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The AAV is not dead yet: The Corps wants new tracks to improve land and sea mobility

While the Corps is nearing a contract award date for the new amphibious combat vehicle, or ACV, don’t expect the assault amphibious vehicle to be sent to the scrap pile anytime soon: The Corps is looking for new tracks to prolong the life of the vehicle into 2035.

It’s part of the Corps’ assault amphibious vehicle, or AAV, survivability upgrade program to keep the over 40-year-old vehicle ticking and on Tuesday the Marines posted a request for information for new tracks that could enhance the legacy amphib vehicle’s mobility.

The RFI submitted by Marine Corps Systems Command seeks information “to assess industry’s capability to produce Improved Amphibious Tracks [IAT] that enhance land mobility and water swim capabilities for approximately 400 AAV SU [ assault amphibious vehicle survivability upgrade],” according to the RFI.

While the Corps waits on the production of the ACV, the legacy AAV’s are amidst various upgrades to plug gaps in the vehicle’s ability to protect crew and Marines in the vehicle from breaching and explosions, a lesson learned from operations in Iraq.

“The AAV SU provides enhanced protection to the crew and embarked Marines with increased underbelly armor, blast mitigating seats, external fuel cells, and redesigned external armor,” the RFI states.

The new survivability upgrades allow the AAV to operate with M1A1 tanks and other armored vehicles associated with a Marine Air-Ground Task Force in urban and or restrictive terrain.

There are three types of AAVs, personnel carrier, command and control, and recovery and the Corps is planning to upgrade 361 AAVP7A2s, 44 AAVC7A2s, and 39 AAVR7s.

While the AAV undergoes upgrades the Corps is nearing a contract award decision expected sometime in June for a low-rate initial production between BAE Systems and SAIC. The Corps plans to acquire 30 low-rate initial production vehicles during fiscal year 2019, according to Navy budget documents.

Testing of the two companies’ prototypes concluded in December and the Corps submitted a request for proposal in January.

The new eight wheeled ACV is expected to be more lethal, better mobility on land and water, and increased blast protection.

But the AAV will remain in use for the foreseeable future, as the Corps expects the ACV to serve as a partial and complimentary replacement to the AAV.

The Marines anticipate a contract award date for the new and improved AAV tracks for testing purposes in December 2018, according to the RFI. “The operational need dates for delivery of IAT to the Operating Forces is 100 sets per year over four years starting October 2021,” the RFI states.

About Shawn Snow

Shawn Snow is the senior reporter for Marine Corps Times and a Marine Corps veteran.

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Unit Information

The mission of the 2nd AAB is to land the surface assault element of the landing force and their equipment in a single lift from assault shipping during amphibious operations to inland objectives and to conduct mechanized operations and related combat support in subsequent operations ashore.

BASE LOCATION:
MCB Camp Lejeune, NC

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Family Readiness Information

The primary source of unit/battalion information for spouses AND parents is the Deployment Readiness Coordinator (DRC) and Unit Hotline. The DRC will work with FR Assistants, FR Advisors and FR Volunteers along with the senior command members to make up the new Family Readiness Command Team.

Note: The DRC was formerly known as FRO and in some instances, the USMC Family Readiness Page has not been updated to reflect DRC rather than FRO.

FAMILY READINESS PAGE:
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DEPLOYLMENT READINESS COORDINATOR (DRC):
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DRC PHONE NUMBER:
910-440-7310

Unit Hotline Number:

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2nd Assault Amphibian Battalion (2nd AAB) Mailing Addresses

2d Assault Amphibian Battalion PSC Box 20070 Camp LeJeune, NC 28542-0070
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2nd Assault Amphibian Battalion is a mechanized battalion of the United States Marine Corps. Their primary weapon system is the Amphibious Assault Vehicle and they are part of the 2nd Marine Division and the II Marine Expeditionary Force. The unit is based out of the Camp Lejeune, North Carolina

Mission[]

Land the surface assault element of the landing force and their equipment in a single lift from assault shipping during amphibious operations to inland objectives; to conduct mechanized operations and related combat support in subsequent operations ashore.

