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GameStop: How a fight between Reddit users and Wall Street saw video game company’s stock increase tenfold

Video game retailer GameStop’s stock price has increased dramatically due to the actions of users on the WallStreetBets subreddit.

The Reddit users pushed the stock up from $20 on 11 January to a staggering high of $146.97.

The general reason for this is because the stock market is subject to wild speculation that can deem companies like Tesla, for example, more valuable than the nine largest automakers combined.

The more specific reason is that the company found itself as the central catalyst in a battle between short-sellers and online traders.

Follow live: GameStop stock news latest updates

What is GameStop?

GameStop is a US video game retailer. In the midst of the pandemic, when the company’s physical stores have struggled, it has become a target for amateur traders.

The store was not expected to turn a profit before 2023, but has seen its market value triple to $4.5 billion in three weeks, Bloomberg reports.

What is r/WallStreetBets?

WallStreetBets is a subreddit – a small community – on the social media app Reddit. Users of the platform have taken to trading stocks over the past several months, who treat the market as a “roulette wheel” rather than any long term wealth strategy, Vox reports. 

The subreddit is described as the "Wild West of investing advice," or “like 4chan found a Bloomberg terminal”, with over one million subscribers to the page.

The community has had successes historically, such as exploiting a breach in a trading app that allowed for infinite leverage, but others have lost huge amounts of money in a group that takes glee in all-or-nothing ventures.

What happened to GameStop’s stock?

GameStop’s stock, as one Reddit moderator told Wired, was “a meme stock that really blew up.” The company was struggling financially both before and after the pandemic, with many analysts suggesting short-selling the stock to profit off its decline.

However, as Ars Technica reports, investor Ryan Cohen – who had previously invested in safe stocks such as Apple - bought a ten per cent stake in the retailer, a move which attracted notice. Cohen purchased enough to reach the board of directors, and pushed the company to expand its ecommerce prescence.

As the stock increased, short sellers found that they had to buy more stock in order to cover their borrowing, Wired reports. This is known as a “short squeeze”, when investors who have bet against a stock rising try to cover their loss and the price of the stock increases.

Ultimately, because GameStop looked like it was going to fail but did not, the perverse situation meant that individual stock buyers on WallStreetBets started pushing the stock upwards.

Read more: GameStop: Reddit users claim victory as $13bn hedge fund closes position, accepting huge losses

What happened with Citron Research?

The invested advice on Reddit laid the foundation for GameStop’s renewal, but it was the prospect of a battle against traditional short sellers that really drove the most unusual behaviour around the GameStop stock.

Citron Research founder Andrew Left, as Wired reports, suggested that the stock would drop from $41 to $20. “We understand short interest better than you and will explain,” he said in a now-unlisted video, and that he had never seen “people so angry about someone showing the other side of a trade” on a “failing mall-based retailer”  .

This reportedly triggered tensions between WallStreetBets and Citron Research, with Reddit users essentially buying into the stock out of spite, fighting against the traditional Wall Street view that markets are driven by fundamental values, according to Corey Hoffstein, chief investment officer of quantitative investment and research firm Newfound Research, who spoke to Wired.  

The response to the dispute simply pushed the stock higher, with GameStop closing out on $65.01 on Thursday. Although that will likely not be sustainable as WallStreetBets finds other interests, those who did buy into the hype market have seen an on-paper profit from their moves.  

According to Bloomberg, one WallStreetBets user claims he rolled a nearly $55,000 investment in GameStop call options into an $11.2 million paper fortune with Bawse1, a WallStreetBets moderator, telling Wired that this is the first time in years on WallStreetBets that “everybody was making money.”

Did r/WallStreetBets get shut down?

In the aftermath of the changes, the WallStreetBets subreddit was temporarily made private before being reopened again, due to a huge influx of users attempting to join.

“We have grown to the kind of size we only dreamed of in the time it takes to get a bad nights sleep,” the moderators said in a post. “We’ve got so many comments and submissions that we can’t possibly even read them all, let alone act on them as moderators,”

Separately, as Reuters reports, the Discord voice-chat channel for the group said it removed the WallStreetBets server from the platform for violating its guidelines on hate speech.

“We decided to remove the server and its owner from Discord for continuing to allow hateful and discriminatory content after repeated warnings,” a Discord spokesman said, and had apparently issued multiple warnings to the server admin before doing so.

