]
32 8P8C/4 SFP
48 8P8C/6 SFP
32 8P8C(1/10G)/8 SFP+[23]
48 SFP+/2 to 6 SFP+
32 SFP+/8 SFP+[24]
NoneNoneSeries only behaves as FEX. Cannot be standaloneNo EoL announcements to date
Nexus 3000 Series[25]Fixed3112
3548
3524
3264
3232
3172
3164
3132
3064
3048
3016[26]
48 SFP+/4 QSFP+
32 8P8C/4 QSFP+
48 8P8C/4 QSFP+
16 QSFP+
48 8P8C/4 SFP+[27]
32 QSFP+
64 QSFP+
48 SFP+/4 QSFP+
48 8P8C/6 QSFP+
96 SFP+/8 QSFP+[28]
24 SFP+
48 SFP+[29]
Up to 2NoneNoneAnnounced 2012 (3064PQ only)[30]
Announced 2015 (3016 only)[31]
Nexus 4000 Series[32]Module4001i[33]NoneNoneNo EoL announcements to dateBlade module for IBM servers
Nexus 5000 Series[34]Hybrid56128
5696
5672
5648
5624
5596
5548[35]
5020 (EoSale)
5010 (EoSale)[36]
48 SFP+/6 QSFP+
48 SFP+/4 QSFP+
12 QSFP+
24 QSFP+
Nothing Fixed/Expansion[37]
32 10GBase-T/16 SFP+/Expansion[38]
48 SFP+/Expansion[39]
32 SFP+/Expansion[40]
40 SFP+/Expansion[41]
Up to 2None24 SFP+/2 QSFP+
8 1/2/4 Gbit/s FC
6 1/2/4/8 Gbit/s FC
4 10 Gbit/s/4 1/2/4 Gbit/s FC
6 10 Gbit/s FCoE or DCB
Can use Nexus 2000 series as FEXAnnounced 2012 (5010 and 5020)[42]
Announced 2015 (5548P only)[43]
Announced 2018 (5548UP and 5596)[44]
Several models have air flow direction options, Various Unified port options
Nexus 7000 Series Module 7004

7009

7010

7018 7702

7706

7710

7718

96 1/10 GE

24 40 GE

12 100 GE

Up to 2 2 SFP

SFP+

QSFP+

References[edit]

  1. ^Cisco product overview Datacenter switches: Nexus, visited 28 May 2011
  2. ^http://www.cisco.com/en/US/solutions/collateral/ns340/ns517/ns224/ns955/ns963/solution_overview_c22-687087.html
  3. ^Overview of the Nexus 1000v virtual switch, visited 8 July 2012
  4. ^Cisco brochure Cisco1000v Virtual Switch, PDF, retrieved 28 May 2011
  5. ^Cisco brochure Nexus 2000, PDF, retrieved 28 May 2011
  6. ^ abIT KnowledgeExchange website: Cisco FEX finally available for the HP blade-system, 18 October 2011. Visited: 27 August 2012
  7. ^Fujitsu Press Release
  8. ^ abcTheRegister website: Cisco cuts Nexus 4001d blade switch, 16 February 2010. Visited: 10 March 2013
  9. ^Cisco datasheet: Cisco Nexus B22 Blade Fabric Extender, July 2012. Visited: 27 August 2012]
  10. ^Cisco documentation on Cisco 10 Gigabit modules, visited 28 May 2011
  11. ^Cisco documentation on Cisco 40 Gigabit modules, visited 28 May 2011
  12. ^Cisco brochure ,Nexus 3000, PDF, retrieved 28 May 2011
  13. ^Cisco brochure Nexus 4001 At a Glance, PDF, retrieved 28 May 2011
  14. ^Bladesmadesimple.com: Cisco announces Nexus 4000 for blades, 29 September 2009. Visited: 26 Augustus, 2012
  15. ^Cisco brochure ,Nexus 5000 series, PDF, retrieved 28 May 2011
  16. ^ abcdCisco website on the Nexus 5500 chassis, visited 28 May 2011
  17. ^Cisco website: Cisco Nexus 6000 series, visited: 14 April 2013
  18. ^Cisco Nexus 6004 datasheet, 2013, downloaded: 14 April 2013
  19. ^Cisco Nexus 7000 Series Switches
  20. ^Cisco Nexus 2000 Series Product Line
  21. ^Cisco Nexus 2000 model list
  22. ^Cisco Nexus 2000 model types 1 GE
  23. ^Cisco Nexus 2000 model types 10G SFP
  24. ^Cisco Nexus 2000 model types 10G-Base
  25. ^Cisco Nexus 3000 Series Product Line
  26. ^Cisco Nexus 3000 model list
  27. ^Cisco Nexus 3000 model types
  28. ^Cisco Nexus 3100 model types
  29. ^Cisco Nexus 3500 model types
  30. ^Cisco Nexus 3064 EoL announcement
  31. ^Cisco Nexus 3016 EoL announcement
  32. ^Cisco Nexus 4000 Series Product Line
  33. ^Cisco Nexus 4000 model list
  34. ^Cisco Nexus 5000 Series Product Line
  35. ^Cisco Nexus 5000 model list
  36. ^Cisco Nexus 5000 EoS list
  37. ^Cisco Nexus 5000 model comparison
  38. ^Cisco Nexus 5596
  39. ^Cisco Nexus 5548P
  40. ^Cisco 5548UP
  41. ^Cisco Nexus 5020
  42. ^Cisco Nexus 5010/5020 EoL announcement
  43. ^Cisco Nexus 5548 EoL announcement
  44. ^Cisco Nexus 5500 series EoL announcement
Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cisco_Nexus_switches
  1. Fuji xt3 silver
  2. Notepads with quotes
  3. Fusion garmin
  4. Exodus 4 meaning