Current units[]

History[]

World War II[]

The Battalion organization was activated on March 18, 1942 at Marine Barracks San Diego, California. The "Second Amphibian Tractor Battalion" was an Organic unit of the 2nd Marine Division, composed of a Headquarters and Service Company and three letter companies, all equipped with the Landing Vehicle Tracked-1 (LVT-1).

In 1942, the Battalion set sail from San Diego, CA with the 1st Marine Division to meet the Japanese tide sweeping across the South Pacific. Elements of the 2nd Amphibian Tractor Battalion participated in assaults on Guadalcanal, Tarawa, Saipan, Tinian and Okinawa. After the surrender of Japan in August 1945, the battalion returned to the United States and deactivated on 29 November 1945. The 2nd Amphibian Tractor Battalion was reactivated on 1 May 1946. The Battalion was stationed at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina where it participated in peace time training with the 2nd Marine Division. During this time the Battalion was equipped with the LVT-3 and consisted of a Headquarters and Service company and four letter companies. As a result of the economy program, the Battalion was once again deactivated on 16 October 1949.

Vietnam War[]

In 1966, the battalion transferred 260 Amphibian Tractor Crew men to Vietnam. Throughout the war, the 2nd Amphibian Tractor Battalion supported routine deployments and provided training support to the 2nd Marine Division.

1980s and 1990s[]

Bravo Company 2nd AABN Operation Support Democracy.

Elements of deployed in support of Multinational Force Beirut Lebanon 1983-1985 as part of the 24th Marine Amphibious Unit (MAU). Elements of the battalion participated in Operation Urgent Fury in Grenada in 1983 as part of the 22nd Marine Amphibious Unit (MAU). Deployment to the Persian Gulf as part of Operation Desert Shield and Operation Desert Storm.

Deployment to Somalia in support of protecting the delivery of food in Dec. 1992, and in May 1993 the UN took control of the relief efforts from the U.S.

In August 1994, a platoon from Bravo Company 2nd AABN and Golf Company, 2nd Battalion, 2nd Marines departed for the Caribbean and Haitian waters for Operation Support Democracy. On the morning of September 20, Marines once again landed on the shores of Cap Haitian, Haiti since the first landing by Major Smedley Butler in 1915. Tensions were high and a fire fight ensued between Haitian military police and a Marine patrol. The incident ended with no Marine deaths but Ten Haitian Policeman were killed. Battalion 2/2 and its AAV attachment remained during Operation Uphold Democracy lasting until October 1994.

In April 1996, Golf Company 2/2 and Charlie Company 1st Platoon was attached to the 22nd Marine Expeditionary Unit. The AAV platoon was used as rifleman and as a reactionary force in support of Golf Company during the reinforcement of the American Embassy in Monrovia, Liberia during Operation Assured Response.

Global War on Terror[]

Operation Iraqi Freedom[]

The battalion was deployed to the Middle East in 2003 and took part in Operation Iraqi Freedom I providing mechanized support for the infantry regiments. On 23 March, elements of Company A and C fought in the Battle of Nasiriyah with Regimental Combat Team 2.

After the invasion, the battalion began a regular rotation of companies to Iraq. Usually designated "Team Gator", these companies provided both traditional AAV missions and provisional infantry missions.

Company C and D participated in the Operation Phantom Fury (Second Battle of Fallujah) in November 2004 - January 2005.

In 2007, Company D was the last 2d AABn unit to use AAVs in country. They switched, in January 2008, to MRAPs and continued security missions all along Mobile, their usual area of operations (AO), after Operation Phantom Fury.

Company B deployed to Ramadi in support of 1st Battalion, 9th Marines. The company was tasked with operating the numerous entry control points (ECPs) around the city.

Company A deployed as MRAP Company and relieved Company B and took over the ECP's in Oct 2008 in Ramadi. They then closed all ECP's down and turned them over to the Iraqi Police in Feb 2009 and returned home.

Operation Enduring Freedom[]

Elements of Company C deployed to the Helmand Province with Battalion Landing Team 1/6 as part of the 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit. The platoon was part of combat operations in the Taliban filled district of Garmsir.