“The server has been on our Trust & Safety team’s radar for some time due to occasional content that violates our Community Guidelines, including hate speech, glorifying violence, and spreading misinformation. Over the past few months, we have issued multiple warnings to the server admin", Discord also said, as reported by Engadget.

"To be clear, we did not ban this server due to financial fraud related to GameStop or other stocks. Discord welcomes a broad variety of personal finance discussions, from investment clubs and day traders to college students and professional financial advisors. We are monitoring this situation and in the event there are allegations of illegal activities, we will cooperate with authorities as appropriate."

In response, the WallStreetBets moderators said that its Discord was “the first causality” of its success.

“You know as well as I do that if you gather 250k people in one spot someone is going to say something that makes you look bad. That room was golden and the people that run it are awesome. We blocked all bad words with a bot, which should be enough, but apparently if someone can say a bad word with weird unicode icelandic characters and someone can screenshot it you don't get to hang out with your friends anymore,” the moderators wrote in the aforementioned post.

“Discord did us dirty and I am not impressed with them destroying our community instead of stepping in with the wrench we may have needed to fix things, especially after we got over 1,000 server boosts. That is pretty unethical.”

What happens now?

It is unclear, should hedge fund companies continue to lose money on stocks, whether regulators will step in. 

“We are aware of and actively monitoring the on-going market volatility in the options and equities markets and, consistent with our mission to protect investors and maintain fair, orderly, and efficient markets, we are working with our fellow regulators to assess the situation and review the activities of regulated entities, financial intermediaries, and other market participants", the US Securities and Exchange Commission said in a statement.

The Biden administration has also said that it is monitoring the situation. "It is a good reminder that the stock market is not the only measure of the health of our economy and it does not reflect how working and middle-class families are doing," the White House said in a briefing.

Sours: https://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/gadgets-and-tech/gamestop-reddit-wall-street-stock-b1792929.html

Alli Vera has sold more than 2,600 articles of clothing on Depop since 2016. Her shop, Color Club, specializes in vintage styles from the 1970s through the early 2000s, and most of the garments are sourced from local thrift stores in Virginia, where she lives. In March, Vera decided to permanently close Color Club and leave behind her 83,000 Depop followers.

In a 28-minute video, Vera explained that she wanted to focus on growing her YouTube channel, since reselling had become “crazy time-consuming.” But nearly half the video addressed an ongoing debate in the secondhand fashion world, one of the pillars of the sustainable fashion movement. The concern is over how upper- and middle-class “haulers” — people who purchase massive amounts of secondhand clothing for resale purposes or personal wear — are contributing to the gentrification of thrift stores.

The popularity and proliferation of thrift haul videos on YouTube and TikTok have introduced thrift shopping to a generation of teenagers, even those who can afford to buy new items. In a digital world where style is constantly on display, thrifted garments are unique, and fast fashion has significantly lowered expectations around price. Regular people can build a substantial social media following based on their proclivity for thrifting. These vloggers, most of whom are young women, film themselves perusing through racks at Goodwill or showcasing and styling the garments they’ve found. Platforms like Depop, Poshmark, and Mercari have also made secondhand buying and reselling more accessible, especially with the pandemic’s impact on in-person shopping.

The secondhand apparel market was worth about $28 billion in 2019 and is expected to reach $64 billion in 2024, according to the 2020 Resale Report by ThredUp and GlobalData. Within this market, traditional thrift and donation stores (not-for-profit organizations such as Goodwill and the Salvation Army, for example) currently account for the bulk of secondhand sales, but the ThredUp report anticipates that resale (through independently owned consignment stores and Depop shops) will grow significantly. Secondhand buying is growing — and likely contributing to the decline of fast fashion. That should be a good thing, especially for environmental reasons. So why has buying and selling used clothes become, to use internet parlance, so problematic?

The criticism surrounding the so-called gentrification of thrift stores has zeroed in on excessive shoppers: Depop resellers, like Vera, who mark up items found at their local Goodwill to turn a profit; thrift shop YouTubers who frequently buy more than they could reasonably wear; and thrift “flippers’’ who buy oversized garments to transform into smaller, fitted items. The general argument is that resellers and bulk buyers are inadvertently raising the prices of thrifted goods by purchasing items they don’t personally need. As a result, low-income shoppers might be priced out of thrift stores in their area, and plus-sized consumers, who already struggle to find clothing in the firsthand market, could be left with fewer options.