Cisco Nexus 9000 Series NX-OS Unicast Routing Configuration Guide, Release 6.x

Configuring Static Routing

This chapter describes how to configure static routing on the Cisco NX-OS device.

This chapter includes the following sections:

About Static Routing

Routers forward packets using either route information from route table entries that you manually configure or the route information that is calculated using dynamic routing algorithms.

Static routes, which define explicit paths between two routers, cannot be automatically updated; you must manually reconfigure static routes when network changes occur. Static routes use less bandwidth than dynamic routes. No CPU cycles are used to calculate and analyze routing updates.

You can supplement dynamic routes with static routes where appropriate. You can redistribute static routes into dynamic routing algorithms, but you cannot redistribute routing information calculated by dynamic routing algorithms into the static routing table.

You should use static routes in environments where network traffic is predictable and where the network design is simple. You should not use static routes in large, constantly changing networks because static routes cannot react to network changes. Most networks use dynamic routes to communicate between routers but might have one or two static routes configured for special cases. Static routes are also useful for specifying a gateway of last resort (a default router to which all unroutable packets are sent).

This section includes the following topics:

Administrative Distance

An administrative distance is the metric used by routers to choose the best path when there are two or more routes to the same destination from two different routing protocols. An administrative distance guides the selection of one routing protocol (or static route) over another, when more than one protocol adds the same route to the unicast routing table. Each routing protocol is prioritized in order of most to least reliable using an administrative distance value.

Static routes have a default administrative distance of 1. A router prefers a static route to a dynamic route because the router considers a route with a low number to be the shortest. If you want a dynamic route to override a static route, you can specify an administrative distance for the static route. For example, if you have two dynamic routes with an administrative distance of 120, you would specify an administrative distance that is greater than 120 for the static route if you want the dynamic route to override the static route.

Directly Connected Static Routes

You must specify only the output interface (the interface on which all packets are sent to the destination network) in a directly connected static route. The router assumes the destination is directly attached to the output interface and the packet destination is used as the next-hop address. The next hop can be an interface, only for point-to-point interfaces. For broadcast interfaces, the next hop must be an IPv4/IPv6 address.

Fully Specified Static Routes

You must specify either the output interface (the interface on which all packets are sent to the destination network) or the next-hop address in a fully specified static route. You can use a fully specified static route when the output interface is a multi-access interface and you need to identify the next-hop address. The next-hop address must be directly attached to the specified output interface.

Floating Static Routes

A floating static route is a static route that the router uses to back up a dynamic route. You must configure a floating static route with a higher administrative distance than the dynamic route that it backs up. In this instance, the router prefers a dynamic route to a floating static route. You can use a floating static route as a replacement if the dynamic route is lost.

note.gif

Noteblank.gif By default, a router prefers a static route to a dynamic route because a static route has a smaller administrative distance than a dynamic route.


Remote Next Hops for Static Routes

You can specify the next-hop address of a neighboring router that is not directly connected to the router for static routes with remote (nondirectly attached) next-hops. If a static route has remote next hops during data forwarding, the next hops are recursively used in the unicast routing table to identify the corresponding directly attached next hops that have reachability to the remote next hops.