Company D deployed to the Helmand Province, Afghanistan as MRAP Company, Regimental Combat Team 3 in 2009. They conducted route security missions, local population engagements, screening missions, and manned two combat outposts while attached to 1st Battalion, 5th Marines.

Company B, Det-A deployed from November 2009 to May 2010 to relieve Company D as MRAP Company for Regimental Combat Team 7. Fourth Platoon was attached to 1st Battalion, 3d Marines and conducted provisional infantry missions from two combat outposts. Third Platoon and the company headquarters element participated in Operation Moshtarak (Battle of Marjeh). After supporting clearing operations with the 3/4/205 Afghan National Army battalion, the platoon provided security at the Marjeh Government Center and for the District Governor.

Company B, Det-B deployed as part of the troop surge in Afghanistan in December 2009. They were designated as the Base Defense Operations Center company and secured the major southern Helmand Province Marine base Camp Dwyer. Second Platoon provided the guard force for the base and manned a nearby outpost. Elements of 1st Platoon also participated in route security and screening missions during the preparations phase of Operation Moshtarak.

Operation Unified Response Following the devastating earthquake Haiti in January 2010, platoons of Company A and C (as part of the 22nd and 24th Marine Expeditionary Units) as well as Yankee Platoon from Headquarters and Service Company (part of African Partnership 2010) deployed to the country to provide humanitarian assistance

Notable former members[]

See also[]

Notes[]

References[]

 This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the United States Marine Corps.
Web
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U.S. Marines with 2d Tank battalion, host a sombre ceremony to send off last Tanks in Camp Lejeune

2nd Marine Division CO Regrets How He Rolled Out Stringent New Routine. But He's Not Backing Down

In a recent editorial in Task and Purpose, an anonymous writer described as a junior Marine officer in the combat arms castigates Maj. Gen. David Furness, the commander of 2nd Marine Division, out of Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, saying his rigid new basic daily routine for Marines "violates the core tenets of Marine Corps doctrine" and should be repealed.

Furness was less than impressed.

"I haven't seen it; I probably won't look at it," he said, when asked about the open letter. "I would love for that Marine officer to have the intestinal fortitude to come and talk to me about it. I can explain myself to anyone in the division at any time."

In an interview with Military.com this month about his decision to crack down on what he sees as failures of discipline in the ranks by instituting 5:30 a.m. reveilles, mandatory daily formations, and cleaning and hygiene time across the division, Furness said he did not anticipate the rapid -- and largely critical -- response that ripped across social media pages and military internet communities.

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"We sent [the April 16 policy letter] out to commanders and sergeants major. They printed it and put it in duty huts, and somebody took a screenshot. I did not anticipate that," Furness said. "That's a failure on my part."

In retrospect, he said, he would have involved public affairs in the rollout plan earlier and gotten in front of some of the controversy.

"If I were to grade myself for product, on why I'm doing this, I think it's an A. I don't think anyone can question better combat performance," he said. "How I rolled it out, if I'm being kind to myself, I'd probably give myself a D-minus."

Since his policy letter dropped, Furness has been called a micromanager, obsessed with the minutiae of personal grooming rather than larger questions of combat effectiveness. He has been taken to task online for describing the majority of casualties during a 2010 deployment to Afghanistan as the fault of the Marine who died, and for an anecdote he shared in an All Marine Radio interview about how wearing a seatbelt could have saved the life of a Marine driver who rolled over an improvised explosive device.

Blaming those who gave all for their fate might be seen as a rhetorical third rail. But Furness is not backing down or walking back any of it.

"That particular vignette, the importance of it is to highlight the unforgiving environment, the enormous consequences of not doing the right thing in combat," he said. "Doing the right thing in combat and doing the right thing in garrison are not mutually exclusive."

The anecdote he gave about a Marine fatally colliding with his steering column after hitting an IED, he described as a tragic event that he remembered vividly.

"I used it to gain [the Marines'] attention and to shock them a little bit," he said.

Furness said he hasn't been in touch with the commanders of 1st Marine Division, on the West Coast, or 3rd Marine Division, in Japan and the Pacific, to learn if they plan to institute similar standards with their units. He did get a call from Marine Corps Commandant Gen. Robert Neller earlier this month, though.