At the heart of this online discourse, which is being driven primarily by young women shoppers, is a broad critique of overconsumption and resellers’ profit motivations. The argument has pervaded the fashion worlds on YouTube and TikTok over the past year, coinciding with the pandemic and its toll on the retail industry. In a world that produces too many clothes, who gets to sell and who gets to buy, even when the items are all secondhand?


There is perhaps no better embodiment of free market capitalism than resale marketplaces. Prices are dictated by sellers, which means items’ value can range from the reasonable to the outlandish. On Depop, where 90 percent of active users are under 26, shop owners are often young adults or teenagers selling their thrifted garments to buyers in their age cohort. These young consumers might have minimal knowledge to help discern true vintage items from the mounds of thrifted clothes on Depop, and as a result could be paying well-above-average prices for items that aren’t really that special. For resellers, though, so long as there is at least one buyer willing to pay the listed amount, the price must not be that outrageous. In a competitive market, so the thinking goes, it’s simply supply and demand.

Currently, the hottest genre of clothing on Depop, as Vox’s Rebecca Jennings has reported, is Y2K and ’90s styles: satin bustiers, low-rise jeans, baguette bags, halter tops, and cropped tees. Unsurprisingly, resellers have thrown screen-printed baby tees and children’s clothing into the mix — pieces that are often advertised for double or triple their thrifted price and which tend to generate the most social media outrage for absurd markups. It doesn’t help that most garments on Depop are tagged as “vintage” to drive search traffic to sellers’ stores, even if the term technically only applies to items that are at least 20 years old.

Ridiculous Depop listings are screenshotted and reposted on TikTok or Twitter for users to mock, with commentary verging on the cusp of disbelief and derision. In December, after screenshots of TikTok user @dullgerm’s thrift haul went viral on Twitter, people pointed out how she was upselling thrifted garments on Depop for more than double their original prices. “$40 for a skirt you bought for what $7 max?” one TikTok user commented. It was “market value,” the seller responded, pointing out that the skirt sold for the listed price.

As more of these callout posts go viral, some resellers, particularly those who publicly document their haul process on TikTok, have been branded as scammers, grifters, and gentrifiers. On the Depop subreddit, shop owners have advised others to stop promoting themselves on TikTok or to remain mum about where they source from, in case their profit margins get scrutinized.

“I can’t speak to the motivations of every seller, but before I list a price, I factor in the 10 percent fee Depop takes, shipping costs, and the time [it] takes to clean, style, and package the garment,” said Sora, a teenage Depop seller who asked that their last name be withheld out of concern for their business. “I care about quality, and I’m not the type of person who upsells every trendy item I come across at the thrift store just to make a quick buck.”

Sellers like Sora worry the overwhelming focus on the ethics of selling and buying secondhand detracts from other issues in the fashion world, specifically fast fashion and the growth of dropshipping. Dropshippers on Etsy and Depop don’t manufacture garments or items directly. Instead, they place bulk orders from factories (sometimes overseas) and ship the product to buyers themselves, usually under the guise that the items are unique or handmade. When major clothing brands barely understand their supply chain, it’s nearly impossible for consumers to determine whether small sellers’ wares are from reputable sources. Thrifting, at least, avoids this concern.

“My shop is a one-person operation, and I love thrifting, photographing the clothes, and selling them as a hobby,” Sora said. “I wish there were more constructive conversations about buying from Amazon or fast-fashion retailers like H&M and Shein, so it’s frustrating to see all this anger directed at resellers, who are mostly young women trying to start a business.”

The concern over the gentrification of thrift stores is not a new phenomenon, although the internet’s cycle of discourse has certainly accelerated it. Jennifer Le Zotte, an assistant professor at the University of North Carolina Wilmington, said the history of thrift and secondhand shopping is rooted in stylistic and economic appropriation by well-off consumers dating to the 19th century.

“It has been a process of appropriating not just the styles associated with secondhand dress but the actual venues: the sales of items, the economic process, and availability,” Le Zotte told me. “Secondhand buying and selling has never wholly been for the altruistic reasons that are often championed, whether it be environmental or to aid people who can’t afford to buy firsthand clothing. This isn’t a new conversation at all.”