BFD

This feature supports bidirectional forwarding detection (BFD). BFD is a detection protocol designed to provide fast forwarding-path failure detection times. BFD provides subsecond failure detection between two adjacent devices and can be less CPU-intensive than protocol hello messages because some of the BFD load can be distributed onto the data plane on supported modules. See the Cisco Nexus 9000 Series NX-OS Interfaces Configuration Guide for more information.

Virtualization Support

Static routes support virtual routing and forwarding (VRF) instances.

Licensing Requirements for Static Routing

The following table shows the licensing requirements for this feature:

 

Product License Requirement

Cisco NX-OS

Static routing requires no license. Any feature not included in a license package is bundled with the nx-os image and is provided at no extra charge to you. For a complete explanation of the Cisco NX-OS licensing scheme, see the Cisco NX-OS Licensing Guide.

Prerequisites for Static Routing

Static routing has the following prerequisites:

  • If the next-hop address for a static route is unreachable, the static route is not added to the unicast routing table..

Default Settings

Table 12-1 lists the default settings for static routing parameters.

 

Parameters Default

Administrative distance

1

RIP feature

Disabled

Configuring Static Routing

This section includes the following topics:

note.gif

Noteblank.gif If you are familiar with the Cisco IOS CLI, be aware that the Cisco NX-OS commands for this feature might differ from the Cisco IOS commands that you would use.


Configuring a Static Route

You can configure a static route on the router.

SUMMARY STEPS

1.blank.gif configure terminal

2.blank.gif ip route { ip-prefix | ip-addr/ip-mask } {[ next-hop | nh-prefix ] | [ interface next-hop | nh-prefix ]} [ name nexthop-name] [ tag tag-value] [ pref ]

or

ipv6 route ip6-prefix { nh-prefix | link-local-nh-prefix } | { nh-prefix [ interface ] | link-local-nh-prefix [ interface ]} [ name nexthop-name] [ tag tag-value] [ pref ]

3.blank.gif (Optional) show { ip | ipv6 } static-route

4.blank.gif (Optional) copy running-config startup-config

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command Purpose

Step 1

configure terminal

 

Example:

switch# configure terminal

switch(config)#

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

ip route { ip-prefix | ip-addr / ip-mask } {[ next-hop | nh-prefix ] | [ interface next-hop | nh-prefix ]} [ name nexthop-name] [ tag tag-value] [ pref ]

 

Example :

switch(config)# ip route 192.0.2.0/8 ethernet 1/2 192.0.2.4

Configures a static route and the interface for this static route. Use ? to display a list of supported interfaces. You can specify a null interface by using null 0.

The preference value sets the administrative distance. The range is from 1 to 255. The default is 1.

ipv6 route ip6-prefix { nh-prefix | link-local-nh-prefix } | ( nexthop [ interface ] | link-local-nexthop [ interface ]} [ name nexthop-name] [ tag tag-value ] [ pref ]

 

Example :

switch(config)# ipv6 route 2001:0DB8::/48 6::6 ethernet 2/1

Configures a static route and the interface for this static route. Use ? to display a list of supported interfaces. You can specify a null interface by using null 0.

The preference value sets the administrative distance. The range is from 1 to 255. The default is 1.

Step 3

show { ip | ipv6 } static-route

 

Example:

switch(config)# show ip static-route

(Optional) Displays information about static routes.

Step 4

copy running-config startup-config

 

Example:

switch(config)# copy running-config startup-config

(Optional) Copies the running configuration to the startup configuration.

This example shows how to configure a static route for a null interface:

switch# configure terminal

switch(config)# ip route 1.1.1.1/32 null 0

switch(config)# copy running-config startup-config

 

Use the no { ip | ipv6 } route command to remove the static route.

Configuring a Static Route over a VLAN

You can configure a static route without next hop support over a VLAN.

BEFORE YOU BEGIN

Ensure that the access port is part of the VLAN.

SUMMARY STEPS

1.blank.gif configure terminal

2.blank.gif feature interface-vlan

3.blank.gif interface vlan vlan-id

4.blank.gif ip address ip-addr/length

5.blank.gif ip route ip-addr/length vlan-id

6.blank.gif (Optional) show ip route

7.blank.gif (Optional) copy running-config startup-config

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command Purpose

Step 1

configure terminal

 

Example:

switch# configure terminal

switch(config)#

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

feature interface vlan

 

Example :

switch(config)# feature interface-vlan

Enables VLAN interface mode.

Step 3

interface-vlan vlan-id

 

Example :

switch(config)# interface-vlan 10

Creates an SVI and enters interface configuration mode.

The range for the vlan-id argument is from 1 to 4094, except for the VLANs reserved for the internal switch.