"The commandant called me a week ago to ask me if I was doing OK," Furness said. "He was supportive. He was just checking up on one of his Marines."

Though Furness allows that not all Marines in 2nd Marine Division are thrilled about having Reveille blasted in the barracks at the crack of dawn, he maintains that most of the blowback on the policy is from an "external audience" of those outside the division. The basic daily routine policy, he said, was developed by a "council of sergeants" he assembled soon after taking command of the division.

"Marines in the division ... I think they understand, there is an issue here. We may have slipped a little bit; we need to do a better job," he said. "The sergeants remain supportive; they believe we're doing the right thing for the right reason."

Furness wouldn't point to any specific events that had triggered his decision to issue the policy letter. But he noted the problem was not just Marines' sloppy habits and appearances, but an unwillingness on the part of small-unit leaders to correct them.

As Furness sees it, what he observes at the division is a devolution 10 years in the making. The Marine leaders who trained him in the 1980s, he said, had vivid memories of the wild disarray of the post-Vietnam Marine Corps. Drug use then was rampant, racial tension was hot, and officers feared patrolling Marine barracks without a sidearm for their own protection.

The Corps implemented some zero-tolerance policies and cleaned up its act, but then came war and the frenetic operational tempo of the era following Sept. 11, 2001. Now, he said, Marines are no longer spending as much time deployed as they do at home, but some of the time and focus on professionalization has disappeared.

Some Marines don't believe personal grooming has much to do with combat effectiveness. Furness simply disagrees.

"One of the key attributes of a well-trained combat Marine or sailor is what I'll call vigilance-slash-attention to detail," he said. "That is not a skill one is born with; it's developed over much time. Grid coordinates for fire mission, or the nine-line process for an air mission -- all these requirements are very precise for how they're done and how they're executed."

Furness will kick off this new era of attention to detail in 2nd Marine Division with a stand-down event June 3-7, in which all Marines in the unit will participate. That will be followed by quarterly check-ins -- the next one is tentatively planned for September -- to dedicate time to the topics of leadership and discipline.

In his original policy letter, Furness offered Marines who couldn't get with his new program the opportunity to request a transfer out of the unit. So far, he said, nobody has taken him up on the offer. But he said he'll be paying attention to how junior leaders get in line with maintaining and enforcing the standard, particularly the officers.

"Those people that are not as courageous as we might like don't suddenly become courageous under fire," he said. "They probably need to find other employment."

-- Hope Hodge Seck can be reached at [email protected]. Follow her on Twitter at @HopeSeck.

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Usmc 2nd tracks

2nd Assault Amphibian Battalion

Military unit

2nd Assault Amphibian Battalion is a mechanized battalion of the United States Marine Corps. Their primary weapon system is the Amphibious Assault Vehicle. The battalion is a separate battalion within the 2nd Marine Division and the II Marine Expeditionary Force. The unit is based out of the Camp Lejeune, North Carolina

Mission[edit]

Land the surface assault element of the landing force and their equipment in a single lift from assault shipping during amphibious operations to inland objectives; to conduct mechanized operations and related combat support in subsequent operations ashore.

LVT-1 put out of action by enemy fire on Beach RED 1, Tarawa

Current units[edit]

Motto[edit]

YAT-YAS, "You Ain't Tracks, You Ain't Shit"

History[edit]

World War II[edit]

The Second Amphibian Tractor Battalion was commissioned on March 18, 1942, in San Diego, California. The battalion was an organic unit of the 2nd Marine Division, composed of a Headquarters and Service Company and three letter companies, all equipped with the Landing Vehicle Tracked-1 (LVT-1).

Disabled U.S. LVTs and a Japanese Type 95 light tank on Tarawa litter the beach after the battle.

Guadalcanal[edit]

In November 1942 the battalion was relocated to Wellington, New Zealand where it continued training for follow on amphibious operations. Company H from 2d Tracks arrived at Tulagi on October 9 as part of other reinforcements from the 2nd Marine Division.