In her book From Goodwill to Grunge: A History of Secondhand Styles and Alternative Economies, Le Zotte writes that thrift stores, the organizations that run them, and consumer interest all reveal “an increasingly intricate relationship between industrial capitalism, social welfare, and mass culture” that was “responsive to changes in the meaning of public appearance.” Early in their history, thrift stores gave more people access to newer fashions, benefiting immigrants, minorities, and low-income shoppers who existed on the margins of the consumer world.

But as clothing production sped up in the 20th century, thrift stores became places where Americans discarded used clothing for newer items. “What this accomplished, even back a century ago, was to constantly accelerate the demand for new clothing,” Le Zotte told me. “The impetus to get rid of clothing is often charitable, but the more clothing that is contributed and viable, the more fashion cycles speed up.”

This is currently reflected in the availability and pricing of new clothing. Fast-fashion and “ultra-fast-fashion” brands like Shein and Fashion Nova release hundreds of new styles every week. Americans are buying more clothes than ever; even avid thrifters have felt the need to accumulate new styles and garments to keep up appearances on social media. Still, the discourse combined with the pandemic has led some resellers to reevaluate their purchasing pace and their definition of “sustainable” consumption.

Thrift-oriented YouTuber Alexa Hollander — aka Alexa Sunshine — grew her channel by consistently uploading “Thrift With Me” hauls but told subscribers in January that haul content would no longer be a main part of her YouTube channel. “My favorite part about thrifting is showing all the gems you can find and not having the pressure to buy it,” she said in a video, explaining why she felt stressed about the sustainable fashion movement. Hollander’s decluttering videos have received comments criticizing her overconsumption habits, and over the past year, she was moved to reassess how frequently she bought or thrifted clothes.

According to Le Zotte, this wide-scale reflection on individualized consumption habits is generally positive. Social media platforms, through ads and the streamlining of the purchasing process, have only eased people into buying more. Still, Le Zotte said she is skeptical that excessive shoppers are to blame for rising thrift store prices, or for buying up items intended for low-income people. Thrift haulers are not outpacing the production of new clothes. During Covid-19, thrift and charity shops across the US received more donations than they could handle. Tons of pre-owned garments still go to landfills or get sold by the ton for very cheap amounts overseas. These misconceptions, Le Zotte said, are wrapped up in the prevailing myth that donating clothes offers a net positive for society, an idea that has existed for decades.

“The idea is that you’re giving it to someone who otherwise wouldn’t be able to buy, and that has expanded to such a degree that there’s so much secondhand clothing waste, [the] equation doesn’t work out anymore,” said Le Zotte. And thrift stores have historically distinguished high-quality goods from regular garments by charging more, upcycling, or selling it in higher-priced shops. “This blame shouldn’t be directed specifically at the haulers or buyers,” she added. “Maybe we should look at the corporate facilities, even as they’re classed as nonprofit organizations. That is a dubious delineation when it comes to major secondhand clothing corporations.”


A common refrain online is that wealthy white teenagers have ruined things: Depop, the Y2K trend, even the premise of thrifting itself. It’s a tale as old as time, but the internet has a tendency to make things seem new. When a trend enters the mainstream, it’s inevitable that retailers and people (namely, influencers) will try to profit off of it. The markup on Y2K-styled clothing is just the latest example of how easily retro aesthetics are co-opted once enough consumers think it looks cool.

Mainstream retailers such as Urban Outfitters initially drove this aesthetic reappropriation. Through its Urban Renewal program, UO notoriously sells pre-owned clothing in its shops, labeling it vintage to appeal to customers (sound familiar?) interested in dressing “trendy” without putting in the effort to source such clothing secondhand. In some ways, the program was a corporate precursor to how independent Depop sellers operate. But as illustrated by Macklemore and Ryan Lewis’s hit 2012 single “Thrift Shop,” going to a thrift store soon became a teenage rite of passage and a normalized part of American consumer culture.

Some teenagers and young adults, though, are dropping hundreds of dollars at thrift stores — not just 20 bucks. TikTok’s format, which helps cement the narrative of each user as the main character in their own lives, makes it easy for a certain type of thrifter to be villainized. Over the past year, some of this finger-pointing has been lobbed at individual resellers who feel they’ve received the brunt of backlash that should be directed toward fast-fashion corporations, thrift stores that are purposefully raising prices, and Depop, for its largely unregulated structure.