Step 4

ip address ip-addr/length

 

Example :

switch(config)# ip address 192.0.2.1/8

Configures an IP address for the VLAN.

Step 5

ip route ip-addr/length vlan-id

 

Example :

switch(config)# ip route 209.165.200.224/27 vlan 10

Adds an interface static route without a next hop on the switch virtual interface (SVI).

The IP address is the address that is configured on the interface that is connected to the switch.

Step 6

show ip route

 

Example:

switch(config)# show ip route

(Optional) Displays routes from the Unicast Route Information Base (URIB).

Step 7

copy running-config startup-config

 

Example:

switch(config)# copy running-config startup-config

(Optional) Copies the running configuration to the startup configuration.

This example shows how to configure a static route without a next hop over an SVI:

switch# configure terminalswitch(config)# feature interface-vlanswicth(config)# interface vlan 10switch(config-if)# ip address 192.0.2.1/8switch(config-if)# ip route 209.165.200.224/27 vlan 10 <===209,165.200.224 is the IPaddress of the interface that is configured on the interface that is directly connected tothe switch.switch(config-if)# copy running-config startup-config

Use the no ip route command to remove the static route.

Configuring Virtualization

You can configure a static route in a VRF.

SUMMARY STEPS

1.blank.gif configure terminal

2.blank.gif vrf context vrf-name

3.blank.gif ip route { ip-prefix | ip-addr ip-mask } { next-hop | nh-prefix | interface } [ name nexthop-name] [ tag tag-value] [ pref ]

or

ipv6 route ip6-prefix { nh-prefix | link-local-nh-prefix } | { next-hop [ interface ] | link-local-next-hop [ interface ]} [ name nexthop-name] [ tag tag-value] [ pref ]

4.blank.gif (Optional) show { ip | ipv6 } static-route vrf vrf-nam e

5.blank.gif (Optional) copy running-config startup-config

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command Purpose

Step 1

configure terminal

 

Example:

switch# configure terminal

switch(config)#

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

vrf context vrf-name

 

Example:

switch(config)# vrf context StaticVrf

Creates a VRF and enters VRF configuration mode.

Step 3

ip route { ip-prefix | ip-addr ip-mask } { next-hop | nh-prefix | interface } [ name nexthop-name] [ tag tag-value ] [ pref ]

 

Example :

switch(config-vrf)# ip route 192.0.2.0/8 ethernet 1/2

Configures a static route and the interface for this static route. Use ? to display a list of supported interfaces. You can specify a null interface by using null 0.

You can optionally configure the next-hop address.

The preference value sets the administrative distance. The range is from 1 to 255. The default is 1.

ipv6 route ip6-prefix { nh-prefix | link-local-nh-prefix } | ( nexthop [ interface ] | link-local-nexthop [ interface ]} [ name nexthop-name] [ tag tag-value ] [ pref ]

 

Example :

switch(config)# ipv6 route 2001:0DB8::/48 6::6 ethernet 2/1

Configures a static route and the interface for this static route. Use ? to display a list of supported interfaces. You can specify a null interface by using null 0.

You can optionally configure the next-hop address.

The preference value sets the administrative distance. The range is from 1 to 255. The default is 1.

Step 4

show { ip | ipv6 } static-route vrf vrf-name

 

Example:

switch(config-vrf)# show ip static-route

(Optional) Displays information on static routes.

Step 5

copy running-config startup-config

 

Example:

switch(config-vrf)# copy running-config startup-config

(Optional) Copies the running configuration to the startup configuration.

This example shows how to configure a static route:

switch# configure terminal

switch(config)# vrf context StaticVrf

switch(config-vrf)# ip route 192.0.2.0/8 192.0.2.10

switch(config-vrf)# copy running-config startup-config

Verifying the Static Routing Configuration

To display the static routing configuration, perform one of the following tasks:

 

Command Purpose

show {ip | ipv6} static-route

Displays the configured static routes.

show ipv6 static-route vrf vrf-name

Displays static route information for each VRF.

show {ip | ipv6} static-route track-table

Displays information about the IPv4 or IPv6 static-route track table.

Configuration Example for Static Routing

This example shows how to configure static routing:

configure terminal

ip route 192.0.2.0/8 192.0.2.10

copy running-config startup-config

 

Sours: https://www.cisco.com/c/en/us/td/docs/switches/datacenter/nexus9000/sw/6-x/unicast/configuration/guide/l3_cli_nxos/l3_route.html
Top 10 - Frequently asked - Cisco Nexus Interview Questions \u0026 Answers - DataCenter NOC Engineer

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