Tarawa[edit]

The battalion left New Zealand along with the rest of the 2nd Marine Division on November 1, 1943. While participating in a practice landing against Mele Bay, Efate on November 8, the battalion was also preparing to receive 50 new LVT-2 amphibian tractors. The new LVT-2s were placed into Company A-1 which was stood up with additional personnel from the 1st Amphibian Tractor Battalion, 2d Light Tank Battalion and 2d Special Weapons Battalion. Tarawa marked the first time the LVT-2 Water Buffalo participated in combat operations. The battalion's LVTs took part in the first, second, and third waves of landings at Tarawa on November 20, 1943. The first wave across the beach consisted of 42 LVT-1s each carrying 18 Marines and 45 LVT-2's each with 20 Marines.

The battalion's LVTs provided a continuous supply of ammunition, reinforcements, and ferrying back of the wounded. Of 125 vehicles used (50 new LVT-2s and 75 LVT-1s), only 35 remained operational by the end of the first day, continuing to ferry men and supplies across the coral reef and through the shallows to the beach. The Battle of Tarawa resulted in 32 killed in action and 68 missing Marines for the battalion.[7] Among the dead was the battalion's commanding officer, Major Henry C. Drewes, who was posthumously awarded the Silver Star for his heroic actions under fire before being killed on the first day of the battle.[8] Following the assault on Tarawa the battalion was sent to Hawaii where it established itself at the newly created Camp Henry C. Drewes and began receiving new equipment, men and supplies and also began training for its next combat operation.[9]

Saipan & Tinian[edit]

In May 1944 the decision was made to assign the battalion to the V Amphibious Corps vice the 2nd Marine Division. This was revised in September 1944 when the battalion was again reassigned to Fleet Marine Forces, Pacific.LVT-4s from the 2nd Amphibian Tractor Battalion, again transporting Marines from the 2d Marine Division, came ashore at Saipan, south of Garapan at 0843 on June 15, 1944.

On July 24, 1944 the 2nd Amphibian Tractor Battalion with 96 LVT-2s and 40 LVT-4s, brought the 24th Marine Regiment ashore during the Battle of Tinian,[12]

Post-war movement and reorganization[edit]

After the surrender of Japan in August 1945, the battalion returned to the United States and was decommissioned on November 29, 1945 at Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California.

The 2nd Amphibian Tractor Battalion was reactivated on May 1, 1946. The Battalion was stationed at Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, where it participated in peace time training with the 2nd Marine Division. During this time the battalion was equipped with the LVT-3 and consisted of a Headquarters and Service company and four letter companies.

Vietnam War[edit]

In 1966, the battalion transferred 260 Amphibian Combat Operators to Vietnam. Throughout the war, the 2nd Amphibian Tractor Battalion supported routine deployments and provided training support to the 2nd Marine Division.

1980s and 1990s[edit]

Bravo Company 2nd AABN Operation Support Democracy.
AAV's at the port of Cape Haitian, Haiti 1994.

Elements of deployed in support of Multinational Force Beirut Lebanon 1983–1985 as part of the 24th Marine Amphibious Unit (MAU). Elements of the battalion participated in Operation Urgent Fury in Grenada in 1983 as part of the 22nd Marine Amphibious Unit (MAU). Deployment to the Persian Gulf as part of Operation Desert Shield and Operation Desert Storm.

Deployment to Somalia in support of protecting the delivery of food in Dec. 1992, and in May 1993 the UN took control of the relief efforts from the U.S.

In August 1994, a platoon from Bravo Company 2nd AABN and Golf Company, 2nd Battalion, 2nd Marines departed for the Caribbean and Haitian waters for Operation Support Democracy. On the morning of September 20, Marines once again landed on the shores of Cap Haitian, Haiti since the first landing by Major Smedley Butler in 1915. Tensions were high and a fire fight ensued between Haitian military police and a Marine patrol. The incident ended with no Marine deaths but Ten Haitian Policeman were killed. Battalion 2/2 and its AAV attachment remained during Operation Uphold Democracy lasting until October 1994.

In April 1996, Golf Company 2/2 and Charlie Company 1st Platoon was attached to the 22nd Marine Expeditionary Unit. The AAV platoon was used as rifleman and as a reactionary force in support of Golf Company during the reinforcement of the American Embassy in Monrovia, Liberia during Operation Assured Response.