There’s a lot of rage directed at individuals rather than institutions, one seller remarked on a Depop subreddit. Members of Gen Z know shopping is a political act, and they’re well aware of the nuances of race and class that separate “privileged” individuals from the underprivileged. Still, the psychic burden laid upon shoppers and sellers to operate ethically under a flawed system can be overwhelming. It’s easier to point fingers at visible, seemingly well-off people — who have the means to go to thrift stores and buy up heaps of clothes without batting an eye — and ignore the mechanism that makes this a desirable act.

While thrift shopping, on its surface, might seem like an anti-capitalist alternative to capitalism, the secondhand market is closely linked to the firsthand retail market. “There’s a lot of rhetoric that makes it seem like thrift shopping exists ethically outside the negative ramifications of capitalism,” Le Zotte said. Sadly, thrift shopping exists in the same messy reality as everything else.

Sours: https://www.vox.com/the-goods/22396051/thrift-store-hauls-ethics-depop
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20 Unethical (but Brilliant) Life Hacks From Reddit

Image for article titled 20 Unethical (but Brilliant) Life Hacks From Reddit

The Lifehacker staff are all upstanding members of society with clean driving records and shiny white teeth; we’re not like those reprobates over at Reddit’s Unethical Life Hacks forum. I trolled their dark-side tips to bring you 20 of the most morally questionable, legally dubious, often hilarious (but sometimes useful) hacks Reddit had to offer.

(Please do not actually do any of these terrible things.)

2 / 22

Use a memory foam pillow as a fart bomb

Use a memory foam pillow as a fart bomb

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I don’t own one of these pillows, so I can’t check whether this stealth cropdusting trick would work, but I don’t see why it wouldn’t.

Note: According to Lifehacker’s deputy editor, Joel Cunningham: Fart particles should be referred to as “farticles.”

Verdict: Hilarious

3 / 22

How to slap your boss in the head

How to slap your boss in the head

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Sadly, our work-from-home world makes this one impossible to try out for many of us, and assault is illegal, so you shouldn’t actually do this. Unless your boss is a total jerk.

Verdict: Hilarious

4 / 22

Get cheaper services just by asking for them

Get cheaper services just by asking for them

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This tip is from two years ago, so I have no ideas if the specific pricing for Audible is still in effect, but it highlights a larger point: Often companies will offer you cheaper prices if you ask correctly. Try telling your cable company or phone service you’re thinking of switching, and see what they can do for you.

It’s not even unethical, really. Not as unethical as hiding what a service costs in the hope that you won’t ask for the lower rate, anyway.

Verdict: Useful

5 / 22

Can you fool drug dogs through creative baking?

Can you fool drug dogs through creative baking?

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I have no idea whether this trick would actually work. I lean toward “no,” because them police dogs is smart. Anyway, who would want to be the first one to try it? Still, there’s something appealing about the creative challenge of baking edibles that could pass as dog treats instead of, say, wrapping your weed in a steak to get the same effect.

Verdict: Undetermined

6 / 22

Get revenge on your enemies from beyond the grave

Get revenge on your enemies from beyond the grave

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This “unethical death tip” seems unlikely to actually work, and you’d never know if it did, but it’s at least possible. And maybe thinking, “they may have the upper hand now, but I’ll get back at them someday” would be worth carrying a note in your wallet?

Verdict: Hilarious

7 / 22

Use your AirPods as a spy tool

Use your AirPods as a spy tool

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If you’re a handsome super-agent with a license to kill, and SPECTRE is plotting to create an underwater civilization by capturing nuclear submarines and triggering World War III, just go to the secret underwater lair in Atlantis, leave your iPhone on the table, and turn on Live Listen while Stromberg tells Jaws his evil scheme. Before long, you should be able to thwart the plan, throw Jaws in a shark tank, and make out with a beautiful woman. The Live Listen range is about 50 feet.

Verdict: Useful

8 / 22

Trick your friends into leaving you their money

Trick your friends into leaving you their money

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This is a good tip if you want your most intimate friendships to become decades-long not-dying contests, while besmirching your own legacy.

I’d say “go for it,” but your dumb-ass friends probably aren’t leaving behind sizable estates.

Verdict: Ridiculous.

9 / 22

How to get more cake

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I’m pretty sure my older brother did this to me throughout my childhood. He also taped down the head of his Rock ‘em Sock ‘em Robot so I could never knock his block off. (I didn’t need the extra cake anyway.)

Verdict: Useful

10 / 22

Lie your way to your dream job

Lie your way to your dream job

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I’m using this “career gap” hack to stand in for a ton of “unethical” advice on Reddit that boils down to “just lie,” and it’s kind of bogus.

In theory, lying can solve a lot of problems, but in practice, it is very difficult to do successfully, and the difficulty increases in direct proportion to the size of the problem you’re trying to weasel out of—it’s easy to lie to your dog about the walk, but it’s nearly impossible to lie to a cop about the bloodstains on your shirt.

Verdict: Semi-useful

11 / 22

Explain your STD with koalas

Explain your STD with koalas

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There are two strains of Koala-Chlamydia. The most common is not transmissible between the bears and humans, but the second strain, theoretically, could be spread through contact with Koala-urine. As long as you’re cool with telling your spouse, “I didn’t cheat on you. My koala peed on me,” this would totally work.

Verdict: Useful

12 / 22

Use airplane mode to hang up on people

Use airplane mode to hang up on people

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Want to fake phone-trouble to get out of an annoying call? This tip will do it for you. I tried it out, and it does work with iPhones, although whether the person you’re calling understands the subtle distinction between a hang-up and “call failed” really depends.

Verdict: Useful

13 / 22

How to redeem gift cards you give away

How to redeem gift cards you give away

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Many people don’t use the gift cards they’re given, and this hack lets you profit off that.

I encourage everyone to give me gift cards in the hope that I won’t redeem them. Why not turn birthdays into a game and give me motivation to not let those cards gather dust?

Verdict: Useful

14 / 22

How to get free flowers for life

How to get free flowers for life

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Wow, Reddit’s Unethical Life Pro Tips board can get dark.

Verdict: Ridiculous

15 / 22

Cheat on tests by learning Braille

Cheat on tests by learning Braille

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I love the absurdity of this one: All you need to do to ace a test is learn to read without using your eyes, print up a cheat-sheet on a Braille printer (the cheap ones retail for $1,800), and hide it in your hoodie. So much easier than just studying.

Verdict: Ridiculous

16 / 22

Keep dogs away with deceptive signs

Keep dogs away with deceptive signs

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According to the honorable Judge Myron Ferguson, it’s illegal for me to build a spike pit on my own damn lawn, but I’m sure there’s no law against a deceptive sign. This is still America, right, Your Honor? We still have freedom?

Verdict: Useful

17 / 22

How to make money through raccoon removal

How to make money through raccoon removal

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If you’re going to go to all this trouble, why not just start an actual raccoon removal business? Raccoon-specialists are very much in demand in today’s job market, and top removers can make in the mid six-figures!

Verdict: Ridiculous

18 / 22

Do your laundry for free

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I’m no ethicist, but if your landlord is charging you to wash clothes, ordering a key to the machines and changing the settings doesn’t seem bad to me, although it probably isn’t fully legal. Bonus points if you’re in a large building and giving everyone free washes—that’s just being a good neighbor.

Verdict: Useful

19 / 22

How to get kids to brush their teeth

How to get kids to brush their teeth

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This tip is bound to result in a lifetime of parental resentment when your child learns the truth. But in the years between their baby teeth falling out and when they turn 14 or so, they’ll really brush their teeth hard, so you can judge for yourself whether it’s worth it.

Verdict: Ridiculous

20 / 22

Send fake emails praising your job performance

Send fake emails praising your job performance

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This “be dishonest” hack is easy to do and easy to pull off. In a lot of jobs, customer praise to management could actually make a difference in your employment life. On the other hand, it’s not fair to your co-workers. And they’re all just awesome, right?

Verdict: Useful

21 / 22

How to make friends through lying

How to make friends through lying

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This might actually work, but you have to ask yourself if you really want to be friends with a bunch of angry people who just got stood up by their Tinder date. Maybe join an astronomy club instead?