Global War on Terror[edit]

Operation Iraqi Freedom[edit]

An AAV from 2nd AABn conducts an IED sweep outside of Fallujahin August 2006.

The battalion was deployed to the Middle East in 2003 and took part in Operation Iraqi Freedom I providing mechanized support for the infantry regiments. On 23 March, elements of Company A and C fought in the Battle of Nasiriyah with Regimental Combat Team 2.

After the invasion, the battalion began a regular rotation of companies to Iraq. Usually designated "Team Gator", these companies provided both traditional AAV missions and provisional infantry missions.

Company C and D participated in the Operation Phantom Fury (Second Battle of Fallujah) in November 2004 – January 2005.

In 2007, Company A was the last 2d AABn unit to use AAVs for entire deployment relieved by company D. Company D switched, in January 2008, to MRAPs and continued security missions all along Mobile, their usual area of operations (AO), after Operation Phantom Fury.

Company D was the last AAV unit tasked with the Route Mobile mission. Company B relocated to Ramadi upon arrival.

Company B deployed to Ramadi in support of 1st Battalion, 9th Marines. The company was tasked with operating the numerous entry control points (ECPs) around the city.

Company A deployed as MRAP Company and relieved Company B and took over the ECP's in Oct 2008 in Ramadi. They then closed all ECP's down and turned them over to the Iraqi Police in Feb 2009 and returned home.

Amphibious Assault Vehicles from 2nd Assault Amphibian Battalion splash off the back of an amphibious assault ship off the coast of Camp Lejeune, NC in 2009.

Operation Enduring Freedom[edit]

Elements of Company C deployed to the Helmand Province with Battalion Landing Team 1/6 as part of the 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit. The platoon was part of combat operations in the Taliban filled district of Garmsir.

Company D deployed to the Helmand Province, Afghanistan as MRAP Company, Regimental Combat Team 3 in 2009. They conducted route security missions, local population engagements, screening missions, and manned two combat outposts while attached to 1st Battalion, 5th Marines.

Company B, Det-A deployed from November 2009 to May 2010 to relieve Company D as MRAP Company for Regimental Combat Team 7. Fourth Platoon was attached to 1st Battalion, 3d Marines and conducted provisional infantry missions from two combat outposts. Third Platoon and the company headquarters element participated in Operation Moshtarak (Battle of Marjeh). After supporting clearing operations with the 3/4/205 Afghan National Army battalion, the platoon provided security at the Marjeh Government Center and for the District Governor.

Company B, Det-B deployed as part of the troop surge in Afghanistan in December 2009. They were designated as the Base Defense Operations Center company and secured the major southern Helmand Province Marine base Camp Dwyer. Second Platoon provided the guard force for the base and manned a nearby outpost. Elements of 1st Platoon also participated in route security and screening missions during the preparations phase of Operation Moshtarak.

Marines from Bravo Company, 2nd Assault Amphibian Battalion return fire on the Taliban during Operation Moshtarakin Marjeh, Afghanistan 2010.

Operation Unified Response Following the devastating earthquake Haiti in January 2010, platoons of Company A and C (as part of the 22nd and 24th Marine Expeditionary Units) as well as Yankee Platoon from Headquarters and Service Company (part of African Partnership 2010) deployed to the country to provide humanitarian assistance

Operation Odyssey Dawn and Operation Unified Protector[edit]