Verdict: Ridiculous

Sours: https://lifehacker.com/20-unethical-but-brilliant-life-hacks-from-reddit-1847783281
Unethical Human Experiments - AskReddit

The Best of Reddit's Unethical Life Pro Tips

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We’ve nearly come to the end of Evil Week over at Lifehacker, and thus far, have taught our readers how to get out of plans last-minute and one strategy for ending annoying phone calls without repercussions—but it wouldn’t be right not to credit the Unethical Life Pro Tips subreddit as a source of inspiration.

If you’ve never come across it before, r/ULPT is exactly what you’d expect: a subreddit full of advice that is often at expense of others “and/or with questionable legality.” In other words, you won’t find this advice elsewhere, which makes the subreddit that much more valuable.

Now, we’re not saying we endorse any of these tips, but given the nature of Evil Week, it only seems fitting that we share some of the best stories from the subreddit—and some actual pro tips you might use, without any ethical consequences. Below you’ll find some morally ambiguous advice like how to exit a boring meeting convincingly and one way to avoid houseguests for good.

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How to get a free delivery

If you’re shopping online, and see a “free delivery” threshold set at a certain dollar amount, try this pro tip from u/alexwastakenwastaken. “Add a gift card to your online order to reach the free delivery threshold, then use said card for your next purchase and repeat.” If that doesn’t work, u/eddyfog’s advice might come in handy for sites like Amazon. “... add a DVD that hasn’t been released yet, it’ll pre-order it and you’ll hit the threshold. Then cancel a couple of days later.”

How to exit a meeting quickly

Meeting running a little long? Here’s u/chaoticfather’s advice on how to plan a quick escape. “If a meeting is getting too boring, stand up and walk out quickly while staring at your phone,” they write. “Nobody will stop you, and you’ll have time to think of a decent excuse before you’re interrogated.” Just make sure your eventual excuse is believable. (Herearea few we’d recommend.)

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How to bypass secondary screening at an airport

If you ever receive a boarding press with the dreaded “SSSS” stamped in its corner, that often means you’ve been chosen for secondary screening at the airport. To avoid the extra hassle, just locate your boarding pass on your phone and use that to go through security instead. “Since I had already checked in on the app, I opened it up and displayed my boarding pass, which did not have the SSSS on it,” u/anonuseraccount writes. “I got to TSA, showed my ID, scanned the boarding pass on my phone, and went on my merry way. No secondary screening!”

How to get out of an embarrassing situation

You’re at a party or other social gathering when the worst happens: The toilet has overflowed and it’s all your fault. It’s time to be proactive, as u/sbtex08 recommends. “If you clog the toilet at a party, find the host and ask them where the bathroom is. Walk to the bathroom and immediately return and tell them it is clogged,” they write. Now, it’s somebody else’s fault!

How to get out of holding a baby

Ever feel uncomfortable holding someone’s child? We get it. You don’t want to break ‘em. Here’s an easy excuse: Say you’re sick. “They will be happier if you don’t hold them,” u/braclark writes. And if you really want to sell it, consider a more extreme version, as u/skeepdeepy suggests. “Just tell them that you’re unvaccinated.” Hopefully, you are vaccinated and dealing with a person who is also vaccinated. (If not, well, tell them you’re sick anyway and plan to be vaccinated. Here’s how to convince those naysayers, too.)

How to avoid houseguests

If your in-laws tend to visit a little too often, u/mtrash has an original evil hack that might very well be genius? “When buying home furniture for guests to sit in, buy something somewhat uncomfortable so they won’t want to stay too long,” they write. Perhaps, more realistically, if you’re at a party or other gathering, try removing the chairs one by one until they’re forced to stand and eventually leave, like a game of musical chairs where you’re the eventual winner.

Life in GeneralEvil Hacks

Sours: https://lifehacker.com/the-best-of-reddits-unethical-life-pro-tips-1839511965

Unethical reddit

Then, when she almost stopped thinking, they put out the light and began to undress her completely drunk with the whole crowd and paw everywhere. She did not mind. Sergei took Then she was offered to serve everyone in a good way. She did not agree, resisted, tried to scream.

Unethical Life Hacks You Would Never Think Of - AskReddit

So I ended up there, where I had already done my "wet" affairs: And then it was September. I was returning home from music school. The time is about half past seven in the evening. My path lay right through this park.

Now discussing:

He shone a light into the corner, there was a moped. He ordered me to undress and sit on the moped facing him, then he sat down, spread my legs and began to shine directly into the crotch, examining. My cunt.



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