At the start of Operation Odyssey Dawn, the US-led operation in support of the Libyan civil war, the ground combat element of the 26th MEU was in Afghanistan conducting combat operations. In order to quickly provide sea-based ground troops to support possible ground intervention in Libya, the 22nd Marine Expeditionary Unit deployed in March 2011, four months prior to its originally scheduled deployment. Delta Company, 1st Platoon, deployed as AAV Platoon (aboard USS Whidbey Island LSD-41) as part of Echo Company, Battalion Landing Team 2nd Battalion, 2nd Marines (2/2), the Ground Combat Element for the 22nd MEU. After several months preparing for possible ground combat operations and quick reaction force for Operation Odyssey Dawn, and the subsequent NATO-led Operation Unified Protector, the 22nd MEU and the USS Bataan Amphibious Ready Group spent a total of 10 1/2 months at sea in the Mediterranean and Middle East conducting bi-lateral training and supporting national contingency planning as a result of the new Arab Spring. Its 321-day duration fell eight days short of the record set in 1973 by the aircraft carrier USS Midway for the longest U.S. Navy deployment since World War II. The 22nd MEU was awarded the Meritorious Unit Commendation and the NATO Non-Article 5 Medal for Operation Unified Protector. While at sea, AAV platoon had a secondary mission as a provisional rifle platoon, to provide an additional trained medium machine gun squad, and as the Evacuation Control Center for any potential non-combatant evacuation operations. Upon return to 2nd Assault Amphibian Battalion, the platoon was re-designated at Charlie Company, 3rd platoon.

Notable former members[edit]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

References[edit]

Public Domain This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the United States Marine Corps.
Bibliography
  • Hammel, Eric; Lane, John E. (1998). Bloody Tarawa. Zenith Press. ISBN .
  • Johnston, Richard (1948). Follow Me: The Story of the Second Marine Division in World War II. New York: Random House. ASIN B000WLAD86.
  • Rottman, Gordon L. (2002). U.S. Marine Corps World War II Order of Battle: Ground and Air Units in the Pacific War, 1939-1945. Greenwood.
  • Rottman, Gordon L. (2004). US Marine Corps Pacific Theater of Operationss 1944-45. Osprey Press. ISBN .
  • Wright, Derrick (2000). Tarawa: The Turning of the Tide. Osprey Publishing Ltd. ISBN .
Web
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Once more into the breach: 2nd Tracks supports engineers, tanks

CAMP LEJEUNE, N.C. - The sound of grinding treads and rumbling engines roll across the open field. The Marines have arrived. Once in position combat engineers file out the rear of the vehicles while heavy breaching vehicles plow through barriers in the path to their objective.

Marines with 2nd Assault Amphibian Battalion, 2nd Marine Division supported 2nd Combat Engineer Battalion and 2nd Tank Battalion during an obstacle-breaching exercise on Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, May 18-21, 2015.

“It builds camaraderie and it helps other units know what we can and can’t do,” said Cpl. Joshua Law, an assault amphibious vehicle crew chief with 2nd AA Bn. “What some units can’t do, we can do with ease. We were supporting them and it was fun, lots of fun.”

The mission of 2nd AA Bn. is to land the ground forces and their equipment during amphibious operations, and to conduct mechanized operations and related combat support missions. The battalion provided transportation for combat engineers and additional firepower for security during obstacle-clearing operations conducted by engineers and tanks.

The battalion regularly attaches companies to other units on deployments, and obstacle breaching is just one type of operation they may encounter overseas. Training exercises such as this serve to strengthen the battalion and II Marine Expeditionary Force.

A combined attack of AAVs and engineers moving on foot took a force of Marines, who portrayed enemy combatants, by surprise before they could complete their defenses. The attack served as an experience for the Marines to draw on in order to improve their abilities for future operations. Real-world scenarios like this allow Marines to apply training in various situations more effectively.

“There are obstacles that the enemy puts out at any given time, and we’ve got to overcome that and not be put into choke points where we could get ambushed and become ineffective,” said. Cpl. Charles Baker, an assault amphibious vehicle crewman and a native of Wichita, Kansas. “It shows what each section is capable of when everybody gets together, and it gives everybody more appreciation for the different sections.”

Maintaining the readiness of amphibious units, even during non-amphibious operations, is vital to the expeditionary nature of the Marine Corps, as shown by the battalion’s participation in land combat operations in Iraq and Afghanistan.

“It’s really important to know [which] vehicles are able to accomplish what and to be able to overcome obstacles,” Baker said. “It kind of gives everybody more knowledge and more experience when it comes to doing the basics. We’re just training like we fight.”

Date Taken:05.27.2015
Date Posted:05.28.2015 09:29
Story ID:164776
Location:CAMP LEJEUNE, NC, US 

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